Backpacking Stoves.

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mttgilbert
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Backpacking Stoves.

Post by mttgilbert » Apr 22 2003 3:20 pm

In honor of the new LNT links and due to my general interest, I'd like to hear what sort of campstoves everyone uses. And since summer is almost upon us I would like to encourage everyone to ditch the ol' campfire and pick up a stove if you haven't already.

I have always used white gas or solid fuel stoves. My favorite is an old Primus Optimus. Recently I found a Bluet and a Peak One Apex Two at a garage sale. I have tested them out in my kitchen but I would like to know more about these types of stoves and how efficient they are in the wilderness. Especially the peak one. It used a tremendous amount of fuel, more than I thought it should. Is this just how they work or am I doing something wrong

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big_load
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by big_load » Jul 08 2013 7:26 pm

azbackpackr wrote:I'm pretty sure that both alcohol burning soda can stoves and wood burning stoves are not allowable during fire restrictions.
That's right. I use one when I can, but otherwise use a canister.

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beterarcher
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by beterarcher » Jul 08 2013 9:19 pm

azbackpackr wrote:alcohol burning soda can stoves
That doesn't make much sense since you can use pump up liquid fuel stoves and propane stoves. But then again, there are quite a few laws that don't make sense. :roll:
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big_load
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by big_load » Jul 08 2013 9:30 pm

beterarcher wrote:
azbackpackr wrote:alcohol burning soda can stoves
That doesn't make much sense since you can use pump up liquid fuel stoves and propane stoves. But then again, there are quite a few laws that don't make sense. :roll:
The rationale is that alcohol and wood stoves lack a turn-off valve. There's an argument to be made for the ease of smothering using the pot you're cooking in, but I accept that the need to do so effectively in fairly short order represents a greater risk.

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Bradshaws
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by Bradshaws » Jul 08 2013 9:56 pm

I've made several different alcohol stoves and they all worked well. But... I don't like how easily they can be spilt while lit. That's why I don't use one. ( :stop: every time I've spilt mine, it was my fault) and I was very lucky that I had cleared enough area to keep the flame controlled. A wood burning stove seems like it would safer(for me) than compressed(gas) or liquid fuel, it also looks fun and somewhat charming. Single serving camp fire ;)
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Nighthiker
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by Nighthiker » Dec 15 2016 5:14 pm

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I was able to obtain an adaptor for my Hank Roberts Mark III mini stove
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Nighthiker
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by Nighthiker » Dec 15 2016 5:17 pm

Purchased this stove many years ago, I think at FedMart. The burner is labeled Grill.
griil2.jpg
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Nighthiker
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by Nighthiker » Dec 15 2016 5:19 pm

Another stove that was $ 11.95 in the early 70's over $ 200 today.
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Nighthiker
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by Nighthiker » Dec 15 2016 5:21 pm

Newer version of the Grasshopper stove. The older ones used the long narrow LPG cylinders and the newer version uses the common 1 lb. cylinder.
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Sredfield
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by Sredfield » Dec 15 2016 8:57 pm

Started on my last GAZ canister last time out. Wish I could find a source.
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big_load
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by big_load » Dec 15 2016 9:17 pm

@Sredfield
I'll post the next time I see one. One of our local outfitters finally ran out two years ago, but there's still some out there.

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azbackpackr
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by azbackpackr » Dec 16 2016 8:35 am

My trusty MSR Pocketrocket, had for years, easy to use, (although the canisters are a bit impractical, I admit, and not eco-friendly) finally had to be tossed, and I got a new one for less than I paid for the first one. What happened was, the threads went bad where you screw it on to the gas canister. I tried it on several canisters with same result.

I have all the materials to make a cat food can alcohol stove as shown on YouTube by Andrew Skurka. But I just don't enjoy making things these days, so they are jumbled there in a storage box.
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MtnBart01
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by MtnBart01 » Dec 16 2016 9:51 pm

@azbackpackr
It takes less than 5 minutes. You could have made it in the time it took to write the previous post. Ha!
LET IT SNOW! Let it SNOW! Let it Snow!

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azbackpackr
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by azbackpackr » Dec 17 2016 3:39 am

:next: @MtnBart01
I hardly think so. I type 70 words a minute.

But since you're going to shame me into actually getting around to it, maybe I will...soon. Soon! ;) I'm making my New Year's list of unfinished projects and things I want to work on this spring, so I'll add it to that list! (I really should make the stove today. That way I could try it out on my next little adventure, which begins on Tuesday.)

Keeping things on topic, here's that how-to video with Andrew Skurka making the stove: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pajkt594Ruw
There is a point of no return unremarked at the time in most lives. Graham Greene The Comedians
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MtnBart01
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by MtnBart01 » Dec 17 2016 8:48 am

@azbackpackr
A wide diameter pot rather than a narrow tall jet boil shaped pot works much better with the cat tin design along with a wind screen. An offshore worker makes penny stoves out of the soda pop cans he drinks while watching tv. They are a little more time intensive, but I have to test the one he gave me.
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LET IT SNOW! Let it SNOW! Let it Snow!

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jonathanpatt
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by jonathanpatt » Dec 17 2016 12:45 pm

I've mostly been using a BRS-3000T for the past year, it's a Chinese 25 gram titanium canister stove that is the smallest and lightest canister stove I've ever seen, and works great. It does have a smallish fold out potstand, so maybe not as stable for large pots, but works well for smaller, and averages $10 to $15 depending on where you get it from.

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AZ_Step
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by AZ_Step » Dec 20 2016 3:27 pm

I’ve been using a solo stove Lite (wood burning stove) for over 5 years and haven’t had any problems. It uses small kindling that I can find almost anywhere and I only need a handful to boil water. If I’m in an area that has fire restrictions I use solid fuel tablets like Esbit. I like the stainless steel construction and it nestles in the pot nicely. The only good/bad thing that found is that if left alone the coals die out in just a few minutes.
I don’t recommend using it indoors but then again I wouldn’t recommend using any of the stove mentioned earlier indoors either.

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te_wa
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by te_wa » Dec 20 2016 7:10 pm

and the SectionHiker reader's choice awards for 2016 go to:
Emberlit FireAnt Wood Stove
Esbit Pocket Folding Stove
Jetboil Flash Cooking System
MSR Pocket Rocket
MSR Whisperlite Universal Stove
MSR Windburner Stove
Snowpeak GigaPower Auto
Solo Stove Lite
Trangia Spirit Burner
:D

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Nighthiker
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Re: Backpacking Stoves.

Post by Nighthiker » Jan 22 2018 8:05 am

I noted folks who bicycle tour prefer alcohol fueled stoves. I recently acquired a Trangia Spirit burner alcohol fuel stove and a much improved version of the GI canteen cup stand. The stove stand, canteen cup and canteen nest in a canteen cover. I used a 8 oz. Stanley Flask for extra fuel. The canteen cup stove stand can also be placed in campfire coals as well.
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I found these small spatulas at a Ace hardware.
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jk

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