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Touring bicycle build

Cycling to Mountain Biking

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Nighthiker
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Touring bicycle build

Post by Nighthiker » Apr 10 2011 5:24 am

Rebuilding a 1999 Trek 520 Touring bicycle. Bike was neglected but the frame still still solid. Took the bike apart and had the frame and fork powder coated in copper, handlebar and stem in black. Since this was a rebuild I have been ordering new components, though I did rebuild the wheel hubs as most of the bike's components were to far gone to salvage. For components I selected Deore, though they don't make bar end shifters and a little trouble finding a Deore headset. Should start assembly next week and finished by the end of the month. Love the " Century Series" Trek's, also have a pair of 84 Trek 660 that I rebuilt and a Trek 510 and also have Schwinn's and Giants in the fleet. In addition to road cycling I like to mtn bike camp.
jk

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azbackpackr
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by azbackpackr » Apr 10 2011 8:16 am

I have a question about touring bikes and road bikes. Why the lowslung curved racing handlebars when virtually NO ONE uses the lower part of the bars, since they all have a way to reach the brakes on the top of the bar anyway? On my roadbike I can barely even reach the lower rungs of the bars. I can't bend down that far, and then expect my neck to bend up to see. And I see very few other people ever use that part of the bars when I ride with a group. I am thinking about putting mtn. bike handle bars on it. I have no idea why I have to have those incredibly uncomfortable bars, which hurt my wrists and wear me out. Last time I rode it was in Yuma in January, and my friend thought I couldn't keep up with her because my legs were tired. My legs were fine. It was my hands and wrists that were killing me.

I have asked road bike people if they ever put their hands on the bottom rungs, and most of them say no. So I have to believe that the reason those handlebars are still sold is because people think they are supposed to look like Lance Armstrong. Most of the people I ride with in Yuma have those triathlon things they rest their arms on.
There is a point of no return unremarked at the time in most lives. Graham Greene The Comedians
A clean house is a sign of a misspent life.

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big_load
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by big_load » Apr 10 2011 11:11 am

@Nighthiker Cool! Maybe someday I'll rebuild my bike. I really like bar end shifters. When I got mine back in the mid-70s there weren't many to chose from and I didn't know anyone else that used them.


@azbackpackr
Back in my riding days, I used the curve on the bottom rung for sprints and fast downhills. I never used the straight part of the bottom.

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desert_boonie
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by desert_boonie » Apr 10 2011 4:43 pm

azbackpackr wrote:I have a question about touring bikes and road bikes. Why the lowslung curved racing handlebars when virtually NO ONE uses the lower part of the bars, since they all have a way to reach the brakes on the top of the bar anyway? On my roadbike I can barely even reach the lower rungs of the bars. I can't bend down that far, and then expect my neck to bend up to see. And I see very few other people ever use that part of the bars when I ride with a group. I am thinking about putting mtn. bike handle bars on it. I have no idea why I have to have those incredibly uncomfortable bars, which hurt my wrists and wear me out. Last time I rode it was in Yuma in January, and my friend thought I couldn't keep up with her because my legs were tired. My legs were fine. It was my hands and wrists that were killing me.

I have asked road bike people if they ever put their hands on the bottom rungs, and most of them say no. So I have to believe that the reason those handlebars are still sold is because people think they are supposed to look like Lance Armstrong. Most of the people I ride with in Yuma have those triathlon things they rest their arms on.
That part of the bar is for sprinting and you will really only see it used at the end of a race when the riders break for the finish line. Getting used to a bike is a task, especially with your grip. On a road bike you want to change your grip position often and it helps to wear cycling gloves as well for extra comfort. I like to shift grips from the lever to the bar every 5-10 minutes. If you start to get numb shake your hands out, it takes time to get used to it but it shouldn't feel uncomfortable if your bike is the right size to you. The triathlon aerobars are used for sprinting the entire time and will be even more uncomfortable to riders not used to them. I only like the aerobars on tri-bikes and not on road bikes as it puts you in an unnatural position.
"Never Satisfied"

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azbackpackr
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by azbackpackr » Apr 10 2011 4:53 pm

yes, I am going to take my bike in to see if I can get it refitted. A different stem, etc. (I probably won't put mtn. bike handlebars on it, actually, but would get the bar padding.) I do wear padded gloves. I do have joint issues in my wrists and hands. The bike is a GIant OC3 and I bought it used. I am very small and it is size 42 cm, I think, and it still may be too big for me with that stem. I found out there is an expert fitter here in Flag and I plan to take it there for some trouble-shooting. Hopefully that will help solve the problem.
There is a point of no return unremarked at the time in most lives. Graham Greene The Comedians
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maxpower
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by maxpower » Apr 10 2011 10:11 pm

Triathlon bars are comfy once you get used to them. The down side is that if you have the bar end shifters on the ends of the aero bars, you lose the STI shifting setup that is built into the standard road bike brake handles. I rode my tri-bike for 6 years (Cannondale Ironman 2000) before selling it last year after I quit doing triathlons. Now I'm riding a Trek Madone standard road bike. I forgot how much I missed the STI shifters until recently!! :y:

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azbackpackr
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by azbackpackr » Apr 11 2011 5:15 am

My shifters are in the brake handles. Seems to work fine. I wouldn't want them on the bar ends because then I would have to move my hands. Doesn't make sense to me.
There is a point of no return unremarked at the time in most lives. Graham Greene The Comedians
A clean house is a sign of a misspent life.

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maxpower
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by maxpower » Apr 11 2011 10:38 am

azbackpackr wrote:My shifters are in the brake handles. Seems to work fine. I wouldn't want them on the bar ends because then I would have to move my hands. Doesn't make sense to me.
I like mine on the brakes as well. But most triathletes rarely use the brakes during an event, and they want to stay in the aero position as much as possible, hence the bar-end shifters on the aero bars. Look at the Tour de France time trial bikes....they have the shifters on the aero bars as well for the same reason.

Eternal warrior
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by Eternal warrior » Apr 28 2011 3:46 pm

Sounds like a fun project! I would love to get a road bike. Mtn. bike camping sounds awesome! I'm asuming it's basically backpacking" on a mtn. bike. Where do you like to go to do that? Do you carry it all in your backpack or do you have saddle bags?

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kingsnake
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by kingsnake » Apr 28 2011 4:52 pm

Not related to touring bike building, but this is a great site -- kinda like HAZ -- where people post their tour logs. Some great reads! http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/
http://prestonm.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false; : Everyone's enjoyment of the outdoors is different and should be equally honored.

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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by imike » Apr 29 2011 12:39 pm

you may want to register with Warmshowers.com... host cycling tourist passing through your area. Nice way to connect with some interesting folks.
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Nighthiker
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Re: Touring bicycle build

Post by Nighthiker » Apr 29 2011 4:15 pm

Its done, need to add a few accessories. Riding in the Desert Classic (on the OCR1) sat and a club ride sun and I will be riding the Trek 510.
jk

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