New Stove

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mttgilbert
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New Stove

Post by mttgilbert » Oct 21 2003 8:02 am

I'm torn. I want to get one of MSRs canister stoves, but next summer we're planning on going to europe for a couple weeks to backpack. As such it was reccomended that I get a multi-fuel stove. Now, I already have several white gas stoves, so I don't really want another one. But thats the other option with kerosene stoves right? Is it really worth getting a stove that might come in handy on one trip, or should I get the MSR and ship myself cannisters of gas ahead (or are they available in europe)? Any suggestions would be appreciated.
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overrocked
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Re: New Stove

Post by overrocked » Oct 21 2003 10:08 am

In response to matt gilbert's reply:
Matt, in case no one responds, Maybe you could try the backpacker.com forum or do a search there on Europe

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AZ_Hiker
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Post by AZ_Hiker » Oct 21 2003 10:31 am

if I were in your shoes.. I think I would take the most dependable one you have and take the extra cannisters, get as many as you think you might need.. then get 3 more.. you can always use them when you get back to the states if you dont use them there.. so your not spending any extra and now you can afford to have another pint of that great beer while your there :)

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Daryl
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Post by Daryl » Oct 21 2003 11:18 am

Tough call. Do some homework and see what type of fuels are available over there ahead of time. You may luck out.
MSR may have a list of their retailers on their web site, if not call or email them for a list of distributors near where you are going.

Either way, I'd suggest getting the good one that you want and make do on the trip that you may not be able to use it on.
“Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid”
John Wayne as Sergeant John M. Stryker, USMC in “The Sands of Iwo Jima”

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olesma
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Post by olesma » Oct 21 2003 12:22 pm

I'm not sure if things have changed in the last few years - but white gas was fairly difficult to come by in Europe last I knew anything about it.

There is one benefit to buying a multi-fuel stove that you may not have considered - the sheer utility of the thing. They can burn just about anything that is flamable. It may not be pretty with some of the more oily fuels (kerosene or diesel for example), but it certainly comes in handy when you're in a tight spot.

Myself - I'd get the multi-fuel. I had one once many moons ago. The ability to burn more than one type of fuel only came in handy once - but boy was I happy about it that one time. Made it all seem worthwhile to me.

Besides - in Europe kerosene is the cheapest fuel around. Also, it stores better than most fuels. White gas only has a shelf life of a year or two. Kerosene has an indefinite shelf life. So if you want to sock some fuel away for emergency purposes (power outage, natural disaster, whatever) then you can have some of that on hand.

This is, of course, all just opinion. I like versatility in my gear - so the multi-fuel is not necessarily a must have - but it's a darned nice to have.
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Dschur
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Post by Dschur » Oct 21 2003 12:28 pm

I think it is against the FAA rules to carry the canisters on the airplane. Or even in your suitcases. Just like you are not able to carry lighters or anything in any of your cases....
Dawn
--On the loose to climb a mountain, on the loose where I am free. On the loose to live my life the way I think my life should be...For we only have a moment and a whole world yet to see...I'll be looking for tomorrow on the loose. ---unknown--

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Lizard
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Post by Lizard » Oct 21 2003 1:10 pm

From what I've heard (I have no firsthand experience), canisters are easier to find in Europe than they are in America. Canisters stoves are the preferred type over there. The most commonly available canisters are the Camping Gaz, which are notorious for only being compatible with the French-made Bleuet stoves. However, I believe the MSR Superfly has a special mounting mechanism which will allow it to be used with any resealable canister on the market. So you might want to look into that stove if you travel overseas frequently.

Pressurized gas canisters cannot be taken on any airplane. USPS will only ship them via ground. I don't know about the private parcel shipping services.

Hope this helps,

Lizard
"Of course we weren't lost. We were merely where we shouldn't have been, without knowing exactly where that was."

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arizonaheat
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Post by arizonaheat » Oct 21 2003 4:31 pm

I use the MSR Dragonfly, which is there multi-fuel model. It is one heck of a stove and has great stability, of course they are built for expedition use and are able to put up with extreme weather conditions and wind. Also field serviceable.

THe thing sounds like a jet airplane when cranked full bore, but it boils water in a heart beat and is really quite economical on it fuel consumption. It is not as convienent as a canister stove and doesn't pack down as small but a heck of a stove.

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fairweather8588
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Post by fairweather8588 » Oct 21 2003 5:37 pm

get an MSR off ebay i got the whisperlite for 40 bucks and two add. 22oz bottles for 10 bucks
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mttgilbert
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Post by mttgilbert » Oct 21 2003 5:52 pm

I just realized that I have an old peak 1 apex II multi-fuel stove in my closet. I completely forgot I bought it. I found it at the thrift store about a year ago and have never used it. I'm going to go dig it out and test it. If it works my problem is solved. Then I get to go get my new MSR (yeah, either way I'm getting a new stove)

If I get an MSR stove it will either be the pocketrocket or the superfly. Those whisperlites are all over ebay and I have a feeling there's probably a reason for that (since almost NONE of the other stoves are there I'm going to assume that it hasn't been all that popular). Besides I really want a stove that sits on top of, rather than next to, the tank. Mainly because of all the extra parts required to connect a tank that sits 8 inches away from the stove. More parts inevitably lead to more problems
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AK
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Post by AK » Oct 21 2003 11:06 pm

Like Dschur and Lizard said Matt, your not allowed to carry or check hazardous materials (such as white gas) on commercial aircraft.
Aaron

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HikerInGilbert
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Post by HikerInGilbert » Oct 22 2003 6:11 am

In response to matt gilbert's reply:

Markill makes a fuel cannister adapter that can be used on any top mount stove which allows use of the Bleuet iso-butane cannisters. I've seen prices range from $5-$15 dollars.

Haven't had a chance to find a local retailer though.
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Lizard
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Post by Lizard » Oct 22 2003 8:24 am

matt gilbert wrote:If I get an MSR stove it will either be the pocketrocket or the superfly. Those whisperlites are all over ebay and I have a feeling there's probably a reason for that (since almost NONE of the other stoves are there I'm going to assume that it hasn't been all that popular).
The MSR Whisperlite is one of the most reliable stoves on the market, and for many many years it was hands-down the most popular among hikers of all kinds. It is being pushed off its top spot these days by the rising popularity of canister and alcohol stoves, and by newer white gas stoves with enhanced capabilities, like the Optimus Nova, MSR Dragonfly and MSR Simmerlite. However, it is still a great stove and you would not be amiss to pick one up. I carried a Whisperlite over nearly 2,500 miles of backpacking before I switched over to an alcohol stove.
"Of course we weren't lost. We were merely where we shouldn't have been, without knowing exactly where that was."

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flechenbones
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Post by flechenbones » Oct 23 2003 9:12 am

I have always liked to have options when traveling so I used the Whisperlite International for years on trips to Europe and Africa. Nice to have options, even if it takes walking up to a remote gas station in Botswana and filling up the fuel bottle with unleaded:)

However, canister stoves are nice and require less maintenance -the most versatile option is to go with the MSR superfly. I bought one several years ago and picked it over the pocket rocket due to the multiple canister mount on the superfly - again, versatility is a plus. I brought it to my last trip to S. Africa and was surprised to see that I could not only find the blue camping gaz canisters (which is all I thought would be available), but also the msr canisters as well. I know you will be able to find camping gaz canisters in Europe - in fact I would suggest they are probably the most frequently encountered canisters abroad. Since msr canisters are apparently spreading, you might even be able to find them there. However, just to be sure go with the superfly.

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hikeaz
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Post by hikeaz » Oct 24 2003 8:54 am

Matt,
GAZ a.k.a. Bluet (now owned by Coleman) canisters are widely available in Europe.
I just rec'd my MSR SuperFly & have tested it on GAZ, as well as various other canisters with success on all of them. I paid $27.00 for a new one on eBay, which is about 1/2 the REI price.
kurt

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plummer150
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re:

Post by plummer150 » Oct 24 2003 8:54 am

I suggest a range that you keep in your house.
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olesma
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Post by olesma » Oct 24 2003 11:49 am

Lizard wrote:The MSR Whisperlite is one of the most reliable stoves on the market, and for many many years it was hands-down the most popular among hikers of all kinds.
Can't agree with this enough. The Whisperlite was THE stove for so long. If you didn't have one you weren't a REAL backpacker - just a weekend warrior.
You don't achieve the type of elite status that stove had (and still has)without being extremely reliable, durable and useful. Sure, as with any liquid fuel stove it had some drawbacks, difficult to light at times, required occasional maintenance - but the advantages FAR outweighed the disadvantages.
I'm not a huge canister stove fan. They're okay - fast, convenient and easy to use - but try using one on a really cold morning. I also don't like the bulk of the canisters, and as a matter of efficiency, I can get a lot longer burn time off of a bottle of liquid fuel than I can out of a canister. Plus they're just what I have used all my life, so I'm used to them.
'Weird is a relative, not an absolute.' - A. Einstein

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mttgilbert
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Post by mttgilbert » Oct 24 2003 12:05 pm

I have always used liquid gas stoves, I have an old primus optimus 99 that has served me well for years. I will still use primus for extended backpacking (the fuel efficiency is tremendous, I can run the stove for nearly two hours on 1/2 cup of gas. I just want a canister stove becuase of the weight factor. Most of the trips I do are under three nights so I don't need all the extra weight of the liquid gas stoves.

I will however rescind my negative comments about the whisperlite.
Cogito ergo ambulo cum sacculo
-Matt Gilbert

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pfredricks
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aww dang.

Post by pfredricks » Oct 24 2003 3:46 pm

Hey Matt,
I thought that I had you sold on the Vaude HOt rod
ha
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Donald
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Brasslite Alcohol stove, etc.

Post by Donald » Nov 08 2003 11:52 am

As per some of the other comments, my first concern would be what stove you could safely put in your luggage on an airplane. It would seem to me that it would have to be just a burner (for cannisters) that would have no residue, or a stove that can be washed leaving no potentiallyexplosive forming residues. I don't know if the latter would be limited to alcohol stoves, but if it is, how about the following:

http://www.brasslite.com/

Some reviews here:
http://art.simon.tripod.com/Stoves/
and I have seen pages with more extensive reviews.

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