Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Moderator: HAZ - Moderators

Linked Guides none
Linked Areas none
Post Reply
User avatar
rushthezeppelin
Posts: 371
Joined: Oct 25 2008 2:42 am
City, State: Tempe, AZ

Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by rushthezeppelin » Dec 15 2008 2:02 am

While plowing through tons of the stuff on our Upper Peter's Canyon Loop, tewa and I started wondering if catclaw is native to the area or if it is an introduced species that has run rampant. Anybody know for sure?

User avatar
joebartels
Posts: 6996
Joined: Nov 20 1996 12:00 pm
City, State: Phoenix, AZ

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by joebartels » Dec 15 2008 4:17 am

Carlson says no
Hike Arizona it ROCKS!

User avatar
rally_toad
Posts: 579
Joined: May 17 2007 8:06 pm
City, State: Boulder City, NV

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by rally_toad » Dec 15 2008 7:14 am

Google or Wiki Acacia gregii, the wiki page says it is native from Northern Mexico to Southern Utah, so I would guess that the catclaw found in the superstitions is native.
"Who are you guys??!!" -Farnsworth

User avatar
big_load
Posts: 4347
Joined: Oct 28 2003 11:20 am
City, State: Andover, NJ

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by big_load » Dec 15 2008 9:20 am

There are a couple other species that people commonly refer to as catclaw. At least a few of them are listed as native in "A Natural History of the Sonoran Desert".

By the way, I opted out of crossing Peter's Mesa last month, figuring the catclaw would be nearly as awful as it was in LaBarge Canyon.

User avatar
te_wa
Posts: 2481
Joined: Aug 22 2003 9:16 pm
City, State: 221b Baker St.

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by te_wa » Dec 15 2008 9:22 am

i think i have seen what are commonly called catsclaw in 2 species, mimosa and acacia. both hurt!
:D

User avatar
SuperstitionGuy
Posts: 1563
Joined: Dec 25 2005 8:24 pm
City, State: Apache Junction, Arizona

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by SuperstitionGuy » Dec 15 2008 10:25 am

rushthezeppelin wrote:While plowing through tons of the stuff on our Upper Peter's Canyon Loop, tewa and I started wondering if catclaw is native to the area or if it is an introduced species that has run rampant. Anybody know for sure?
No - it was planted by the USFS to discourage HAZ users from experiencing the wilderness.... :GB:
A man's body may grow old, but inside his spirit can still be as young and restless as ever.
- Garth McCann from the movie Second Hand Lions

Another victim of Pixel Trivia.

Current avatar courtesy of Snakemarks

User avatar
big_load
Posts: 4347
Joined: Oct 28 2003 11:20 am
City, State: Andover, NJ

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by big_load » Dec 15 2008 11:49 am

My favorite catclaw episode was getting tangled in a thicket. It was stuck to my back and my front and both arms, and the worst was a big one hooked into the skin on my bicep that I couldn't work loose. It was trying to pull the cover right off me and it hurt almost bad enough for me to say something. I had to pull out my knife and cut the branch while the hook was in me, and I couldn't keep every stroke from making it pull harder.

User avatar
rally_toad
Posts: 579
Joined: May 17 2007 8:06 pm
City, State: Boulder City, NV

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by rally_toad » Dec 15 2008 1:07 pm

After going on the JF-Fish Creek loop with the Supes HAZ wrecking crew, I had a small catclaw thorn stuck in my finger for at least a week, it would not come out.
"Who are you guys??!!" -Farnsworth

User avatar
writelots
Posts: 967
Joined: Nov 22 2005 2:20 pm
City, State: Tucson, AZ
Contact:

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by writelots » Dec 15 2008 1:22 pm

The most common plant called catsclaw is acacia greggii Catsclaw Acacia - It's native to the southwest, pretty much anywhere in the Sonoran Desert below 5000', though it's thickest on slopes near riparian areas. Not only is it a great wildlife habitat plant, but it was used as a food source by Native Americans. Here in Pima County, it's actually a protected species - if you rip one out while you're building your house, you have to plant 2 more in it's place. Hard to imagine it needs our protection - it seems to have a pretty effective home security system.

Some people also call wait-a-minute bush catsclaw, but it's a different species mimosa biuncifera. It also has that evil recurved thorn - though it tends to be a smaller bush, closer to the ground, and a little more delicate (if something so viscious can be thought of that way) They're both in the same family as the mesquites, palo verdes and other acacias found all over the Sonoran...
-----------------------------------
It troubles me that these days no matter how cynical you become, it's never enough to keep up
- Lilly Tomlin

User avatar
nonot
Posts: 1922
Joined: Nov 18 2005 11:52 pm
City, State: Phoenix, AZ

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by nonot » Dec 15 2008 6:08 pm

I just pulled out a thorn tip from our Rough Canyon trip a month ago last night...that sucker was in there deep.

How do you make it into a food source...eat only the animals it ensnares??
http://hikearizona.com/garmin_maps.php

Hike Arizona it is full of sharp, pointy, ankle-twisting, HAZmaster crushing ROCKS!!
Hike Arizona it is full of sharp, pointy, shin-stabbing, skin-shredding plants!
Hike Arizona it is full of striking, biting, stabbing, venomous wildlife!

User avatar
SuperstitionGuy
Posts: 1563
Joined: Dec 25 2005 8:24 pm
City, State: Apache Junction, Arizona

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by SuperstitionGuy » Dec 15 2008 9:19 pm

rally_toad wrote:After going on the JF-Fish Creek loop with the Supes HAZ wrecking crew, I had a small catclaw thorn stuck in my finger for at least a week, it would not come out.
If you had been carrying the Extractor snake bit kit you could have sucked it out at the time and saved a lot of pain and suffering.. :bigth:
A man's body may grow old, but inside his spirit can still be as young and restless as ever.
- Garth McCann from the movie Second Hand Lions

Another victim of Pixel Trivia.

Current avatar courtesy of Snakemarks

User avatar
nonot
Posts: 1922
Joined: Nov 18 2005 11:52 pm
City, State: Phoenix, AZ

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by nonot » Dec 15 2008 11:36 pm

Yeah, and it would have helped with te-wa biting you every 20 minutes too :o
http://hikearizona.com/garmin_maps.php

Hike Arizona it is full of sharp, pointy, ankle-twisting, HAZmaster crushing ROCKS!!
Hike Arizona it is full of sharp, pointy, shin-stabbing, skin-shredding plants!
Hike Arizona it is full of striking, biting, stabbing, venomous wildlife!

User avatar
big_load
Posts: 4347
Joined: Oct 28 2003 11:20 am
City, State: Andover, NJ

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by big_load » Dec 15 2008 11:48 pm

SuperstitionGuy wrote:If you had been carrying the Extractor snake bit kit you could have sucked it out at the time and saved a lot of pain and suffering..
The last place I dug a catclaw hook from would have been really hard to reach with an extractor, unless I had a really brave volunteer. :sl:

User avatar
nonot
Posts: 1922
Joined: Nov 18 2005 11:52 pm
City, State: Phoenix, AZ

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by nonot » Dec 15 2008 11:53 pm

The last place I dug a catclaw hook from would have been really hard to reach with an extractor, unless I had a really brave volunteer.
Is this the segue to merge this with the hiking nekkid thread? :scared:
http://hikearizona.com/garmin_maps.php

Hike Arizona it is full of sharp, pointy, ankle-twisting, HAZmaster crushing ROCKS!!
Hike Arizona it is full of sharp, pointy, shin-stabbing, skin-shredding plants!
Hike Arizona it is full of striking, biting, stabbing, venomous wildlife!

User avatar
rushthezeppelin
Posts: 371
Joined: Oct 25 2008 2:42 am
City, State: Tempe, AZ

Re: Are catclaws native to the Supes?

Post by rushthezeppelin » Dec 16 2008 11:01 am

writelots wrote:Here in Pima County, it's actually a protected species - if you rip one out while you're building your house, you have to plant 2 more in it's place. Hard to imagine it needs our protection - it seems to have a pretty effective home security system.
Why does it need protection? My god the stuff grows like wildfire and it protects itself pretty well, I just can't see it needing our help to survive :?

Post Reply

Return to “Flora”


cron