Need Shoes

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SomaSonia
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Joined: Oct 29 2006 5:14 pm
City, State: Tempe, AZ

Need Shoes

Post by SomaSonia » Oct 29 2006 7:48 pm

Hello,

This is my first post and I am new to this site. I guess I would have to call myself a beginner to intermediate hiker. I live in the Tempe area and I am looking for some hiking companions.

But first I need to get some shoes. Does anyone recommend some brands that will not sap my wallet. My budget is quite limited right now. I just need something besides my nike excercise shoes that I have been using.

Thanks!

Sonia
“Let the beauty of what you love be what you do.” -Rumi

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Davis2001r6
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Post by Davis2001r6 » Oct 29 2006 9:31 pm

Just look for a pair of trailrunners. I've been using New Balance models for about 3 years now. Rarely ever get blisters. You can usually find the 600's on sale for $40-50.

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AZHikr4444
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Shoes...

Post by AZHikr4444 » Oct 29 2006 9:54 pm

Hi Sonia,

If you are truly interested in hiking- the last thing you want to do is scrimp on shoes or boots. If there is anything in the hiking gear category that you want to be careful with- its your footwear! Your boots are gonna take you places, and you definately want to make sure they bring you back- minus the limping.

Check out REI and have someone fit you. You don't necessarily have to buy from them (but- check out their online REI outlet for deals) but you do want to make sure you know your size and what to look for in a good shoe or boot. They are very helpful.

If you are planning on hiking flat trails around the valley, go with the trailrunners. But if you have the Supes in mind- please get some boots with grip. Superstition S&R pull more people out of Siphon Draw for injuries related to wearing inappropriate footwear than any other reason.

I live in Tempe also- pm me sometime if you wanna go for a hike!
Mike
A true outdoorsman, when treed by a bear, sits back and enjoys the view.

Lost? Hell, I ain't never been lost. But I have been a mite confused for a week or two.
-The Mountain Men

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SomaSonia
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Post by SomaSonia » Oct 29 2006 10:31 pm

Thank you all. I will be heading to REI next paycheck.

I do like to do more than just flat hiking. So I guess I should get some boots for the ankle support.
“Let the beauty of what you love be what you do.” -Rumi

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te_wa
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Post by te_wa » Oct 30 2006 5:51 am

good thing about trail runners, you dont need to be "fitted". Just put em on if they fit, wear them. Go to REI and see what you like then buy them HERE

http://www.sierratradingpost.com
:D

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fairweather8588
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Post by fairweather8588 » Oct 30 2006 8:20 am

I wore the big boots for 3 years (Montrail Torre GTXs, and some other Timberland type) and have been using trail runners for about a year. I've noticed no difference in ankle support, and trail runners are much lighter on the foot (more comfortable) and they cost a lot less too. Never going back to the big 'ol boots.

Check out long distance hikers like http://www.andrewskurka.com. He used trail runners on his 7,700 mile hike across the US.
No man should go through life without once experiencing healthy, even bored solitude in the wilderness, finding himself depending solely on himself and thereby learning his true and hidden strength

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PaleoRob
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Post by PaleoRob » Oct 30 2006 12:22 pm

I love my Vasques. I've used them hard for three years now, and I'm finally going to have to replace them soon - and it'll be with another pair of Vasques. I've got Vibram soles, so that's a bit more money, but if you're looking at just a rubber sole, that'll probably run about $50 less than the Vibram. I've seen some Vasques at Sportsman's Warehouse for $80 with the rubber sole, and they usually have some kind of footware sale there.
Of course, my wife swears by trail runners. Its the only thing she's hiked the canyon in, so take it all for what its worth.
"The only thing we did was wrong was staying in the wilderness to long...the only thing we did was right was the day we started to fight..."
-Old Spiritual
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Davis2001r6
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Re: Shoes...

Post by Davis2001r6 » Oct 30 2006 7:51 pm

AZHikr4444 wrote:If you are truly interested in hiking- the last thing you want to do is scrimp on shoes or boots. If there is anything in the hiking gear category that you want to be careful with- its your footwear!

Superstition S&R pull more people out of Siphon Draw for injuries related to wearing inappropriate footwear than any other reason.
I would have to disagree a bit, maybe I'm the minority here, but I have about 400 miles in the Grand Canyon. Not anything anyone would consider flat. Of those 400 miles about 370 were pleasant blister free trips.

I bought a pair of Asolo boots from REI, had them fitted and they felt great. Broke them in on some short hikes in Phoenix, took them on 2 trips to the canyon, the worst trips ever for my feet. The second trip I had to wear my sandals to finish the hike because the boots caused that much pain. That was from a pair of boots that "fit" and were not cheap.

I'll take any pair of trailrunners there and take my chances. The only thing I will wear boots for is winter mountaineering in snow and ice when i need to wear crampons. I don't think my trailrunners will cut it there.

As to S&R on FlatIron, I think the number # reason for rescues there is people who shouldn't be attempting that hike. There is a reason it is rated difficult. Some people aren't experienced enough to be doing the scrambling and climbing required for that hike. It's easier to fall and trip in a heavy pair of boots where you think you can just flop your foot down anywhere, than to actually place it were it needs to be in a pair of trailrunners.

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Desertroux
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Post by Desertroux » Oct 30 2006 8:16 pm

I as many here use to wear boots. Never again. I useing a pair of Montrail Hardrock trailrunners. There great.
The Dude Abides.....

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kylemorgan
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Re: Shoes...

Post by kylemorgan » Oct 31 2006 9:35 am

davis2001r6 wrote:It's easier to fall and trip in a heavy pair of boots where you think you can just flop your foot down anywhere, than to actually place it were it needs to be in a pair of trailrunners.
I think that just goes to inexperience and stupidity, regardless of footwear choice.

I have worn both and they both have their benefits. Just make sure that whatever you get fits right and is comfortable. If you hike enough, you'll get used to either one.
"Efficiency is for robots....be effective." Mike Rowe

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big_load
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Post by big_load » Oct 31 2006 1:44 pm

I'm somewhere in between. I usually wear Dunham Wafflestomper Nimble mids, which are pretty similar to the current model Terrastryder. The soles are much grippier on rough terrain than a normal running shoe, but they're not much heavier. I also like a little more protection from hard bumps in both the toe and ankle than afforded by a straight running shoe. The sole plates in trail runners also give a critical measure of protection not found on straight running shoes. My shoes have several wounds that would also have been foot wounds if not for the plate. Finally, although I can carry up to about 40 pounds with a lightweight shoe, heavier loads demand boots.

That said, fit is all-important. Most claims about a whole class of footwear causing blisters really has more to do with how one or more particular shoes fit the user than whether or not they were boots.

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wetbeaverlover
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Post by wetbeaverlover » Oct 31 2006 3:54 pm

Harvey Butchart, the undisputed hike master of the grand canyon, with over 12,000 miles logged in 42 years, wore cheap workboots. http://www.kaibab.org/gcps/butchart.htm Incredible man with an incredible life story
Dan

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Lizard
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Post by Lizard » Nov 01 2006 8:00 am

Like the others, I've worn nothing but trail runners for the past six years and my feet are happier for it. I often take cross country trips over rough terrain as well. The only reason I would wear boots these days would be in the snowy high mountains, where the boots may be needed to kick steps.
"Of course we weren't lost. We were merely where we shouldn't have been, without knowing exactly where that was."

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RedRoxx44
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Post by RedRoxx44 » Nov 01 2006 12:32 pm

I'm more of a boot wearer I guess. My montrails have gone up and down some steep terrain, no toe bruising or blister problems. I have flat feet and a history of stress fractures at the talocrural joint of my ankles; do the strength and balance stuff, but like more support at my ankles.
However I've worn some trail runner merrel's and dunhams and done ok too, but no long backpacks with those.

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te_wa
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Post by te_wa » Nov 01 2006 1:26 pm

Im not starting a debate about shoes vs. boots here, just a simple observation based on my experience. (im glad to see these opinions anyway)
I wanted to mention that in my experience as a 20 year veteran skateboarder, I do fully believe that skating is many more times exhausting on a persons ankles, and what do you see in a skate shoe? LOW TOP... thats right, not much ankle support. So why in an activity like walking a trail do people insist that high tops are better? Beats me. Same goes for Tennis, soccer, football and (most) other hardcore sports.

You fine people can wear whatever you want and I dont mind a bit, not stirring the pot or anything. It is evident, in my opinion, that high tops are a gimmick and add weight to your feet, which in turn probably is more harmful than good.
One more thing, not all trail runners are what you might think: flimsy mesh and rubber made for skinny trail runners. Some are quite sturdy and well made, and last a long time.
:D

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big_load
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Post by big_load » Nov 01 2006 2:14 pm

Ankle support isn't really an important concern for me. I wear mids because it hurts so darn much when I bump my anklebone against a rock, so I just like having some padding there. I wear boots with heavier loads mainly for the stiffer sole, which reduces punishment on my poor collapsed arches. Actually, my hard orthotics help in this regard, so they extend the load range of trail runners.

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azbackpackr
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Post by azbackpackr » Nov 01 2006 5:06 pm

I am always thrilled to find ANY shoes in my size, 10 1/2 Narrow. Most people have lots of choices when it comes to shoes, but I don't. I have worn Vasque Sundowners and Newbriars--they're very good, last a long time. I just ordered a pair of the Dunham Terradyls that someone else mentioned, because I had wanted for a long time to find trailrunners in my size, and those do come in my size, plus I got them on sale from shoebuy.com! So I'm looking forward to trying them out!

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AZHikr4444
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Shoes and boots

Post by AZHikr4444 » Nov 01 2006 5:47 pm

I have incredibly flat feet as well. My feet have "spread" it seems- I'm up to a 13 wide (my normal every day shoe a year ago was a 12). I wear Vasque Breezes and love them- although I haven't done much really rough off trail desert hiking- they might pick up some spines through the mesh. I've tried some of the low top shoes; I do have a pair of Merrell Salomon that are a bit narrow. The Breeze seems to work for me.

As you can see Sonia, there are a variety of opinions, all of them valid- we all have different feet! You may have to experiment a bit - and go with what feels and works the best for you. Case ya didn't know- our own Teva Joe (who created and maintains this site) was, and is- well known for doing many of his hikes in sandals.

As far as my Siphon Draw comment- I was referring to Siphon Draw not the Flatiron. Most improperly treaded people (usually wearing tennis shoes) who require assistance never make it past the slickrock bowl.
A true outdoorsman, when treed by a bear, sits back and enjoys the view.

Lost? Hell, I ain't never been lost. But I have been a mite confused for a week or two.
-The Mountain Men

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Al_HikesAZ
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Re: Shoes and boots

Post by Al_HikesAZ » Nov 01 2006 5:52 pm

AZHikr4444 wrote: although I haven't done much really rough off trail desert hiking- they might pick up some spines through the mesh.
Would low gaiters keep the spines from going through the mesh on your Vasques?
Anybody can make a hike harder. The real skill comes in making the hike easier.
Not if we can help it UNCLE JACK. http://www.sleepingdogtv.com/reel/Uncle-Jack.aspx Not if we can help it.

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Hakatai
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Post by Hakatai » Nov 01 2006 6:46 pm

It seems to me that everyone that has chimed in has developed their opinions one way, and that is by hiking. I have been hiking quite a bit over many years and have hiked in everything from flip flops to light mountainering boots. I suggest going to REI and trying on at least 5 pair of different shoes and/or boots. Get fit by a pro and stay away from the extremes of either type (light/heavy) of boot. Spend enough to make sure thet you get a proper fit. Once you have done that, HIKE. Hike enough to need a new pair and you will know what you want in the next pair.

Yes, skateboarders wear low cut shoes but they don't take their risks in remote areas with varying access to rescue. Take care of your feet because if they don't go you don't go.

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