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Huntsman Spider6 locationsInsect/Spider
.: gummo :.
Sep 23 2010
Sabino Canyon Road
.: paulhubbard :.
Jul 24 2011
Huckaby Trail #161
TypeInsect/Spider
FamilySparassidae - Huntsman spiders
Images Bing, Google

Olios

Common NamesHuntsman Spiders, Giant Crab Spiders, Clock Spiders, Wood Spiders, Rain Spiders, Lizard-eating Spiders.

HabitatFound throughout the World in various habitats, relating to species. They tend to live under rocks, bark and similar shelters, but human encounters are commonly in sheds, garages and other infrequently-disturbed places.

DescriptionSparassidae are eight-eyed spiders. The eyes appear in two largely forward-facing rows of four on the anterior aspect of the prosoma. Many species grow very large – in Laos, Heteropoda maxima males attain a legspan of 250–300 mm (about 10–12 in). Persons unfamiliar with spider taxonomy commonly confuse large species with tarantulas, but huntsman spiders can generally be identified by their legs, which, rather than being jointed vertically relative to the body, are twisted in such a way that in some attitudes the legs extend forward in a crab-like fashion. On their upper surfaces the main colours of huntsman spiders are inconspicuous shades of brown or grey, but many species have undersides more or less aposematically marked in black-and-white, with reddish patches over the mouthparts. Their legs bear fairly prominent spines, but the rest of their bodies are smoothly furry.

CommentsAs adults, huntsman spiders do not build webs, but hunt and forage for food: their diet consists primarily of insects and other invertebrates, and occasionally small skinks and geckos. They live in the crevices of tree bark, but will frequently wander into homes and vehicles. They are able to travel extremely fast, often using a springing jump while running, and walk on walls and even on ceilings. They also tend to exhibit a "cling" reflex if picked up, making them difficult to shake off and much more likely to bite. The females are fierce defenders of their egg sacs and young. They will generally make a threat display if provoked, but if the warning is ignored they may attack and bite. The egg sacs differ fairly widely among the various genera. For example, Palystes females generally suspend large purses in bushes. The sac is reinforced with dead leaves and similar material; if built indoors without disturbance, scraps of paper might be collected and used instead. Like practically all spiders apart from the Uloboridae, Sparassidae use venom to immobilise prey and to assist in digestion. They have been known to inflict defensive bites, but are not widely regarded as dangerous to healthy humans.[6] Huntsman spiders are widely considered beneficial because they feed on insect pests such as cockroaches.

Source: Wikipedia

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