Backpacking Stoves.

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mttgilbert
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Backpacking Stoves.

Post by mttgilbert » Apr 22 2003 3:20 pm

In honor of the new LNT links and due to my general interest, I'd like to hear what sort of campstoves everyone uses. And since summer is almost upon us I would like to encourage everyone to ditch the ol' campfire and pick up a stove if you haven't already.

I have always used white gas or solid fuel stoves. My favorite is an old Primus Optimus. Recently I found a Bluet and a Peak One Apex Two at a garage sale. I have tested them out in my kitchen but I would like to know more about these types of stoves and how efficient they are in the wilderness. Especially the peak one. It used a tremendous amount of fuel, more than I thought it should. Is this just how they work or am I doing something wrong

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youngboy
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Post by youngboy » Apr 22 2003 6:24 pm

canister stoves like the MSR pocketrocket are the cheaper end and use only fuel canisters for fuel. for long distance liquid fuel stoves like the MSR dragonfly are better in the long run because of weight, and are sometimes able to burn just about anything short of water.

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montezumawell
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n

Post by montezumawell » Apr 22 2003 6:25 pm

Use a small stove and don't build fires. Period.
Last edited by montezumawell on Apr 22 2003 8:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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azrocks
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Post by azrocks » Apr 22 2003 6:27 pm

For years I used this tiny stove that took a 3 1/8 oz propane cartridge, GT106. Haven't seen them for a couple of years, they may have been imported from France. My new stove is three times the weight and gets through gas faster. Fires, I just go with the flow. Some folks want the beetles to have the firewood, others want to toast their toes as they drink beer. I suspect more wood is shipped to Japan than burned by far.
Last edited by azrocks on Apr 24 2003 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Daryl
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Post by Daryl » Apr 23 2003 11:41 am

I prefer to save the weight and hassles and leave my stove and mess kit at home. I eat stuff that can be stored and eaten at room temp (smoked meats, cheese, bread...).

There are also MREs that are self heating.
“Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid”
John Wayne as Sergeant John M. Stryker, USMC in “The Sands of Iwo Jima”

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pfredricks
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The heat is on.

Post by pfredricks » Apr 23 2003 4:01 pm

Funny, I was just wondering when this subject would come up. I think to figure this subject out you need to ask yourself what the job is, then pick the tool. The liquid fuel stoves are better for long distance hikes(fuel more compact), and places where you are unsure of fuel availability. They are also a huge Pain in the butt and seem to require your undivided attention. I cant tell you how many times, I have seen people spill fuel or the stove gets clogged, etc., but they do work and some swear by them. Canister stoves are sooooo much easier to use. If ya are just going out for a week or so a nice canister is my suggestion as the way to go. Check out the Markill (Vaude) HOt Rod. It is fantastic. It boils H2O about as fast as the MSR stoves and uses way less fuel to do so, because it uses a smaller burner. Some parts of it are titanium, has a Piezo ignition and folds up to microscopic size, is reliable, cheap ($50) and easy to use. I can fit a fuel canister, the stove, salt and pepper shakers, pack towel, silverware, soap and cooking oil, the pot handle, all in a small MSR blacklite cookpot. Errrr, I just realized that this wasnt asking for suggestions, but that is what I use anyway since I already typed it. thanks
"I'd feel better if we had some crampons. Oh, what the hell, let's go for it..." — Common climbing last words.

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mttgilbert
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Re: The heat is on.

Post by mttgilbert » Apr 23 2003 11:34 pm

pfredricks wrote:Errrr, I just realized that this wasnt asking for suggestions, but that is what I use anyway since I already typed it.
Please by all means, I love suggestions, Ill take any I can get.

Of course, I like to give them too. :)

I am one of those people who swear by white gas. For longer trips anyway. My stove is a primus optimus, I think its about 30-40 years old. It has never stopped working, even when fuel sat in it for 10 years or so in an attic. The whole thing only weighs (mess kit and kitchen stuff too) about 30 ounces.

For shorter trips I'm with daryl I take mostly nonprep foods or MREs. But even then I like to take a pocket esbit stove with trioxane (solid fuel bars) Its really only good for boiling water, but what can I say I like my tea.

The cartridge stoves are easier to learn to use and are more forgiving on begginers (I have spilled my fair share of gas on equipment), But in the end its probably all what you get used to.



What sort of equipment is used for larger groups, most of the stoves mentioned so far really would only be good for two or three people. What about larger groups? Are more stoves the only answer?

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youngboy
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Post by youngboy » Apr 24 2003 6:42 am

you could you one of these things for a large group http://www.rei.com/online/store/Product ... rn=4500453

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KH
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Backpacking Stoves.

Post by KH » Apr 24 2003 10:18 am

I guess I am curious as to what is so evil about campfires (as long as you make sure you don't burn down the forrest)?

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Lizard
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Post by Lizard » Apr 24 2003 12:56 pm

I used to use an MSR Whisperlite, and still use it occasionally for winter hikes and hikes with groups of people. However, most of the time now I use a homemade soda can alcohol stove. A guide for making these stoves can be found at http://www.pcthiker.com . They are perfect for my needs-solo trips with not too much cooking, lightweight, simple and not fussy to use.

Lizard
"Of course we weren't lost. We were merely where we shouldn't have been, without knowing exactly where that was."

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mttgilbert
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by mttgilbert » Apr 24 2003 2:29 pm

KH wrote:I guess I am curious as to what is so evil about campfires (as long as you make sure you don't burn down the forrest)?
This subject really warrants its own topic. But the short of it goes something like this:

1. Campfires require wood, the source of which must be limited to down, dead wood. This is scarce in the desert, and is getting scarcer in the woodlands.

2. Campfire circles are blights on the landscape. Often times people will build several of these in a very small area, the rocks are scorched and blackened so that even if someone disperses these campsites the rocks are still noticeable.

3. Too often people don't realize that 'dead out' actually means dead out. There have been too many times I have come across a recently abandonded campsite where the fire was not properly put out.

If you camp only in established campsites and bring in your own wood there is absolutely nothing evil about fires. But people in the back-country ought not light fires at all if they can help it. Besides in the desert, even at night you don't really need a fire for warmth. Cooking is more efficient and more predictable with a stove. And a candle or a flashlight will serve better than a fire for light. So really there is absolutely no need for a campfire. Considering the high-impact nature of campfires it is really better just to not have one.

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mttgilbert
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Post by mttgilbert » Apr 24 2003 2:46 pm

That's a great link Lizard. Im going to have to put one of those together (just for fun if nothing else)
How much does your stove weigh (approzimately) and how long would you estimate the fuel carried in the can burns for.

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Daryl
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Post by Daryl » Apr 24 2003 3:56 pm

I think the camp fire issue was a topic awhile back.

My opinion... Campfire rings are not all that much of an eyesore. I've never hiked through an area like Aravipa or the Supes and said or heard "Look at that fire ring, the view here is horrible." As for multiple fire rings at one campsite, I've seen it before and people that do it are just stupid. Same goes for people who don't put their fire out, make too big of a fire...

Thus, just don't be stupid.
“Life is tough, but it’s tougher if you’re stupid”
John Wayne as Sergeant John M. Stryker, USMC in “The Sands of Iwo Jima”

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mttgilbert
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Post by mttgilbert » Apr 24 2003 4:35 pm

Daryl wrote:Thus, just don't be stupid.
Amen.

I just found a great link on just about everything backpaking-stoves, check it out.

(dead link removed)

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Larry Bolton
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Post by Larry Bolton » Apr 25 2003 2:51 pm

While I got back into backpacking recently (<4 years ago) I have already bought 2 different stoves. The first stove I had was a SVEA 123 (sold through Optimus). This thing is a rugged white gas stove that has been sold for years. The only problem was weight and I was never too good at starting it. With the need for simplicity and less weight I bought the MSR Pocketrocket. What a great little stove. Very easy to use, weight 3 oz plus canister. If I was going backpacking for a week or more then I’d probably use the SVEA 123 but the Pocketrocket is wonderful. It boils water very fast and I can control the flame well enough to make pancakes.

As for campfires, if you are going to an area that permits them and you use existing fire rings and you use only dead, downed wood I don’t see a problem. The key is responsibility. Responsibility regarding all of the above and fire management (no bonfires) and making sure the fire is OUT. Besides, who doesn’t like to take that last piss on it to make sure it’s really out?

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nealz
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Post by nealz » Apr 25 2003 4:12 pm

Larry Bolton wrote:The first stove I had was a SVEA 123 (sold through Optimus).
Wow Larry, that was my first stove too, about 30 years ago :o (and it was 'old school' even then). Mine still works, weighs a ton and has always had a number of eccentricities in cold weather, but when the brass is polished it's a work of art.

However, I switched to a Snow Peak Giga Ti canister stove about four years ago and haven't looked back. It doesn't weigh a thing, packs into the Snow Peak cookset with a can of fuel, starts and works like a cruise missle every time and is cool lookin' to boot.

I was concerned about generating empty fuel cartridge waste until I read that if you completely empty the all-steel canister, it can be crushed and recycled. One well-placed whack with a ten-pound sledge hammer does it for me.

-Nealz
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cactuscat
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Post by cactuscat » Apr 25 2003 4:33 pm

The MSR PocketRocket rocks. I love mine!
Where is the "dislike" button?

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Lizard
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Post by Lizard » Apr 25 2003 5:13 pm

matt gilbert wrote:That's a great link Lizard. Im going to have to put one of those together (just for fun if nothing else)
How much does your stove weigh (approzimately) and how long would you estimate the fuel carried in the can burns for.
The stove itself weighs less than an ounce. Although you'll have to carry a seperate fuel bottle, which adds weight of course. Once you fill the stove up it burns for about 7-9 minutes. Alcohol burns less hot than white gas or butane though, so that one burn is just enough to boil a pot of water for a one-person meal. However, once you factor in the time it takes to pump, unclog and set up a white gas stove, the time difference is not really that big.

Lizard
"Of course we weren't lost. We were merely where we shouldn't have been, without knowing exactly where that was."

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mttgilbert
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Post by mttgilbert » Aug 15 2003 8:54 pm

In response to Lizard's reply:

All right. Old topic, new question, for those of you using an alcohal stove. Is it possible to cook over it? or is the heat too low?

I've been using an esbit stove with military trioxane, but that stuff is way too hot to cook over. I'd like to be able to actually cook with a lightweight stove, but so far all I can do is boil water.

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overrocked
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alcohol stove

Post by overrocked » Aug 17 2003 12:21 pm

In response to matt gilbert's reply:
Nope,,, don't use the alcohol stove for cooking. Strictly hot water heating only..... But I do use wood for cooking,,,,, if it's permitted. I tried a simmer device which just opens a slot above the burner, but it burnt the hell out of my cupcake. So far i haven't been able to get a simmer device to work, but I've only tried one design.... :roll: So anybody out there with a simmer device that works, let me know.

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