Trail Etiquette question

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DarthStiller
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Trail Etiquette question

Post by DarthStiller » Oct 22 2007 11:15 am

Does anyone know if the trails in the Hawes Pass area are specifically for bikers? I had an unfortunate run in at the start with a rather ignorant and rude mountain biker. We had been hiking about 10 min. when this biker was coming in the opposite direction. We both were approaching a bend in the trail and he start to speed up to get around it before I did and made no effort whatsoever to yield the trail. On top of that, he was yelling something at me as he passed by and brushed me. Once he passed us, he stopped and said that the trails there are mainly for bikers and that I was supposed to yield the trail. I said , “Bikers yield to hikers”. He repeated that the trails were mainly for bikers and that I needed to learn the rules. I have never heard of any trails where hikers are supposed to yield to bikers. Especially ones maintained by the National Forest Service, as this was in the Tonto. I have seen on maps for county parks tracks that are dedicated exclusively for bikers, but no hikers are allowed on those at all. I found it really unbelievable that this guy would take the stance that the rules were the opposite of what is known as common trail etiquette, not to mention how he attempted to bump me off the trail while carrying a full pack.

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Alston_Neal
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by Alston_Neal » Mar 05 2013 10:08 am

I yield to young women wearing Spandex.... ;)
In Japan they say only old people and crazy people hike mountains...........yep


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chumley
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by chumley » Mar 05 2013 10:36 am

Alston Neal wrote:I yield to young women wearing Spandex.... ;)
The age has very little to do with the shape. I've seen some young women who don't belong in Spandex. More frequently when traveling through New Jersey. ;)
Highway to hell

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Alston_Neal
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by Alston_Neal » Mar 05 2013 11:33 am

chumley wrote:
Alston Neal wrote:I yield to young women wearing Spandex.... ;)
The age has very little to do with the shape. I've seen some young women who don't belong in Spandex. More frequently when traveling through New Jersey. ;)
:sk: :yuck: :sk: :out:
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Trishness
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by Trishness » Mar 08 2013 8:12 pm

Alston Neal wrote:I yield to young women wearing Spandex.... ;)
What about middle aged women wearing spanx?
:)
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Alston_Neal
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by Alston_Neal » Mar 09 2013 10:23 am

Hmmmmm middle aged women and spanx.
Ok so the first thing that pops into my demented mind is 50 Shades of Gray atop Camelback Mtn.
In Japan they say only old people and crazy people hike mountains...........yep


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azbackpackr
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by azbackpackr » Mar 09 2013 11:00 am

I mountain bike. I get off the bike AND I remove my helmet. Riders have told me that sometimes the horse is spooked more by the helmet than by the bike.

Here is a quote from an article about mountain biking which I wrote, to be published at the end of the month in White Mountain Outdoors Magazine: "A fractious horse can gravely injure or kill a rider, so it is not only proper etiquette, but is also the cyclist’s absolute moral duty to be respectful of horseback riders. I mean that."

I can't imagine running INTO a horse. I live in the White Mountains which for the most part are gentle, rolling and very open country, so I can see the horses a long way off, and decide what to do.

I used to ride quite a bit. Going on a multiday horse or mule pack trip is high on my bucket list. I am going to say that here, since there are some riders reading it. (Hint hint hint!) I have looked into a commercial guided trip in the Gila Wilderness, but it costs about $900 for five days. I can't afford that. (Hint hint)
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outdoor_lover
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by outdoor_lover » Mar 09 2013 12:10 pm

I know that Bikes are supposed to yield to Hikers, but if I see a Bike coming and I can step off, I do. It's much harder for them to stop if they're smoking down a Trail and much harder for them to get their momentum back if they're going uphill. With that being said, I am so grateful for Bikers that put bells on their Bikes so I can hear them coming. I almost got run over and knocked off the National Trail in a bad spot once, coming around a blind corner. :o It's also helpful when they're coming up behind me, as I can hear them coming and it gives me time to step off.

Horses should always be yielded to, there should be no debate. They are animals and I don't care how well trained they are, not even the owner can completely predict their behavior. Plus there can be very few areas on a Trail that are big enough for a Horse to actually step off the Trail. Many people do not realize that a Horse/Mule have limited eyesight directly to the front, so things in front of them will be more likely to spook them.

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azbackpackr
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by azbackpackr » Mar 09 2013 12:14 pm

I like the old-fashioned way you capitalize nouns.

I notice things like that. Of course, we all know I notice other things, too, such as typing "lightening" when you meant "lightning," etc. etc. etc.
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outdoor_lover
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by outdoor_lover » Mar 09 2013 12:16 pm

@azbackpackr I never used to do that, I don't really know what made me start or when. It drives Joe crazy..... :sl:
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty & well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, totally worn out & proclaiming, "Wow What a Ride!"

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beterarcher
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by beterarcher » Mar 09 2013 12:19 pm

Outdoor Lover wrote:Many people do not realize that a Horse/Mule have limited eyesight directly to the front, so things in front of them will be more likely to spook them.
I've also heard that they see things a lot biggerthan we puny humans doo
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chumley
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by chumley » Mar 09 2013 12:20 pm

azbackpackr wrote:such as typing "lightening" when you meant "lightning," etc. etc. etc.
](*,)
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azbackpackr
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by azbackpackr » Mar 09 2013 12:25 pm

Outdoor Lover wrote:@azbackpackr I never used to do that, I don't really know what made me start or when. It drives Joe crazy..... :sl:
It's quaint! It went out of fashion many years ago, but you will still find it in old books from the 1800's.
There is a point of no return unremarked at the time in most lives. Graham Greene The Comedians
A clean house is a sign of a misspent life.

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DarthStiller
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Re: Trail Etiquette question

Post by DarthStiller » Mar 09 2013 8:07 pm

I feel privileged now that I'm in the pantheon of having started a thread that's lived on over the 5 year mark.

I went back and read the beginning, and one thing that I seem to have left out was on that particular hike, I had deliberately worn an overnight backpack and stuffed it full of gear to make it heavier in an attempt to train for the then upcoming Trans-supes hike with te-wa and crew. That heavier and larger pack made me more reluctant than normal to want to hustle off the trail, as well as making the trail even narrower for the both of us. FWIW. This was pretty much the only time I ever made a point of not yielding the trail, which I normally do.

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