NewB hydration question

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New2hyk
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NewB hydration question

Post by New2hyk » Jan 29 2012 10:33 am

Hi,
I am very new to hiking but is looking to buy atleat a 3L hydration pak/day pak gear with a reasonable price tag. With your experience :) , what would you go and buy now?
:thanx: in advance.

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big_load
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by big_load » Jan 29 2012 10:43 am

I wouldn't confine my search to items marketed specifically as hydration packs. My choice for most day trips is an Osprey Talon 22 with a 3L Platypus Hoser.

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azbackpackr
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by azbackpackr » Jan 29 2012 10:57 am

Camelbak or Platypus products work well for most of us. Knockoff bladders tend to leak or worse, they'll work fine for awhile, until one day they suddenly burst all over everything. Which could be dangerous in summer, if that's all the water you have.

This is for anyone on a budget, not aimed at anyone in particular:

If you want to save money, don't use a hydration bladder. Get a used school backpack, such as an old Jansport, (thrift stores, etc.) and buy a couple of 1 or 2 liter Arrowhead waterbottles at the grocery store, carry those inside the pack. They'll last quite a few trips. I'm serious here. I hate to see potential hikers who are on a budget worrying about the latest yuppie gear. It simply is not necessary. If you think you are going out there to impress other people or have a certain fashionable appearance, you really need to get over yourself. You need a hat? You probably have a ball cap. You need snacks but Grizzly Bars cost 4 bucks? Go with Nature Valley granola bars instead, or make cookies at home, and bring fruit, leftovers, sandwiches, etc. You can't afford the latest hi-tech boots or trail shoes? Wear sneakers. You can't afford Leki hiking poles? Break off an agave or pick up a rib from a dead saguaro. You can't afford The North Face hi tech fabric shirt and shorts? But you do have a t-shirt and exercise shorts, so wear those. You can't afford $25 Smartwool socks? But you do have socks in your drawer, so wear those. You don't have a car? Hike close to home, ride the bus or old bike to an urban park trailhead. (Watch out for your good bike at the trailhead, though!)
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A clean house is a sign of a misspent life.

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nonot
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by nonot » Jan 29 2012 11:16 am

Camelback for the 3L - the new one that stays flatter. (Just the bladder - the backpack is a rip off)
For larger - consider the MSR bladders with the adapter hydration kit.

I agree w/AZbackpacker - a jansport backpack and water bottles is cheap and easy. It will work until you finally get sick of having to take off your pack to get a drink.
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azbackpackr
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by azbackpackr » Jan 29 2012 11:35 am

I forgot about MSR!
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A clean house is a sign of a misspent life.

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trekkin_gecko
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by trekkin_gecko » Jan 29 2012 1:06 pm

gatorade and vitamin water bottles are stronger and will last longer
i often just carry a 24 or 32 oz. bottle in my smallest, oldest camelback

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Trishness
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by Trishness » Jan 29 2012 1:23 pm

I'm a camelbak gal. As a matter of fact there is a SMOKIN' deal on a 3 liter hydration pack here:

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/camelb ... rFamily=03

$35.67 for this? Outrageously good deal. Look for the little icon on the website that gives you an extra 30% off of the $50.96 price. With 1769 cubes it'll hold everything including the kitchen sink.

:D
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DBmooner
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by DBmooner » Jan 29 2012 5:30 pm

i have allways used a camelback 3L and my old backpack from high school and it has allways worked for me i broke down and bought a new pack after the holes got to big and the zippers wouldnt stay closed . the only difference that i noticed is the side pockets for water bottels and a littel hole to slide your bladders tube through. not worth the extra money. but the deal that trishness is talking about is really good it is usally $30 for just a 3L bladder.

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kevinweitzel75
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by kevinweitzel75 » Jan 29 2012 5:33 pm

I don't use the bladders. Never could get used to the "rubber" taste. Matter of fact, I have 3 two liter bladders hanging in my closet covered in dust. I use water bottles. Cheaper and tastes better. As for a day pack, I use a Kelly Shrike. Found it on Craigs List for $20 new. Been looking at the Gregory Z30, but cant justify spending $130 for it. Start off cheap or free till you find something that works for you. Be safe, have fun, and Always let someone know when and where you are going and when you plan on coming back.
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I took the road less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference."
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WilliamnWendi
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by WilliamnWendi » Jan 29 2012 7:22 pm

I usually go cheap on the pack but do prefer a bladder to a bottle. I have never really had a bladder go bad on me except for the time I found a baby uprooted ocotillo that I saved by bringing home and planted in a pot. In hindsight it probably wasn't the smartest thing to stick next my bladder but we saved the ocotillo. :D My last bladder lasted longer than the pack which I recently retired do to holes in the bottom. My new pack is not recommended, zippers do not function very easily and the waist belt is padded and designed to be load bearing but the buckle is designed to be quick release which means it pops every time I let my belly out! I have a different buckle on order. It's the Skyline by Outdoor Products. I can live with the zippers and if the buckle does the trick I'll be happy. I need to move up to a 3 liter though, the new Camelbak Antidote is working well for Wendi and I am kind of jealous of the little cutout valve on the nib so I will probably replace it with that. I also carry two filled Nalgene bottles in my pack too, in case one of us or another is need of water, this comes in handy if we need to use some electrolyte packets too.
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outdoor_lover
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by outdoor_lover » Jan 29 2012 7:29 pm

nonot wrote:I agree w/AZbackpacker - a jansport backpack and water bottles is cheap and easy. It will work until you finally get sick of having to take off your pack to get a drink.

While I agree with these guys about using just an old backpack and water bottles to a certain extent because it's cheap and I did it that way for about 5 months, it got to be a pain for me to keep taking the pack off to get to my water. Thus it actually became unhealthy for me because I just quit stopping and then just wasn't drinking enough. (I have to drink alot of water or I start cramping and not feeling well.) I finally bit the bullet and invested in a good pack with a bladder and I have found that I stay alot more hydrated and have fewer problems. I think it's going to depend on how much water your body says you need. I go through at least 3 liters in a 10 mile hike in the winter. (Can't wait for summer, my pack's gonna weigh 25 lbs...) What I did do though is since I was spending the money anyway, I bought a slightly bigger pack (Gregory Z40) so that I could use it as both a Daypack and as an Overnighter if I want.... :)
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azhiker96
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by azhiker96 » Jan 29 2012 9:50 pm

I just retired a North Face pack and started using an REI daypack. I prefer water bottles since they are lighter than a bladder and a single leak doesn't put all my water at risk. Also, it allows me to gauge how much water I've consumed and how much is left. A key is to get a daypack that has side pockets for water bottles. I can get a bottle out and replace it without taking off my pack. For summer hikes I carry extra bottles inside the pack. I find bottles are easier to refill from a stream if you don't use a pump.

One issue I've seen with bladders is hose freeze up on winter hikes. If you do go with a hydration bladder I agree with buying a name brand. They are more reliable than the cheapies and you don't want to lose your water when you're deep in the wilderness.

A cheap day pack is not a bad idea but get one with a waist belt if you can and try to adjust the pack so most of the weight is carried through the belt on your hips. Your shoulders will thank you for it.
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azbackpackr
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by azbackpackr » Jan 30 2012 3:54 am

azhiker96 wrote:One issue I've seen with bladders is hose freeze up on winter hikes. If you do go with a hydration bladder I agree with buying a name brand. They are more reliable than the cheapies and you don't want to lose your water when you're deep in the wilderness.

A cheap day pack is not a bad idea but get one with a waist belt if you can and try to adjust the pack so most of the weight is carried through the belt on your hips. Your shoulders will thank you for it.
I sure have had the hose freeze-up problem when cross country skiing! As for the waist belts, I love them, and am constantly surprised at how many people cut them off. I guess for a lot of people they don't need the weight on the waist. I do find it saves my achy shoulders, though. It also stabilizes the pack, keeps it from swinging around if you do a lot of rock scrambling.
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WilliamnWendi
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by WilliamnWendi » Jan 30 2012 8:16 am

Wendi and I never hike in the snow if we can avoid it. Her pack most recent pack however, I believe is a Camelbak but not sure has the hose come through a zippered compartment in the should strap. The compartment also has a pocket where you can put a hand warmer. All of this is for those crazy Snow-Crunchers. We bought it just for the ability for her to carry a little more gear. The extra features do add a little more weight to the pack that is perhaps unnecessary for us Cholla-Stompers (Referencing my most recent hike...ouch!) but she hasn't complained. If anybody wants details I can get the name of the pack. She got it cheap on ebay.
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trekkin_gecko
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by trekkin_gecko » Jan 30 2012 8:58 am

camelbak rim runner
100 oz. bladder, side pockets for extra bottles, three compartments, rain cover, lots of nooks and crannies
kinda wish it had a waist pocket but i can tuck my camera into one of the side pockets+
cinches up at the hips and is pretty comfy
this pack has plenty of room for anything i need on a day hike, including food and clothing layers
i don't like to carry too much, especially on a hike with a lot of elevation gain so this is enough
if it doesn't fit, i don't need it
i do like a bladder for a longer hike, and agree that it's easier to keep hydrated if you don't have to take off your pack to get to your water

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kingsnake
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by kingsnake » Jan 30 2012 9:25 am

I carry typical 16oz / 500ml bottles, as many as needed. Helps me track my water intake, and avoids mold in the bladder/mouthpiece which I would get because I am too lazy to scrub something like that out. ;) But then I only day hike, not overnight ...
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azbackpackr
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by azbackpackr » Jan 30 2012 10:51 am

A backpacker friend of mine says he has to carry bottles because if he had that tube in his mouth he would drink it all immediately. For me, having the tube reminds me to drink water. I never do feel very thirsty unless I am a bit over-dehydrated, and then it's too late to prevent the headache I will get from dehydration. So, different strokes...
There is a point of no return unremarked at the time in most lives. Graham Greene The Comedians
A clean house is a sign of a misspent life.

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New2hyk
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by New2hyk » Jan 30 2012 2:16 pm

:thanx: so very much for all of your wonderful advice.
I went ahead and placed an order for the backpak that Trish has suggested. I figured, if I don't like the bladder, I will simply remove it.
Right now, I use 2 one liter bottles on the waist pak and keep the bottles on my low back. This is working well since eventhough I am ascending, the weight keeps my lowback firm and have not had any back problems :D
I am switching to isotonic fluids(coconut water--not coconut milk). In India, we use coconut water to redydrate people with cholera..etc and it is a fast way of rehydration since intravenous fluids are hard to come by. I am noticing that I drink less amount of fluid and still feel good on long hikes 8)
I love this site :y: .Keeps me motivated to get out there and to keep challenging myself :DANCE:
Thanks again everybody and have a wonderful week. :D

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azeagleye
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by azeagleye » Jan 31 2012 8:37 am

I have tried numerous day packs and the most comfortable by far to me is the Osprey with waist belt. I have a 24 liter pack and carry either a 2 or 3 liter bladder depending on length of hike and temperature. Temps over 70 will surprise you and you'll want the extra water. I'll also carry a bottle of Gatoraid for hotter temps or longer (+10 miles)/off trail hikes. As I hike with my daughter or friend, the larger pack allows me to carry first aid, larger camera, binoculars at times, and other items. Take some of the popular hikes, assess your water usage and the feel or your pack. With a waist belt you'll relieve the stress on your shoulders. It's no fun having aching shoulders with miles yet to go.

AZEAGLEYE

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roka
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Re: NewB hydration question

Post by roka » Jan 31 2012 9:30 am

I've used hydration packs in the past but don't anymore. I could never get the bladder and tube completely dry after hiking and was always concerned that something nasty would be growing in there. And I never liked sucking on that bite tube. For years now I've been using water bottles and keep them in the side sleeves of my pack. I can reach around to get them out without having to take off the pack. Lately I've been finding and buying nice stainless steel water bottles at the Goodwill thrift shops and buying them for $1 or $2.

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