username
X
password
register
for free!
help
recent comments


Page 1, 2  Next
Land on Fire: The New Reality of Wildfire in the West by Gary Ferguson
 • Gary Ferguson → Timber Press 2017
Wildfire season is burning longer and hotter, affecting more and more people, especially in the west. Land on Fire explores the fascinating science behind this phenomenon and the ongoing research to find a solution. This gripping narrative details how years of fire suppression and chronic drought have combined to make the situation so dire. Award-winning nature writer Gary Ferguson brings to life the extraordinary efforts of those responsible for fighting wildfires, and deftly explains how nature reacts in the aftermath of flames. Dramatic photographs reveal the terror and beauty of fire, as well as the staggering effect it has on the landscape.

“This comprehensive book offers a fascinating overview of how those fires are fought, and some conversation-starters for how we might reimagine our relationship with the woods.”
— BILL MCKIBBEN, author of Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet

“For readers seeking a nuanced understanding of America's increasingly extreme wildfire problem, this is a superb overview. It’s just the sort of book I wish someone had handed me when I became a fire lookout fifteen years ago. I learned much from it. You will too.”
— PHILIP CONNORS, author of Fire Season: Field Notes from a Wilderness Lookout

“Land on Fire provides a complete view of what it is like to deal with the extreme nature of wildfires out of control, and what the future may bring.”
— BOB FRY, Type 2 Incident Commander, Northern Rockies

“Ferguson provides an incisive rendering of fire ecology, the social impacts of wildfire, and an inside view of the state-of-the-art science and technology behind today’s heroic firefighting efforts.”
— DR. CRISTINA EISENBERG, chief scientist, Earthwatch Institute; author of The Carnivore Way: Coexisting with and Conserving North America’s Predator
Unrated

0 Ratings
View & Review!

Apache Trail (Images of America: Arizona)
 • Superstition Mountain Historical Society → Arcadia Publishing 2009

Pres. Theodore Roosevelt once referred to the Apache Trail as one of the most spectacular best-worth-seeing sights of the world. The once narrow, ancient foot trail built as a supply road for the construction of Roosevelt Dam has now evolved into a state highway with majestic scenic vistas and historical grandeur. Even in the 1920s, the Southern Pacific Railroad touted this road as a must-see side trip. Each year, thousands of people venture along the trail to take a step back in time and relish the breathtaking experience of this fabulous journey. The Fish Creek Hill section remains much as it was back in the early 1900s, a narrow one-vehicle passage on an extremely steep incline that drops 900 feet within a mile along the edge of a steep cliff. Although several miles of the road are now paved, dirt portions remain that allow tourists a sense of perilous adventure.

Unrated

0 Ratings
View & Review!

Arizona Place Names
 • Will Croft Barnes → University of Arizona Press Reprint edition 1988
Review
"A somewhat eclectic, but unfailingly delightful, compilation of facts, folklore, humor, and personal opinion that has achieved the status of southwestern classic. . . . Fifty years after its first publication, it still ranks among the most important books published on the state."—Journal of Arizona History

"This paperback reissue of the original edition (1935) with a new foreward by Bernard L. Fontana will take another generation of readers on a delightful and exciting trip around Arizona stopping at such places as Wickyty-Wizz Canyon, Total Wreck, Christmas, Skull Valley, Freezeout Creek and Poker Mountain. Barnes' work remains an important contribution to Arizona history and literature. The enthusiasm of this pioneer soldier, rancher, and state legislator for his adopted state is contagious, as the new reader will soon discover."—Books of the Southwest

"Later editions have adopted the title and format, but the original Barnes has never been surpassed. 'Place Names' is a modest description, for the listings unleash a flow of history, folklore, geography, and etymology. And yes, even humor and romance. . . . If there is one indispensable Arizona book, Barnes's Arizona Place Names is it. Every man, woman, and child who sets foot in the Grand Canyon State should have this book at hand."—Arizona Highways

"Better buy a couple of copies, one for the car and one for whatever room you do your reading in."—Arizona Daily Star

From the Inside Flap
Will Croft Barnes (1858-1937) first came to Arizona as a cavalryman and went on to become a rancher, state legislator, and conservationist. From 1905 to 1935, his travels throughout the state, largely on horseback, enabled him to gather the anecdotes and geographical information that came to constitute "Arizona Place Names." For this first toponymic encyclopedia of Arizona, Barnes compiled information from published histories, federal and state government documents, and reminiscences of "old timers, Indians, Mexicans, cowboys, sheep-herders, historians, any and everybody who had a story to tell as to the origin and meaning of Arizona names." The result is a book chock full of oddments, humor, and now-forgotten lore, which belongs on the night table as well as in the glove compartment. Barnes' original "Arizona Place Names" has become a booklover's favorite and is much in demand. The University of Arizona Press is pleased to reissue this classic of Arizoniana, which remains as useful and timeless as it was more than half a century ago.
Unrated

0 Ratings
View & Review!

Arizona, the Wonderland: The history of its ancient cliff and cave dwellings, ruined pueblos...
 • George Wharton James → The Page Co 1917
Unrated

0 Ratings
View & Review!

Books
 • Cathy Hufault → Arizona Mountain Publications LLC 2010
Haunting historical adventure drama relays harrowing accounts of rescue, survival,bravery and tragic loss. Nov.15,1958. An arctic-like blizzard roars out of nowhere across the mild desert terrain of southern Arizona. Boy scouts are feared caught out in the open, perhaps buried under the three to seven feet of snowfall in the mountains. Cowboys urge their horses through the chest high snow, hikers push through monster snowdrifts, and helicopters hover at dangerous altitudes in their struggle to find the boys before they die. Re-live the courage, true-grit and anguish on the trail.

3 min trailer
Unrated

0 Ratings
View & Review!

Desert Solitaire
 • Edward Abbey → McGraw Hill Book Co 1967
This ROCKS!

5 Ratings
View & Review!

Encounters with the Archdruid
 • John McPhee  → Farrar Straus and Giroux 1980
Born in 1915, the mountaineer and outdoorsman David Brower has arguably been the single most influential American environmentalist in the last half of the 20th century; even his erstwhile foes at the Department of the Interior grudgingly credit him with having nearly single-handedly halted the construction of a dam in the heart of the Grand Canyon, and he has converted thousands, even millions, of his compatriots to the preservationist cause through his work with the Sierra Club, Friends of the Earth, and other organizations.
Brower was in the thick of battle when John McPhee profiled him for the New Yorker in a piece that would evolve into Encounters with the Archdruid. McPhee follows Brower into unusually close combat as Brower faces down a geologist who is, it seems, convinced that there is no sight quite so elevating as that of a fully operational mine; a developer who (successfully, it turned out) sought to convert an isolated stretch of the Carolina coast into a resort for the moneyed few--and who provided the title for McPhee's book, wryly opining that conservationists are at heart druids who "sacrifice people and worship trees"; and, most formidable of all, former Interior Secretary Floyd Dominy, who oversaw the construction of a structure that for Brower stands as one of the most hated creations of our time, Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River. McPhee offers up an engaging portrait of Brower, a man unafraid of a good fight in the service of the earth, making Encounters an important contribution to the history of the modern environmental movement. --Gregory McNamee

Review
"The importance of this lively book in the unmanageably proliferating literature on ecology is in its confrontation between remarkable men who hold great differences of opinion with integrity on all sides. Mr. McPhee, not pushing, just presenting, portrays them all in the round, showing them clashing in concrete situations where factors are complex and decisions hard. Readers must choose sides."--The Wall Street Journal

"For those who want to understand the issues of the environmental crisis, Encounters with the Archdruid is a superb book. McPhee reveals more nuances of the value revolution that dominates the new age of ecology than most writers could pack into a volume twice as long. I marvel at his capacity to listen intently and extract the essence of a man and his philosophy in the fewest possible words."--Stewart Udall

"Brower and his antagonists are revealed as subtly and convincingly as they would be in a good novel."--Time
Unrated

0 Ratings
View & Review!

Endangered: Biodiversity on the Brink
 •  → Fulcrum Publishing 2010

Urban sprawl, wasteful water use, increasingly ferocious wildlife, changing weather patterns, chronic political infighting. These are but a few of the problems facing animal and plant species throughout the United States and the world. One law, the Endangered Species Act, serves as the primary safety net for protecting wildlife driven to the brink. Can it save us from an extinction crisis?In Endangered, award-winning journalist Mitch Tobin investigates the threats to our planet and offers solutions to potential disaster. Tobin reports from the front lines of Endangered Species Act battles, using America's hottest, driest, fastest-growing region—the Southwest—as a snapshot of the complex and myriad issues confronting imperiled species. These firsthand accounts, eloquently and thoughtfully told, explain the challenges of protecting the natural world and give hope for ecosystems thrown off balance.Mitch Tobin worked as a journalist from 1999 to 2006, covering wildlife, wildfires, and other environmental issues for the Tucson Citizen, Arizona Daily Star, and High Country News. Endangered grew out of Tobin's yearlong series on Arizona's endangered species, which was a finalist for the John B. Oakes Award for Distinguished Environmental Journalism. His work was honored in the Best of the West competition and received first prizes from the Arizona Press Club and Arizona Associated Press Managing Editors. Today, Tobin serves as a consultant to leading conservation groups and foundations.

Unrated

0 Ratings
View & Review!

Ghosts of Gold Mountain: The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad
 • Gordon H Chang → Houghton Mifflin Harcourt 2019
“Gripping… Chang has accomplished the seemingly impossible… he has written a remarkably rich, human and compelling story of the railroad Chinese.”—Peter Cozzens, Wall Street Journal

A groundbreaking, breathtaking history of the Chinese workers who built the Transcontinental Railroad, helping to forge modern America only to disappear into the shadows of history until now.

From across the sea, they came by the thousands, escaping war and poverty in southern China to seek their fortunes in America. Converging on the enormous western worksite of the Transcontinental Railroad, the migrants spent years dynamiting tunnels through the snow-packed cliffs of the Sierra Nevada and laying tracks across the burning Utah desert. Their sweat and blood fueled the ascent of an interlinked, industrial United States. But those of them who survived this perilous effort would suffer a different kind of death—a historical one, as they were pushed first to the margins of American life and then to the fringes of public memory.

In this groundbreaking account, award-winning scholar Gordon H. Chang draws on unprecedented research to recover the Chinese railroad workers’ stories and celebrate their role in remaking America. An invaluable correction of a great historical injustice, Ghosts of Gold Mountain returns these “silent spikes” to their rightful place in our national saga.

“The lived experience of the Railroad Chinese has long been elusive... Chang’s book is a moving effort to recover their stories and honor their indispensable contribution to the building of modern America.”—The New York Times
Unrated

0 Ratings
View & Review!

Hayduke Lives!
 • Edward Abbey → Little, Brown 1971
This ROCKS!

2 Ratings
View & Review!


Suggest a new book by ISBN
helpcommentissue

end of page marker