Camera lust

Camera, Lens, Video & Software

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burntlizard
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Camera lust

Post by burntlizard » May 06 2012 3:44 pm

I subscribe to digital photography school e-mail and thought I'd share this article. I agree with it, your only as good as your skill set. I'm frustrated, but I still learn and ask for assistance from experienced photographers. Although, my life would be a lot easier if my camera could go higher than f8, f22 seems to be a sweet spot for some great photos.

http://digital-photography-school.com/s ... -and-shoot

Cheers,

Lance
Last edited by burntlizard on May 07 2012 3:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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tibber
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Re: Camera lust

Post by tibber » May 11 2012 7:47 am

desertgirl wrote:
7. Study the work of others
Even better, if you get the opportunity to get out with photographers work you admire; what a bonus :y: . I was able to hike along with Ambika and Derek Von Briesen in Aravaipa - that was my first real exposure to see what a Pro sees. I can't tell you how interesting and cool that was :D . Also at our HAZ Photo Workshop a few years ago I got some great tips from Joel, Jake and Johnny.

I will never use a DSLR so I need to get the most out of my higher end point and shoot. Little did I know what value an Arizona Highways 1 day photo workshop would be. I had no idea. And so that I could get the most out of that gift, I studied my manual forward and backward with my camera in front of me. Fortunately for me, there was a lot of stuff on youtube dealing exactly with my brand of camera. The workshop and hands on attention by the Pro and her assistants added value to not only how to use my camera but what to shoot and why.

And then when I was at Madera Canyon, Ambika helped me learn better how to edit my editing.

I think all of our Pros, semi-Pros, wanna-be Pros, could-be Pros offer great advice in this forum from time to time as well as through their photo comments. It is always informative and helpful : app : . I hope they know the rest of us out here sure appreciate their time and effort to help us out.

I used to only care that I was documenting my adventure and just shot :gun: everything it seemed. I'm still having trouble with that but I am getting much better and trying to make the most of the limited camera skills that I have. I think camera lust should really be a "Photoworkshop Lust". If you can't afford the more expensive shoots, Boyce Thompson has many 1 day workshops with various Pros for around $35-50 for non-members and they have several all year long.

Let me finish by saying, I always look forward to seeing what the newest and greatest is in my Panasonic line. I jumped up a grade on the line last year by paying the extra $75 for some of the extra features I wanted and I have to say, it was money well-spent. I do seem to end up buying the latest in the Pany line about every 3 years.

This is a very interesting thread. Thx for starting it.
For me, sometimes it's just as much about the journey as the destination.
Oh, and once in awhile, don't forget to look back at the trail you've traveled.

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hippiepunkpirate
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Re: Camera lust

Post by hippiepunkpirate » May 11 2012 2:46 pm

World-class landscape photographer Alain Briot tweeted this a few minutes ago:
Value your style, not just your equipment.
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paulhubbard
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Re: Camera lust

Post by paulhubbard » May 11 2012 3:52 pm

I heard a story about a photographer who was invited to a dinner party in his honor. The hostess said to him, "I just love your photos, you must have a very nice camera."

After the meal, the photographer told the hostess, "I loved your dinner, you must have a very nice stove."

:sl: :sl: :sl:
Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

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jochal
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Re: Camera lust

Post by jochal » May 11 2012 4:19 pm

@hippiepunkpirate I don't think you want me pursuing a personal style :scared: . I just want to take good pictures that share what I experienced.

Peronally, I would encourage anyone with the means and interest in photography to get an slr, in addition to the compact. There are lots of nuances comparing compacts and dslrs, but to me the bottom line is, more opportunities to shoot, potentially more keepers, and stronger control of perspective. Very often, when vieing the work of pros, what stretches the limits of the camera is what makes my eyes light up.

Theres nothing wrong with starting out in automatic mode taking jpegs; the dslrs's larger sensor will still open the door to many more opportunities. Whether or not you want to be dumb like me and drag the slr all over the place, on bright sunny days, when often the compact would do just as well is another question.

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burntlizard
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Re: Camera lust

Post by burntlizard » May 11 2012 4:57 pm

@Paul Funny story and quote

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hippiepunkpirate
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Re: Camera lust

Post by hippiepunkpirate » May 12 2012 12:03 am

jochal wrote:I don't think you want me pursuing a personal style :scared: . I just want to take good pictures that share what I experienced.
I think what you're two statements here are contradictions of each other, at least from my point of view. It depends on what you want to define as "good pictures", and I personally think that a good picture will in some way be representative of the photographer's personal style. It is understandable to be scared to embrace your personal style, but if your goal is to consistently take better pictures, then developing a personal style is one of the key steps in doing so. Your personal style is already there in some form or another, but if you shy away from it, you may be stunting an important faucet of your growth as a photographer. Personal style is not easy to pin down, like f-stop and shutter speed, or the rule of thirds, or anything else in the technical side of photography. Personal style is enigmatic. It is tied much more closely to the artistic side of photography. The essence is in asking yourself these questions: Do you intend your photos to be representative of how YOU felt when you captured your subject? Are you hoping to elicit an emotional response from your audience? If the answer is yes, then you are in some way trying to create art with your photos. So does it make sense to shun your personal style, all while creating photos that you intend to be representative your vision?

In response to your statements about SLRs, I do agree that they do open the door to many more opportunities. I just think that many people spend the money on their dSLRs, yet they don't intend put in the time and effort to learn how to take advantage of those opportunities, and just simply think that a $750 dSLR kit from Best Buy automatically equals better photos than a point-and-shoot they could grab off Craig's List for $75. I would also agree that there are many people that still shoot with point-and-shoot cameras, that have the motivation to work to take their photography to the next level, and would benefit greatly from investing in a dSLR. But only because they are motivated to invest time and patience in learning how to take advantage of shooting with a dSLR. The advantages are however worthless is no time is spent learning and developing technical and artistic skills and techniques. I'm not saying that there are no benefits to shooting with a dSLR, I but I am saying investing in a dSLR does not make sense for a lot of people because they simply want to walk around taking pictures on auto during their dayhike between the times of 9am and 3pm, and aren't very concerned about rules of composition, lighting situations, or isolating their subject (the very basics of good photography). And to be honest, MOST people fall into this category, and this is fine, I am in no way judging them, but at the same time I would think it silly for them to buy a dSLR.

Let me make it clear that I think everyone that has participated in this thread is probably serious enough about their photography that they don't fall into the category of someone that it makes no sense for them to buy a dSLR. But I enthusiastically believe that anyone that is looking to improve their photography should not be led to believe that buying a dSLR (or any new piece of gear) will be THE SOLUTION. Working on technique, use of light and color, composition, developing personal style, digital developing, and the long list of many other things (much of which Ambika mentioned in her great list) are what WILL improve any photographer, regardless of what kind of camera they shoot. dSLRs, lenses, filters and all that other stuff are just tools. Give Jack Dykinga from Arizona Highways a point-and-shoot and you'll be amazed what he could do with it. What he does with a dSLR or a 4x5 large format camera will obviously been better, but skill, technique, vision, style, artistry and creativity are what make it awesome. A camera is just a camera.
Last edited by hippiepunkpirate on May 12 2012 9:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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jochal
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Re: Camera lust

Post by jochal » May 12 2012 9:38 am

@hippiepunkpirate Thanks for the awesome response; I'm probably just being too argumentative. I get that way. I guess I just found that style quote as a little trite. Your response is anything but trite. I think a lot of what you call style, I'm just considering as quality.

I'm an opportunistic shooter; I'll shoot anything if I think it'll increase my ability with the camera. Thats not just because I'm a camera nerd and its fun for me, but because I think some day I'll be able to use that ability in a more meaningful way. I have no idea what that might be, but focusing on pure quality for now is probably a good step (I've got a long way to go, I know). In fact, thats why I started taking pictures of birds--a very convenient scene in nature, with some challenge. When I started, I'm not sure I could identify much more than a few species. Its turned out to be pretty fun, and I've learned a lot about birds, the camera, composition, and the difference between a beaver and a muskrat. I'll probably keep doing it, despite needing a much better lens if I wanted to take it seriously.

I was being a little glib when I made fun of myself for dragging the slr around; there actually is rhyme and reason to why I do it for little obvious benefit: 1. I want to get used to carrying the weight around. 2. I've noticed my mental facilities and ability to use a camera go into steep decline while hiking. So, I bring it along to try to get more comfortable with it 3. shutter lag of compacts doesn't work well with animals, especially the ones not concentrated in a man made habitat.

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hippiepunkpirate
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Re: Camera lust

Post by hippiepunkpirate » May 12 2012 9:59 am

@jochalI think it's a good thing you are willing to carry your dSLR around during a typical. For one, depending on where you are going, you may run across opportunities that are conductive to great shooting that you were not expecting (e.g. a patch of wildflowers under the shade of a cliff). And then what you mentioned, getting more comfortable with your camera. And even if you are pretty comfortable with your camera, it is just good to "get warmed up" or "get in the zone". It is often good to take a few photos during less-desirable conditions just to get yourself in the right state of mind. You know, get your brain thinking about composition, subjects, and perhaps the most important thing: what is inspiring you. Scouting potential compositions for when the golden hour rolls around is also a good thing (what is called pre-visualization). That's the great thing about digital, if you take a bunch of photos in undesirable light, you can delete them, but in the end, you got yourself in the right mind-set to take great photos when the light gets good :)
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hippiepunkpirate
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Re: Camera lust

Post by hippiepunkpirate » May 14 2012 12:14 pm

Have a look a redroxx44's brand new Cedar Mesa Ruins photoset: http://hikearizona.com/photoset.php?ID=19983
Guess what kind of camera set-up she is using to get these photos? It's not a dSLR...it's a Olympus E-PM1. Google it. It's a rather advanced micro four-thirds point-and-shoot, but a point-and-shoot none the less. I meant to mention Letty's photos earlier in this thread. She's yet another great example of an awesome photographer that has talent, skills, and creativity but still wants the ultra-convenience of a smaller camera and has found a way to make it work for her, non-dSLR. Bravo, Letty.
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RedRoxx44
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Re: Camera lust

Post by RedRoxx44 » May 14 2012 2:26 pm

Thanks Jake, yes I don't want the weight and bulk of a DSLR set up. I have a Nikon D-90 and that thing with the lens is a brick. For me it's all about being able to get some decent glass on the camera-- I love the Panny 7-14mm cause I am a wide angle shooter. Oly is coming out with an upgraded sensor on a newer camera that's still micro 4/3rds, but I will wait and see how it does before getting together some cash and trading some older equipment ( some prime lenses I never use anymore).

I agree with all the above, just get out and shoot and take chances. The great thing about digital. There are so many wonderful photographers on HAZ and more getting better with every photoset. And it really is about the hiking experience after all, and the pictures just commemorate it.

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AZLumberjack
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Re: Camera lust

Post by AZLumberjack » Dec 01 2014 3:41 pm

Canon SX50....Been lusting for this camera ever since it's introduction because I have the SX40 and love its overall usefulness, but couldn't justify the cost of the newer camera. Well, over the Black Friday weekend I received an email from Canon which discounted several models included the SX50 refurburished, for $200 including free shipping... Hell YES I bought it, now I'm waiting to get my mits on it, as soon as the delivery person arrives..... Anybody want to buy a slightly used SX40?
On every trip into the Superstitions, I find another Gold Mine. Today the mine was filled with Memories. I can not wait for the next trip.

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RowdyandMe
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Re: Camera lust

Post by RowdyandMe » Dec 01 2014 5:08 pm

@mnlumberjack
We have to go hiking again so you can tell what I am doing wrong.
I want to hike across death valley next summer.
Rowdy and Widowmaker

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AZLumberjack
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Re: Camera lust

Post by AZLumberjack » Dec 02 2014 3:07 pm

@Widowmaker
We'll have to set something up Larry, I work Tuesday's at First Water and Saturdays at Peralta, rest of the time can be open for other "stuff" :)
On every trip into the Superstitions, I find another Gold Mine. Today the mine was filled with Memories. I can not wait for the next trip.

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RowdyandMe
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Re: Camera lust

Post by RowdyandMe » Dec 02 2014 3:29 pm

@mnlumberjack Will figure something out.
Rowdy and Widowmaker

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