Earthquake potential in Pacific Northwest

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azbackpackr
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Earthquake potential in Pacific Northwest

Post by azbackpackr » Jul 14 2015 7:17 am

Probably most of you have read or heard about the possibility of a big earthquake occurring in the Seattle area sometime in the future. The following article explains what may happen. It's not only a good article, it's one of the best articles I've read in some time about any topic. It's also terrifying. I'm not moving there:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/ ... ly-big-one
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big_load
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Re: Earthquake potential in Pacific Northwest

Post by big_load » Jul 24 2015 8:55 am

I haven't followed this story too closely, but I took it for granted that even the general public was aware of the massive earthquake potential in that region, if not the previous occurrence of rather frequent massive earthquakes.

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SpiderLegs
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Re: Earthquake potential in Pacific Northwest

Post by SpiderLegs » Jul 24 2015 1:04 pm

big_load wrote:I haven't followed this story too closely, but I took it for granted that even the general public was aware of the massive earthquake potential in that region, if not the previous occurrence of rather frequent massive earthquakes.
I figured it out the first time I visited the region and noticed all the signs designating various roads as evacuation routes.
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Re: Earthquake potential in Pacific Northwest

Post by rcorfman » Jul 24 2015 1:05 pm

azbackpackr wrote:It rains too much and I might melt.
We used to joke that the Seattle Rain Festival ran from Nov. 1 to Oct. 31. But seriously, when it's nice there it can't be beat.
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SkyIslandHiker
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Re: Earthquake potential in Pacific Northwest

Post by SkyIslandHiker » Jul 24 2015 2:28 pm

azbackpackr wrote:But I'm still not moving to the Pacific Northwest. The climate would not agree with me at all.
There are two distinct climates in the Pacific Northwest. For example most outsiders don't realize that there is more high desert in Oregon than rain forest. The Cascades form a huge rain barrier and Central & Eastern Oregon are much like Northern Arizona. Outdoor mecca Bend in Central Oregon boasts almost 300 days of sunshine per year with annual precipitation of just 12" most of which comes as snow in the winter. Bend/Central Oregon is a four-season paradise for hikers, mountain bikers, kayakers, and snow recreation. It's also well east of the Cascadia I-5 "toast" line. On the downside Central Oregon's climate may be too cool for some and Bend's cost of living has gotten a little pricey from "Californication".

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Re: Earthquake potential in Pacific Northwest

Post by rcorfman » Jul 24 2015 3:22 pm

SkyIslandHiker wrote:There are two distinct climates in the Pacific Northwest. For example most outsiders don't realize that there is more high desert in Oregon than rain forest. The Cascades form a huge rain barrier and Central & Eastern Oregon are much like Northern Arizona. Outdoor mecca Bend in Central Oregon boasts almost 300 days of sunshine per year with annual precipitation of just 12" most of which comes as snow in the winter. Bend/Central Oregon is a four-season paradise for hikers, mountain bikers, kayakers, and snow recreation. It's also well east of the Cascadia I-5 "toast" line. On the downside Central Oregon's climate may be too cool for some and Bend's cost of living has gotten a little pricey from "Californication".
I've always considered the Pacific Northwest to lie completely west of the Cascade Crest. All of Oregon's high desert lies east of the Cascade Crest so I don't consider it part of the PNW. I agree with your description of the climate differences between the east or west side of the Cascade Crest.
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azbackpackr
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Re: Earthquake potential in Pacific Northwest

Post by azbackpackr » Jul 24 2015 3:58 pm

I agree as well, but it's still cold up there in winter. My brother lives in the sage desert near Challis, Idaho. I visited him in November last year. It was very cold there. I've spent summers in N. Nevada in the Santa Rosa Range, just south of the Oregon border, so I'm familiar with that part as well.

I could not live there in winter. Or, I should say, why would I want to? It definitely gets down to freezing temperatures in those inland deserts east of the Cascades. Anyway, I subjected myself to living in the White Mountains in Eagar for 13 years. Hated the fact I had to wear a jacket and shoes so much of the year. Shoes? Sheesh. I can't believe how many people wear shoes in SUMMER when they don't have to. I hate shoes.

I now live in Williams, but, just like last year, I will head for the lower Colorado River sometime around October, and will stay there until the nighttime temperatures on the Plateau are above freezing.
There is a point of no return unremarked at the time in most lives. Graham Greene The Comedians
A clean house is a sign of a misspent life.

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