Redflex Corruption

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Jim_H
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Redflex Corruption

Post by Jim_H » Nov 29 2009 12:53 pm

I got a ticket in the mail yesterday. Here is the "evidence" against me. If I were doing 79 in the 65 as claimed, I would have been in the trunk of the car in front of me. I am car #2 behind the truck. A car from Colorado is passing me, and he may have been going 79, but I don't know. If he was, it looks like I got his ticket.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HH3NTQrE12k

AZDPS and Redflex are clearly lying about the quality control they claim to do, and they have no problems sending a ticket to an innocent victim to help tighten the budget problem and fatten the corporate profits. If they looked at the videos as they claim to do, I never would have gotten this.

Something tells me I am not the first person to whom this has happened. Is anyone interested in starting a class action lawsuit against a company which gathers evidence for the state without a private investigators license, and has profit as its motive behind "law enforcement"?
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Jul 29 2016 11:01 am

big_load wrote:
hikeaz wrote:Baker resigned as vice chairman of the State Commission for Judicial Conduct after the scandal broke.
It's nice to know that NJ hasn't totally cornered the market on corruption.
Seems you guys (N.J.) have all sorts of freedoms....... You can even use your high-beams on an empty road!

New Jersey Supreme Court Allows High Beams On Empty Roads
7/26/16
The High court in New Jersey finds it unreasonable for police to pull over motorists for using high beams when there is no oncoming traffic.

Driving on a deserted road with high beams on is perfectly legal in New Jersey, according to a ruling from the state's highest court. The justices last week unanimously decided to drop charges against Al-Sharif Scriven, who had been pulled over on November 3, 2013 for driving with her headlights on the brightest setting.

Essex County Sheriff's Officer David Cohen initiated the disputed traffic stop, "just to basically, educate the driver to advise her that her high beams [were] on... you can't drive with your high beams on," he testified. New Jersey law, however, only requires that drivers dim their high beams when there is oncoming traffic.

Officer Cohen was stopped on the side of the road waiting to have another vehicle towed away when he saw Scriven's automobile, which was neither speeding nor doing anything else out of the ordinary. The officer, however, was irritated at being "blinded" by the light, so he ordered the vehicle to pull over so he could issue a ticket for unlawful use of the high beam. The state Supreme Court rejected the officer's conclusion that a law had been broken.

"The high-beam statute is unambiguous in its language and meaning to both the public and police," Justice Barry T. Albin wrote for the court. "We reject the state's argument that an unoccupied police vehicle parked on a perpendicular street and a police officer on foot, collectively or individually, count as an 'oncoming' vehicle under the statute. We also do not find the state's argument to be an objectively reasonable interpretation of the statute."

Prosecutors had argued that the US Supreme Court's Heien decision allows officers to conduct searches even when they pull over a motorist who has done nothing wrong (view case). The Heien precedent, however, only applies to reasonable interpretations. The court found the officer's explanation that car thieves commonly drive with high beams on to "dazzle" law enforcement to be unpersuasive.

"That generalization, standing alone, would justify the stop of any car using high beams at nighttime in an urban setting," Justice Albin wrote. The suspicion necessary to justify a stop must not only be reasonable, but also particularized."
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chumley
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by chumley » Jul 29 2016 11:29 am

@hikeaz
Driving must be a very stressful activity for you. :scared:
smoke it

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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by big_load » Jul 29 2016 12:16 pm

It will be nice to someday have NJ in my rear view mirror for the last time. I suppose I'll eventually miss the foliage, but not the end-of-the-month quota sprees.

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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Aug 30 2016 8:33 am

John P. Raphael became the first participant in the unfolding red light camera scandal to be put behind bars last week. The 61-year-old lobbyist for Redflex Traffic Systems of Australia on Thursday began serving his sentence at Williamsburg Federal Correctional Institute in Salter, South Carolina wearing a jumpsuit stamped with his new identity, prisoner number 73379-061. Convicted of bribing Columbus, OH officials, he was sentenced to merely 15 months for his crimes; although he was forced to sell his bar (Patrick J's) to pay legal fees and back taxes - not having even FILED taxes for 2004 through 2014. Geez..... these photo scamera guys hang with some real gems - not to mention the mayors and city council members.

He will soon be joined by fellow shyster John Bills, the former Chicago, Illinois transportation official who was sentenced to ten years on Monday. Bills was convicted last year of taking $2 million in bribes from Redflex in return for his help in securing the most lucrative red light camera contract in the country.
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Sep 29 2016 12:51 pm

Virginia: Group Seeks Sanctions Against Unauthorized Speed Camera Use

Posted: 29 Sep 2016 01:23 AM PDT

Speed cameras are banned in Virginia, but that did not stop the insurance industry from deploying them on state highways.

As part of an effort to promote the issuance of speeding tickets, the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) and the for-profit contractor Brekford set up ten radar units that they used to photograph the faces of motorists and identify them through Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) records. The group used the data collected to call for lowering of speed limits.

The National Motorists Association (NMA) noticed one flaw with the IIHS plan -- IIHS never asked for permission to set up the cameras. On Wednesday the group filed a complaint with the Commonwealth Transportation Board, which has jurisdiction over Virginia highways.

"It is a no-brainer for a motorist rights organization to challenge what appears to have been the unlawful surveillance by speed camera of tens of thousands of drivers on Virginia state roads," NMA president Gary Biller told TheNewspaper. "Drivers need protection against the insurance industry drilling down into our personal records with impunity under the guise of "research". It is our hope that the Virginia Commonwealth Transportation Board will fully investigate whether IIHS and Brekford spied on motorists without authorization and assign the appropriate penalties."

Under Virginia's administrative code, it is unlawful for "work of any nature" to be performed on a state road without a permit from the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT). The NMA asked VDOT for a copy of any permits issued to IIHS or Brekford, but, according to the agency, none were issued.

Brekford and IIHS set up the speed cameras on Interstate 66, Prince William Parkway, George Washington Parkway, Fairfax County Parkway, Columbia Pike, Leesburg Pike and US 50. The experiment photographed 65,000 motorists.

"What makes this especially egregious to advocates of motorists' rights is that the information gathered in Northern Virginia by IIHS and Brekford was used as justification to examine sensitive records of individual motorists at driver licensing agencies in multiple states," Biller wrote in his complaint. "This is not only a violation of privacy, but of trust in state institutions to protect DMV records from access through unsanctioned means."

A spokesman for VDOT confirmed to TheNewspaper that a land use permit would also be required for anyone wishing to install a speed camera. In 2014, DMV Commissioner Richard D. Holcomb did authorize the release of personal DMV records of Virginia motorists for the IIHS media campaign.
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by chumley » Sep 29 2016 1:00 pm

I'm hoping the next presidential debate features a question about photo traffic enforcement. The candidates need to be on the record on this issue.
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Oct 26 2016 11:08 am

No Safety Benefit From San Francisco, California Cameras

26 Oct 2016 01:03 AM PDT

Extending the length of yellow times and improving traffic signal visibility did far more to reduce accidents than installing red light cameras in San Francisco, California. That was the conclusion of the latest annual report from the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency, which documented injury broadside collision rates at photo enforced intersections over twenty years.

"Seventh and Mission Streets shows how a red light camera installation can at times leave an intersection's collision trends unchanged," the report explained. "Seventh and Mission was one of the first red light cameras to be installed by the city in 1997."

San Francisco's camera vendor singled out this particular location not only for its ability to churn out violation notices, but also for its above average collision history. Things did not improve there until engineering improvements were made.

"In 1998, after the red light camera had begun operation, the location reported a higher number of collisions and was one of the highest injury collision locations for the city," the report explained. "In 2003 a major signal upgrade along the downtown portion of Mission Street was completed. This upgrade relocated the location of signal poles, installed overhead (mast arm) signals, and installed pedestrian signal indications. Annual injury collisions since the upgrade dropped significantly, suggesting it was the signal engineering upgrade and not the enforcement mechanism that in this case reduced the intersection's injury collision totals."

Collisions clearly were not a factor in the installation decisions at several other locations. At Ninth Street and Howard Street, a red light camera was added to ticket westbound traffic in 2010, even though there had been zero injury broadside collisions in the seven years prior to installation. For a decade prior to the camera installation at Marina Boulevard and Lyon Street, there had only ever been a single accident.

At Fifth Street and Howard Street, the red light camera was installed in 1996. Immediately, the number of injury broadsides jumped from 5 to 9. Then the yellow timing was increased in 1997, and accidents dropped to 3 in 1998. After a major signal upgrade in 1999, accidents fell to between zero and two for the next twelve years. The yellow timing was increased again in 2012, and that fell to between zero and one through 2015.

Last year, Xerox issued 11,851 tickets worth $5.8 million in San Francisco. The agency refused to provide a breakdown of how many tickets were issued to motorists making right-hand turns on red, even though state law requires reporting this information.

Hmm........... So, not only do these ca$h machines not increase safety... they are more often than not placed where they can grab the most ca$h, not where the accidents are most likely to occur..
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by JasonCleghorn » Oct 26 2016 12:50 pm

chumley wrote:I'm hoping the next presidential debate features a question about photo traffic enforcement. The candidates need to be on the record on this issue.
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Nov 03 2016 12:39 pm

Old habits (fleecing the citizenry) die hard........

Court Approves Red Light Camera Class Action Against Chicago, Illinois

Posted: 03 Nov 2016 01:03 AM PDT
Motorists in Chicago, Illinois want refunds for red light camera citations, and they are likely to get them after a Cook County court's ruling Wednesday. Judge Kathleen G. Kennedy certified a class action suit against the city for failing to comply with its own ticketing ordinance. The ruling was handed down just one day after the same lawyers suing the city filed a separate suit designed to nullify the efforts of Mayor Rahm Emanuel (D) to use a new ordinance to evade responsibility for returning the money.

"On the hook for hundreds of millions of dollars in illegal fines and penalties, the city recently passed an ordinance that purports to allow it to issue new tickets and initiate new hearings that will create new liabilities, fines and penalties based on tickets issued years ago that a judge has already ruled were void," motorist attorney Jacie Zolna argued. "Unfortunately for the city... the Illinois Vehicle Code and the Illinois and United States Constitutions specifically prohibit the procedures that the ordinance purports to authorize."

Windy City officials found themselves in a difficult position in February as Cook County Judge Kathleen G. Kennedy found that Chicago failed to comply with the second notice provisions specified in the city's own ordinance. Officials were skipping steps in order to speed up collections.

"The alleged practice of accelerating late fees, without statutory compliance, is sufficient to show a violation of the fundamental principles of justice, equity and good conscience," Judge Kennedy wrote in her February order in the Simpson v. Chicago case.

Wednesday's ruling means that potentially a million vehicle owners could get their money back. Rather than refund $200 million in tickets, the city in September passed a new ordinance establishing a "new and separate assessment of liability" for those citations. The effort was sold to the media as a "do over" that required photo ticket recipients to appear in person to prove their innocence before a city administrative hearing officer for a violation that could have been up to five years old. Zolna points to the state's red light camera law prohibiting this move, since the statute sets firm deadlines for adjudicating photo tickets.

"These laws, which the mayor cannot simply change upon being caught breaking them, render the automated enforcement ordinance illegal and unconstitutional," Zolna said.

The second lawsuit outright accuses the city of corruption for re-writing the law to deny motorists due process rights. The claim is not much of a stretch, considering a city transportation official has been sentenced to ten years in prison for accepting $2 million in bribes from Redflex. The suit asks the court to overturn the "do over" ordinance while the first case continues to seek a final order to refund $200 million to affected motorists.

Gee... no one in the city mentions the purported decrease in safety that the missing cameras will cause........
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KwaiChang
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by KwaiChang » Dec 01 2016 10:33 am

Well here in Rochester NY Redflex is getting booted!!! Sweeeeeeet.

http://13wham.com/news/top-stories/city ... ht-cameras
Out of all the things I've lost I miss my mind the most.....

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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Dec 16 2016 10:13 am

Maryland County Caught With Illegally Short Yellow Times

15 Dec 2016

Montgomery County has often touted itself as among the "best run" photo enforcement program not just in Maryland, but in the nation. A new investigation by the Maryland Drivers Alliance shows how one factor behind the county's ability to generate $23,408,609 in annual revenue is that it has set yellow times below the legal minimum required by both state and federal law.

On September 21, a camera operated by Xerox photographed motorist Peggy Lucero while she was turning left at the intersection of Georgia Avenue and Seminary road. When the flash went off, she knew something was wrong. She believed she made the light. It turns out, she missed it by about six-tenths of a second. The reason she miscalculated was that the signal was timed six-tenths of a second shorter than state law requires.

Lucero's ticket shows the yellow signal offered just 2.9 seconds of warning, which is less than the 3.0 second minimum mandated under federal law. It is also lower than the stricter legal standards in effect in Maryland since May 2015.

"The State Highway Administration does not use yellow change intervals lower than 3.5 seconds," the agency explains in its traffic signal guidelines.

Lucero contacted the motorist rights group about the ticket she received, and the group filed a public records request for the signal timing at the intersection. The documents confirmed the location failed to meet state standards. At another left-turn approach at the same intersection, the left turn signal is correctly set at 4.0 seconds.

The Maryland Drivers Alliance filed another public records request for yellow timing data from individual citations so that it could determine how many violations were caused by the shortened yellow times. County officials refused to disclose this public data unless the group wrote the county a check for $19,000.

"They obviously know nobody could pay such a large fee for this kind of data," Maryland Driver's Alliance spokesman Ron Ely told The Newspaper. "Apparently they don't want anyone who might be critical of their program to obtain enough data to conduct any sort of analysis."

A fraction of a second difference in yellow time can have a significant influence on the number of red light camera citations issued. The majority of straight-through red light "violations" happen when a driver misjudges the end of the yellow light by less than 0.25 seconds -- literally the blink of an eye (view Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) chart). In most cases, a yellow shortened by one second can increase the number of tickets issued by 110 percent, according to TTI (Source http://www.thenewspaper.com/news/02/243.asp)
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Dec 28 2016 11:58 am

Redflex Cuts Prosecution Deal With Feds


The US Department of Justice will close its corruption case against Redflex Traffic Systems in Illinois and Ohio. The department on Wednesday announced it had signed a non-prosecution agreement with the Australian firm, but the deal does not quite mean that Redflex is in the clear.

Under the terms reached with prosecutors, Redflex must pay Columbus, Ohio a $100,000 fine, and it must pay whatever judgment is reached with the city of Chicago, which has a pending $383 million lawsuit against the photo ticketing firm.
Redflex must also cooperate with the Justice Department in any investigation into Redflex activities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New Mexico, Tennessee, Virginia, where the company's former executive vice president admitted he bribed public officials.

Redflex must also cooperate with Australian Federal Police agents investigating the activities of company officials in that country. Redflex must turn over all requested documents and records until these investigations are concluded -- regardless of how long it may take.

"In exchange for Redflex's fulfillment of its obligations under the agreement, DOJ agreed that it will not criminally prosecute Redflex for any of the conduct arising out of investigations in Chicago and Columbus," federal officials explained in a statement.

The deal clearly states that Redflex has not been given a clean bill of health from the US government.

"This agreement does not relate to any potential criminal tax charges, as to which DOJ can make no agreement, and it does not provide any protection against prosecution for any other crimes except as set forth above," the agreement text explains.

As part of the deal, Redflex must also adopt anti-corruption policies and submit four semiannual follow-up reports to the Justice Department over the next two years. The deal is broken if Redflex is found to have committed any felony under federal law.

"If DOJ determines that Redflex has violated any provision of the non-prosecution agreement, Redflex shall be subject to prosecution for any applicable violation of US law, including perjury and obstruction of justice," the department explained.

The former head of US operations for Redflex, Karen L. Finley, was sentenced to thirty months in a federal prison for her role in bribing officials in Chicago and Columbus. She was supposed to report to the US penitentiary in Victorville, California no later than 2pm on Monday, but she won a thirty-day reprieve on Wednesday. Judge Sara L. Ellis agreed to delay Finley's prison reporting date until February 6. Finley claimed she needed time to see a specialist about gastroesophageal reflux disease. (Yeah - this sh$t makes me sick to MY stomach too!)
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Jan 04 2017 2:40 pm

Likely ATS spent all of the money on bribes and in-house bonuses to have any left to pay employees......

Red Light Camera Company Sued Again For Prevailing Wage Violation

Posted: 04 Jan 2017 12:07 AM PST
Another former traffic camera company employee says he has been shortchanged by American Traffic Solutions (ATS). In a new federal lawsuit, George A. Felix alleges the traffic camera vendor forced him to work more than eight hours per day without being paid overtime, and at a rate far below that required under California law.

Felix worked as an electrician for ATS in California from 2009 to 2014. He earned between $20 and $23 per hour setting up and maintaining red light cameras in various municipalities across the state. Felix does not say exactly how much money he believes he is owed, but ATS lawyers estimated the likely total to be in excess of $75,000.

"ATS failed to properly compensate [Felix] for working off-the-clock and overtime," Richard E. Donahoo, attorney for Felix, wrote in his complaint. "[Felix] did not receive compensation for all hours worked over eight per day or forty per week at the required overtime rate."

For publicly funded installation work, California Labor Code Section 1771 requires the payment of "prevailing wages," a rate of compensation inflated far beyond market value for the benefit of labor unions. Under prevailing wage rules, Felix should have received double what he was paid. The official "inside wireman" rate is $39 per hour, or $58 per hour with benefits.

Prevailing wage lawsuits against red light camera companies were inspired by a 2012 ruling by the California Department of Industrial Relations that found ATS and its Australian competitor Redflex Traffic Systems in violation of the state's rules ). ATS last year settled the case filed by another former employee, Matthew G. Jaime, without disclosing the terms. Felix is asking for the unpaid wages, plus interest and attorney's fees.

"ATS... acted with malice, oppression and with an intent to deny [Felix] his wages, all in a willful and conscious disregard for the rights of the plaintiff," Donahoo wrote.

ATS has not formally responded to the lawsuit, beyond having the case transferred from a Los Angeles courtroom to the US District Court for the Central District of California. In past cases, ATS lawyers have denied that red light camera installations fall under the definition of a "public works" project that would trigger the prevailing wage law.
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Jan 05 2017 11:57 am

Florida: State Report Shows Red Light Camera Accidents Up

Red light cameras are on the decline in Florida, but the amount of money the devices collect continues to rise. That was one of the key findings in the year-end report on automated ticketing issued last week by the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. The agency tabulated information supplied by local jurisdictions, reporting that six cities dumped cameras last year, reducing the total number of devices operating statewide by 13 percent.

American Traffic Solutions (ATS), Redflex Traffic Systems of Australia, Xerox and Sensys Gatso Group of Sweden -- the companies that run the photo ticketing programs in the Sunshine State -- responded to that development by adjusting camera settings to more than make up the difference. For 2016, the cameras issued 1,227,927 tickets worth $194,012,466, up 27 percent from the 963,039 tickets issued the previous year. The state government's share of the profit in 2016 was $59,986,371.

According to the survey of cities, 8 percent said a decline in the amount of revenue collected would be considered a sign of success for the program. Another 48 percent said a decline in the number of crashes at a camera-monitored intersection would be a sign of failure. Neither benefit materialized in 2016.

The state's analysis of 148 camera-monitored intersections across 28 jurisdictions found that the number of accidents increased 10 percent overall after ticketing began. Rear end collisions jumped 11.4 percent while angle crashes rose 6.7 percent. These were not mere "fender benders" as fatalities doubled and injury crashes increased 9.3 percent.

The report notes that the figures were not adjusted for traffic levels at intersections as would be required in a more rigorous analysis. In addition, some cities did not include precise location information about each incident and its proximity to the camera.

The Florida legislature is expected to consider bills to repeal the state's authorization of red light cameras when it convenes on March 7. While the state House has passed camera ban bills in the past, the efforts have been blocked by Senate lawmakers after heavy lobbying from local jurisdictions and red light camera companies (presumably because they are more than willing to sell dead and injured taxpayers).
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Feb 08 2017 12:13 pm

Short yellow times meant big cash for the city of Fremont, California
https://www.thenewspaper.com/news/51/5144.asp
Last edited by joebartels on Feb 08 2017 12:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: while there is no copyright notice on thenewspaper.com, there is no share policy such as seen on wikipedia.com
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by flagscott » Feb 08 2017 12:39 pm

@hikeaz , are these posts your writing, or are you cutting and pasting from somewhere? Because if you're cutting and pasting entire articles, that's a copyright violation. You can excerpt a few lines, but you can't copy entire articles.

Just so ya know...

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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Feb 08 2017 2:51 pm

flagscott wrote:@hikeaz , are these posts your writing, or are you cutting and pasting from somewhere? Because if you're cutting and pasting entire articles, that's a copyright violation. You can excerpt a few lines, but you can't copy entire articles.
Just so ya know...
Joe and I have been over this..... any cutting and pasting from the source(s) I use are OK with re-issuing their articles. Thank you for the note and moreso for keeping abreast of how your own government is fleecing you by breaking their own laws (do as I say, not as I do - see next post below.....).
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Feb 09 2017 12:03 pm

Ohio Town Ordered To Repay Every Speed Camera Ticket Issued

09 Feb 2017 12:05 AM PST
New Miami, Ohio broke the law, it was caught, and now it will have to repay $3,066,523 worth of tickets. That was the judgment rendered Wednesday by Butler County Court of Common Pleas Judge Michael A. Oster Jr. (Our HERO!)

"If the government has created an unconstitutional law/ordinance that has taken people's money without affording them the necessary due process protections, should not justice demand, and the law require, restitution of that money to the people?" Oster asked at the opening of his ruling. "Once the complexities of the law are analyzed, the answer is simple: Yes."

A group of three lawyers had filed suit in 2013, arguing that New Miami's automated ticketing ordinance gave vehicle owners no realistic opportunity to defend themselves against the demand for a payment of up to $180 that arrived in the mail. Optotraffic, a private vendor, sent the tickets to motorists passing through the less-than-one-square-mile town on US 127, a major highway that links Cincinnati with points north.

The state's second highest court approved the class action lawsuit against New Miami last year, and the Ohio Supreme Court chose not to intervene. Judge Oster already ruled the program violated the law, so all that remained for him to decide Wednesday was how much New Miami would pay in restitution for the village's unjust enrichment.

New Miami's lawyers insisted that sovereign immunity protected the village against such claims for monetary damages. The court disagreed, citing well-established precedent finding immunity does not apply to unconstitutional actions.

"Ohio law is clear that the reimbursement of monies collected pursuant to an unconstitutional enactment or invalid rule is equitable relief, not monetary damages, and is consequently not barred by sovereign immunity," Judge Oster concluded. "No later than thirty days after the filing of this order, plaintiff is to file with the court and affidavit evincing monies paid under the invalidated ordinance, along with an Excel spreadsheet, so that the court can set the proper amount of restitution/refund as determined under the laws of equity."

Whoo-Hooo!
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Feb 28 2017 2:14 pm

California City Doubles Down On Yellow Time Shortening

The inadvertent shortening of yellow times at intersections in Fremont, California helped the San Francisco suburb's red light cameras generate an extra $200,000 in revenue every month. Newly obtained internal city emails discussing the scandal confirm that the city's public works director intends to re-shorten the yellow times to lock in an extra $2.4 million in photo ticketing proceeds.

"It is noted that the signals are currently operating with an excessive level of yellow time, and we plan to reduce it," Public Works Director Hans F. Larsen wrote in a February 13 email to the city manager.

Larsen sent the messages in response to the KPIX television investigative report that found the intersection of Mowry Avenue and Farwell Drive and the intersection of Mowry Avenue and Blacow Road each had their yellow signal warning times increased from 4.0 to 4.7 seconds to comply with state law in 2015, only to have them slashed to 4.0 seconds in February 2016, and then put back where they belonged at 4.7 seconds in November 2016. The effect of the timing changes was easily seen in charts showing the number of $500 red light camera tickets plunging 68-77 percent when the timing was 4.7 seconds, and spiking right back to their initial levels as soon as timing was shortened to 4.0 seconds.

At first, Larsen denied the signals timing was changed at all. "I've been assured by my staff that the yellow light timing was only changed (increased to 4.7 seconds) in July 2015 and has not changed since then," Larsen wrote in a February 4 email chain.

He blamed the spikes and drops in ticketing on "seasonal variations, traffic growth, navigation apps and the 'rebound' effect." He also chastised KPIX for "misleading" the public by not mentioning these factors.

The next day (faced with sad REALITY), Larsen changed his story.

"Despite my staff's strong belief that the signal timing wasn't adjusted as the KPIX report suggests, we are looking into the possibility that a student intern (who is no longer with us) may have facilitated a timing change without key staff knowing about it," Larsen wrote on February 5. "We have a system to check signal timing at the red light camera intersections quarterly by police department and public works staff, so it seems inconceivable that a problem would have been undiscovered for the eight months that violations were high as the news story reports."

Larsen then promised to check with all the employees and contractors who had access to the signal timing cabinets. The investigation revealed that the facts reported in the media were, in fact, correct.

"Upon further review of the issue this week, we found that the yellow time had changed back to 4.0 seconds in February 2016 and then back again to 4.7 seconds in October 2016," Larsen wrote on February 13. "These work efforts were conducted by different members of public works staff, along with student interns and consultants." ("Hey Mo, Hey Mo!")

Rather than keep the current low level of red light violations in place, however, Larsen declared the 4.0 second signal timing "correct." "The period of time the signals were operating with 4.7 seconds of yellow time was above and beyond the minimum standards," Larsen wrote on February 13. (Government folk bristle at the thought of doing more than the minimum)

According to the records obtained, dropping timing back to 4 seconds will generate an additional $2.4 million in revenue, which is important factor in the budget.
Fremont's employees are among the highest paid in the nation.
Participants in the shortened yellow timing email conversation included City Manager Fred Diaz, paid $407,895 in 2015, Police Chief Richard Lucero, $404,810, and Police Lieutenant Michael Tegner, $269,702. Larsen's predecessor as public works director pocketed just under $300,000.
In total, 267 of the city's employees took home over $200,000 a year.
kurt

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hikeaz
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Re: Redflex Corruption

Post by hikeaz » Mar 05 2017 8:35 pm

Italy: Speed Camera Scandal Means Prison For CEO, Top Cop

03 Mar 2017
The United States is not alone when it comes to photo enforcement scandals. Long before federal officials began cracking down on Redflex Traffic Systems for bribing public officials, Italy's anti-crime units were raiding the offices of photo enforcement companies and covering speed cameras while the systems remained under investigation. Last week, those efforts paid off with the conviction of a key official in the town of Casorate Sempione and the owner of the speed camera firm Igea Srl.

Judge Maria Greca Zoncu of the court of Busto Arsizio sentenced Igea's Claudio Ghizzoni and police commander Caterina Buffardeci to six years in prison and a fine of 15,000 euros (US $15,840). The penalty would have been worse, but prosecutors were unable to find the exact amount of money that changed hands. Buffardeci concealed the details by speaking in code, earning her an acquittal in 2015 on forgery charges related to the speed camera program.

About 4000 fines were mailed to motorists under the dubious speed camera contract, but the amounts recipients were supposed to pay mysteriously doubled without any paperwork on file to justify the increase. The discrepancies triggered the investigation into fraud.

Ghizzoni was caught on video bribing officials in 2013 as part of a sting operation called "Hot Velox" -- named after the Italian word for speed camera: autovelox. Another figure in the scandal, Spotorno police commander Andrea Saroldi, has already been sentenced to two years and ten months behind bars for collecting kickbacks from Ghizzoni.

In 2012, the top cop in Pistoia was arrested for rigging the bid for a photo ticketing contract. In 2011, there were four raids that saw two police officers arrested on charges of soliciting bribes from people falsely accused of speeding. Seven were arrested in Frosinone for rigging speed camera contracts. The Guardia di Finanza announced five indictments in Brescia.
A judge ruled that a group of 15 mayors, cops, speed camera company employees should stand trial on fraud charges. In August 2009, speed cameras were shrouded in black plastic as up to 200 officials faced charges in Caserta.
kurt

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