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Yellow Peak - Superstitions
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2011-01-23
7 by
 
Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking Jan 23 2011
Joel Hazelton
Hiking9.00 Miles 1,200 AEG
Hiking9.00 Miles
1,200 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked descriptions
Partners none no partners
I've actually been slightly intrigued with this particular area for a while now. The request for pictures just gave me an excuse to check it out.

Started hiking around 10AM Sunday morning and, having gone backpacking for several consecutive weekends, I felt like I was carrying nothing with just a daypack. I reached the base of Yellow Peak by 11. Instead of hiking up the steep south slopes of the peak, I opted for the long, gradual ridge due north of Yellow Peak. This would also allow for decent exploration of the canyon between it and Black Mesa. So, into the canyon I went. Unfortunately, the canyon is nothing to write home about, at least without water running. I've hiked past the mouth of it in Boulder Canyon during wet winters and seen water spilling out of it. Yesterday, there was nothing but pools. There was, however, camping along the floodplains at some parts, which would allow for a very secluded night if one desired. Eventually it was time to climb out of the canyon. I slightly overshot my ridge, so I ended up having to cross a large ravine which would be my only real explerience with catclaw for the entire hike. The ridge was just as I imagined- gradual and fun. There was actually a game trail to follow for most of it. At the saddle just before the final ascent to Yellow Peak a large white tail deer bounded past me.

As Cannondale Kid describes, the top is a big flat table. I was surprised to see a small grove of teddy bear cholla greet me up there. There are great views in all directions; the visual arrangement of Black Top Mesa, Palimino Mountain and Weaver's Needle is particularly nice. Being only 12:30PM I decided to take a nap under a small mesquite tree, the only spot up there out of direct sunlight. I had originally planned to stay up there for sunset, but I woke up from my nap feeling cranky and utterly uninspired. Cloudless sky, hot sun, and I was thirsty and running low on water. I tried to kick my bad mood by exploring the top of the mesa and looking for the logbook Cannondale Kid described. What I found was bits of a small notebook scattered around the rocks at the very top, and a busted glass jar full of dirt about 20 yards away. :-k

I decided to descend via the ridge south and slightly east of Yellow Peak. That ridge quickly narrows and forms some precipitous drops, so I ended up bailing and heading west, meeting up with the Black Mesa Trail right about where I left it a copule hours earlier. From that point on it was good old fashion trail hiking back to the First Water Trailhead.

Overall, Yellow Peak isn't the greatest destination. If you want a nice, satisfying peak in the western supes go for Black Top Mesa or Battleship instead. I could see using Yellow Peak in a loop with Second Water, Boulder Canyon and Black Mesa. It would also be possible to camp on top.

Photos will be posted this evening.
_____________________
"Arizona is the land of contrast... You can go from Minnesota to California in a matter of minutes, then have Mexican food that night." -Jack Dykinga

http://www.joelhazelton.com
Author
Joel Hazelton's

152 Photosets
  2011-07-25
  2011-07-01
  2011-06-19
  2011-04-16
  2011-03-27
  2011-02-24
  2011-02-13
  2011-01-23
  2011-01-15
  2011-01-08
  2010-12-23
  2010-12-21
  2010-12-19
  2010-12-11
  2010-11-14
  2010-11-06
  2010-10-22
  2010-10-09
  2010-10-06
  2010-10-01
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How To Put Out a Campfire
A campfire must be extinguished by drowning it with water, stirring with a shovel, and repeating that process until the campfire is cold to the touch. A campfire is still a danger if it has any trace of heat, and must not be left or abandoned. Wildfires can begin by abandoned campfires that rebuild heat on windy days and then blowing embers ignite surrounding grasses and brush.
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