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 Box Camp Trail #22, AZPrint Full | Basic
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Description 26 Triplogs 0 Topics
RatedFavorite   Wish List Region
 
Mine
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Friends
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 Tucson North
Statistics
Difficulty 4.5    Route Finding
Distance One Way 6.1 miles
Trailhead Elevation 8,050 feet
Elevation Gain -4,314 feet
Accumulated Gain 179 feet
Avg Time One Way 3 - 4 hours
Kokopelli Seeds 6.7
Wildcat04
Descriptions 3
Routes 0
Photos 0
Trips 7 map ( 73 miles )
Age 32
Location
Photos
Rated Viewed All Mine Friends
7  2014-06-25 Mountain Rat
10  2014-05-27 Timknorr
15  2012-09-14 sirena
30  2012-07-15
Sabino Box below Box Spri
bknorby
6  2011-08-13
(Almost) Box Springs Hike
cindyl
28  2010-06-03 sirena
8  2009-04-13 keepmoving
5  2008-08-15 ffwomack
8  2007-07-21 Sjcorrea
16  2007-04-01 Jim Lyding
5  2005-11-17 hikernate
Large Profile
Trailhead Forecast
Historical Weather
Radar
Map - Rainbow Expeditions Santa Catalinas
Forest Coronado
Wilderness Pusch Ridge
Backpack - Yes
Seasons - Spring to Autumn
Official Route
 
Alternative Routes
 
Water
Nearby Hikes Area Water Sources
direct air miles away to trailhead
0.0  Sabino Box below Box Springs Trail
0.0  Box Camp - Palisade Loop
0.0  Brinkley Point
0.4  Vista Trail #14
0.5  Butterfly Trail #16 - Catalina
0.5  Sunset Trail #90 - Catalina
[ View More! ]
Culture
     Flying Knorr X
Space
Fauna
     Black-necked Garter Snake
     Fungus Beetle
     Funnel-web Spider
     Horned Lizard
     Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly
   Sphinx Moth
     Two-tailed Swallowtail Butterf
     Unidentified Fauna
     Western short-horned walking s
Space
Flora
     Broadleaf Four O'Clock
     Claret Cup Cactus
     Coral Bean*
     Coral Bells*
     Hedgehog Cactus
     Hookers Evening Primrose
     Pine Needle Milkweed
   Sonoran globe amaranth
     Southwestern White Pine
     Western Sneezeweed
     Yellow Columbine
Space

Downhill but steep
by Wildcat04

Mobile Version
The Box Camp Trail provides a "ponderosa to saguaro" hike in the Santa Catalina Mountains that will take the hiker through every life zone of the Sonoran Desert. Created in 1897, it was once the most popular pack route into the high country for an escape from the summer heat in the Tucson basin.

Because of its steep and rocky terrain, the Box Camp Trail is most often hiked downhill, beginning at the trailhead (8,050 feet) next to the Catalina Highway. The first two miles of the trail are by far the most pleasant of the entire hike; a gentle descent combined with thick, shady forest and a carpet of pine needles under your feet offer the perfect relief from Tucson's typically hot and dry climate. Some bear sign may be seen in the area, as well as the occasional squirrel. At times, the trail follows (and sometimes crosses) a drainage leading down into Sabino Canyon, which, in the rainy seasons, may contain water.

The forest eventually thins out and transitions to oak woodland, at which point the terrain becomes steeper and follows a ridge. This section, because it is much more open and exposed than the high forest, provides incredible views of the Tucson area and the front range of the Santa Catalinas. One particularly interesting part of this section wanders through an area that was torched by wildfire in the summer of 1997, where some of the charred vegetation remains. There is also a clearing at the end of the ridge that appears to have been cleared for a helicopter landing, which makes for a great lunch spot. After the clearing, the trail begins to drop sharply toward Sabino Basin, and thus, the real hike has begun.

Slightly less than five miles from the trailhead, Apache Spring appears. This spring usually has some amount of water flowing through it, but don't count on it as a water source. The vegetation has now changed to juniper and occasional oak, with some cacti thrown in for variation.

The remaining 2.3 miles down to Sabino Basin traverse through saguaro and dry grassland. The last half mile may be difficult to follow; if you get lost, just bushwhack down to the basin, which is a large area filled with oak trees and bushes next to a creek bed. The basin is shady and cool, giving the hiker a wonderful rest spot.

From Sabino Basin, you have a few options. After crossing the creek bed, the Box Camp Trail comes to an end, and intersects with three different trails: The West Fork Trail, which will take you to Hutch's Pool; The East Fork Trail, which connects with the Palisade Trail in less than a mile; and Sabino Canyon Trail #23, which will lead you back to the end of the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area. From there, you can walk down the road for 4 miles back to the visitor's center, or ride the tram back for a fee.

Overall, the Box Camp Trail is an exciting downhill hike that takes the better part of a day. Expect to spend about 3-4 hours hiking down to Sabino Basin (7.1 miles), and another 1 to 1 1/2 hours if you hike back to the Sabino Canyon Recreation Area (9.6 miles).

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Coronado FS Reports Box Camp Trail provides some of the most dramatic views of any trail in the Santa Catalinas. It also challenges the wilderness traveler with some of the steepest and rockiest. As you might expect, the most rugged sections also offer the best views. This trail extends between the Catalina Highway in the vicinity of Spencer Campground and the East Fork Trail in the Sabino Basin. During the summer, most people hike this trail from the top down. During the winter, use increases on the lower end of the trail.

Starting from the top, the trail follows a course through magnificent stands of large ponderosa pines. If you would like to take an interesting side trip, Box Spring Trail #224A leads 0.9 mile to a perennial spring.

Below the turnoff to the spring this trail begins its steep descent into Sabino Basin. This section is steep and brushy. In some places it can be hard to find. It is maintained infrequently, so if you do come, expect to work hard for the vistas that you will find here. They include views of Sabino Basin, Palisade Canyon and the sprawling city of Tucson in the distance. And in the Fall, aspen leaves splash the mountain slopes with gold.

Before the Catalina Highway was constructed, this trail was the quickest access route to the Soldier Camp high on the mountain's pine-clad slopes.

Attractions:
Great views
Tall trees
Forest to desert diversity
Challenging trail
One-Way Notice: This hike is listed as One-Way. When you hike several trails on a single "hike", log it with a generic name that describes the hike. Then link the trails traveled, check out the example.

Directions Preferred Months Mar Apr Oct Nov
Water / Source:Creek w/Spring
Cell Phone SignalYes Sunrise7:00am Sunset5:19pm
Road / VehiclePaved - Car Okay
Fees / Permit
Sabino/Madera - $5 per day or $20 annual. Catalina State Park $6 per day. Sabino Canyon Tram is $8 extra.

Directions
Print Version
To hike
Trailhead access is from the Catalina Highway about 100 to 150 yards uphill from the Spencer Canyon turnoff (in the vicinity of milepost 22). The lower end of the trail can be reached via the Sabino Canyon Trail #23 and East Fork Trail #24A.

From Tucson, drive east on Tanque Verde Road to Catalina Highway. Turn left on Catalina Highway (the only way you can go) and follow it into the Santa Catalina Mountains for nearly 30 miles. The trailhead is just after milepost 21 on the Catalina Highway, and just beyond the Spencer Canyon Campground.
Login for Mapped Driving Directions
WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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