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Campaign Trail #256 - 19 members in 79 triplogs have rated this an average 2.8 ( 1 to 5 best )
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Aug 31 2016
joebartels
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 Guides 245
 Routes 837
 Photos 12,313
 Triplogs 4,964

51 male
 Joined Nov 20 1996
 Phoenix, AZ
Reavis Gap, Fireline & Campaign Creek LoopGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 31 2016
joebartels
Hiking17.82 Miles 3,732 AEG
Hiking17.82 Miles   6 Hrs   29 Mns   2.95 mph
3,732 ft AEG      26 Mns Break14 LBS Pack
 
Partners partners
JuanJaimeiii
We missed the Gap turn and did the loop clockwise. Perhaps my first. I'd rather go down Campaign as it's a bit less against the grain on vegetation. Not much catclaw. Further up flimsy manzanita hangs over the trail often and takes it's toll on hikers in shorts.

The perspective change up to Fireline was a nice change. I mentioned the climb up Fireline to jj but it didn't seem to register. Believe it became crystal clear before we topped out...lol It was pretty hot but the rest of the loop was cake.

Tall but not super tall yellow wildflowers partially fill the fields. I swore in 2009 they were taller than @azdesertfather
A photo appears more waist level like this and perhaps most years.

The apples... Reavis Gold! As in eat the golden and skip the red. It's not a bumper crop year. Plenty now. Falling quick. Might be plenty for the tree climbers in a month, who knows? I brought home a pear to see if it ripens. Saw several trees loaded with what looked like choke cherries. Not sure how I missed 'em before, there are several loaded trees. JJ tried one, squinted, spit and said bitter. I respectfully disagree, 100% battery acid!

Bruce, jj and I hit this in 2012 one day later on September 1st. I was hoping for those exotic wildflowers. Apparently this year didn't measure up in rainfall.

The reverse Gap is tame compared to ccw.

Great hike as always, it would have been too hot for most.

Carried 4 quarts. Down to frozen block finishing up Fireline. Carried the block to melt it faster. Consumed 3.5, 4 easy in this heat if it wasn't frozen.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Moderate
standard yellow fields for late August

dry Pine Creek at Reavis Gap #117 Dry Dry
dry here, Carslon mentions possible pools not far in the canyon

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Reavis Creek at Fireline #118 Light flow Light flow
good light flow typical this time of year

dry Reavis Creek at Gap Trail #117 Dry Dry
ground looked damp, no pools
_____________________
- joe
Aug 31 2016
JuanJaimeiii
avatar

 Routes 571
 Photos 8,283
 Triplogs 1,824

54 male
 Joined Jan 30 2011
 Chandler, AZ
Reavis Gap, Fireline & Campaign Creek LoopGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 31 2016
JuanJaimeiii
Hiking17.82 Miles 3,732 AEG
Hiking17.82 Miles   6 Hrs   29 Mns   2.95 mph
3,732 ft AEG      26 Mns Break
 
Partners partners
joebartels
Interesting new twist on this loop. This time we went clockwise. Not intentional, just a chatting error that worked out fine. The push up the Fireline trail had me huffing and puffing. Whew I must be out of shape! :sweat:

Reavis Ranch was a welcome site as always. I was prepared to see many more apples on the trees but several have fallen already. If you want to partake in apple eating this year I suggest you get a move on. Maybe two more weeks before they all hit the ground.

The rest of the trip was uneventful for the most part. We saw several deer here and there but that is about it.

Just an enjoyable hike as always.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Moderate
_____________________
Apr 15 2016
mj3
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 Routes 1
 Photos 20
 Triplogs 1

62 male
 Joined Apr 16 2016
 PHOENIX
CirclestoneGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 15 2016
mj3
Hiking14.20 Miles 2,800 AEG
Hiking14.20 Miles   9 Hrs   20 Mns   1.65 mph
2,800 ft AEG      45 Mns Break15 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Well, after getting help from hikearizona.com for several past hikes, I finally decided to sign up. I was searching for a description for a day hike to Circlestone, but was unable to find one, so I took information from several sources and took off on my own this past tax day, Friday, April 15th. The nearest trailhead that I could determine was the Campaign Trailhead. Todd's Hiking Guide had the best description of how to get to the trailhead (http://www.toddshiking...).
The Campaign Trail #256 heads south/southwest and follows the Campaign Creek drainage, gradually increasing in elevation. The route finding is typical of route finding in desert washes - look for cairns, look for trails across the stream bed, make mistakes, go off trail, rediscover the trail, etc. Scenery was great along the way and the views kept getting better as elevation increased. I heard several large animals in the brush, but never got a peak at one. There was lots of bear scat on the trail, so I imagine it was best I didn't encounter any of those large animals I heard. The Campaign Trail eventually intersects with the Fireline Trail at between 4 and 5 miles (my phone app showed 4.93 miles, but I think it was not quite that far). There is a beautiful camp spot here for those that would like to make this an easier overnight trip. The Fireline Trail #118 (there's a sign at the junction) heads west/northwest and climbs steeply (over 1000 feet in about 1.5 miles to the Circlestone cutoff). There is a large cairn and a well worn path headed south and uphill to Circlestone at this point (I think the unofficial name of the trail is the Allen Blackman Trail). This trail climbs another 600 feet or so in about a mile. Unlike many rock piles in Arizona, you know immediately when you've arrived here. Large rock walls 5-6 feet high along with other knocked down piles, arranged in a large (around 100+ feet) circle. I guess folks are still figuring out what this Circlestone site was used for; ancient native american weather station?, alien landing spot?, livestock corral? There are several online articles about it. Whatever the reason, the location is spectacular - incredible vistas in all directions. I'll try to post some photos once I figure out how....The hike back was nice as I was more able to enjoy the views without the lung busting climb up. I didn't see a single person on the trail until I got back near the trailhead where a couple of young women were starting out on a short backpacking trip. Overall it's a pretty tough, but doable dayhike for those in good shape and with some experience in route finding. Somewhere between 14-15 miles with around 3,000 feet elevation gain - half of it gradually and half of it in a 1.5-2 mile stretch approaching the ruin. I drove to the trailhead via Globe and SR188 and came back via the Apache Trail. Got some nice shots of Canyon Lake as the sun was setting - Much more enjoyable driving the Apache Trail after a hike like that than fighting traffic on US60 from Globe.

Mike
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial
Lots of wildflowers blooming; sage, cactus, iris, and several others whose names escape me...
_____________________
Jan 23 2016
Oregon_Hiker
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 Guides 9
 Routes 392
 Photos 6,998
 Triplogs 520

75 male
 Joined Dec 07 2010
 Phoenix, AZ
Campaign Trail #256Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 23 2016
Oregon_Hiker
Hiking5.00 Miles 1,415 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   4 Hrs   30 Mns   1.11 mph
1,415 ft AEG10 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
friendofThundergod
This was my first hike in the Campaign Trail area. Lee had found what looked like a possible Indian ruin site on Google Earth not far off of the Campaign Trail and we decided to check it out. After proceeding up canyon for some distance from the trailhead we went off trail up the side of the canyon towards the location of the ruin. Just before the ruin perimeter wall came into sight, Lee found a large pottery sherd. This was a good sign that the pile of rocks seen on GE was actually an Indian Ruin and not an old ranch corral. Then we crested the hill and there was a long straight rock wall about 3 ft high. Crossing the wall we found an assembled collection of broken metates and pot sherds placed there by previous ruin hunters. Exploring the ruin we found that it was a compound style ruin with a perimeter wall layed out in an almost perfect rectangle measuring about 80 ft by 100 ft. The interior of the compound was split roughly in half by a straight interior wall running east to west. The north half of the compound had several walls dividing the space into a number of fairly large rooms. The front half appeared to have had two courtyards separated by a wall. Most of the walls were about 2 to 3 feet high with one segment still standing about 4-5 ft high.

We then started checking out some other likely looking nearby locations on small benches jutting out from the hillside. This search revealed six other ruin sites all within 0.3 miles of our first find. Three of these were smaller sites of maybe 3 to 4 rooms with walls crumbled down to no higher than 1 foot but the other three were compound style ruins with the perimeter walls surrounding an area containing rooms. These 3 were smaller than the first compound. Compound #2 had a rectangular layout about 38 ft by 45 ft, compound #3 was also rectangular about 31 ft by 40 ft, and compound #4 had a triangular shape about 95 ft on two sides and 40 ft on the third side.

Poking around all these rock piles used up a lot of our available time but Lee volunteered to show me some ruin sites he had found on previous hiking trips. About a third of the way up a long climb to one of the ruin sites we realized that we would not have time at my slow pace to get to the site. So we bailed out back down to the Campaign Trail and headed for home. Thank you, Lee, for sharing this remarkable ruin find with me.
_____________________
Jan 16 2016
John9L
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 Guides 6
 Routes 174
 Photos 5,294
 Triplogs 1,639

male
 Joined Mar 12 2004
 Scottsdale, AZ
Eastern Supes Tule to Campaign, AZ 
Eastern Supes Tule to Campaign, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Jan 16 2016
John9L
Backpack29.68 Miles 5,875 AEG
Backpack29.68 Miles3 Days         
5,875 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Claire and I had Monday off for MLK Day and wanted to get out for a three day trip into the Superstitions. We wanted to see a new area and turned our attention to Tule and Campaign trailheads. We decided to start from Tule and make a loop by incorporating over six road miles between the two trailheads.

We drove to Tule Trailhead on Saturday morning and made good time. The dirt road is in great condition and is suitable to most vehicles. We started our hike and made steady progress up Tule trail. We passed a couple of hunters and continued on as the trail starts gaining elevation. The views north of the Sierra Ancha and Four Peaks were wonderful. We eventually connected onto Two Bar Ridge and followed the AZT south. This is a really nice stretch of trail. We dropped into a valley and made a steep climb up a north facing slope that had a good blanket of snow. Once up top we completed the last mile and selected a campsite in Pine Creek. I camped here last year with FOTG and absolutely love this site! It has a flowing creek and lots of tree cover and fire ring. We settled in for the night with a nice fire and the temps were chilly but pleasant overall.

Our Sunday started slowly. We both slept in and made a fire and enjoyed breakfast. It was approaching 11am when a day hiker walked up and talked to us. He started from Campaign TH and said he talked to our friends we were meeting. Our plan was to meet FOTG at the junction of Campaign & Fireline. We got ourselves moving as we headed for Reavis Ranch. The Reavis Gap trail was very wet and muddy. Our pace was slow. We eventually reached Reavis Ranch and found the area completely deserted. We expected some backpackers but there were none. We spent a few minutes filtering water and eating lunch and then headed for the Fireline trail.

The first mile of Fireline Trail was easy going. The trail was a little muddy but not an issue. We started encountering snow in the higher elevations. There was one set of foot prints coming the opposite direction and they broke a path through the snow that helped. We eventually hit the turnoff for Circlestone. Our original plan was to hike up there but it was late in the day and our feet were soaked from the snow. We decided to continue on to camp. The next half mile was slow going through more snow. It drifted to twelves inches high in some places. We finally hit the east end of Fireline where the trail drops down to Campaign. We were delighted to see no snow! We cruised down to camp and arrived there around 4pm.

We finally hit the camp at Fireline and Campaign and could see dog prints all over the place. We were bummed to see we missed Lee and the dogs. I was hoping he was backpacking with us but knew he might be day hiking. A few minutes later we noticed the “FOTG” spelled out with some sticks. That confirmed he was day hiking. At that point we started prepping camp. We gathered firewood and got the tent set up. We planned on using the existing fire ring but it had an inch of ice on top. It was a no go so we built a temporary fire ring just off to the side. We dismantled this the next morning. We settled in for another night and enjoyed our fire. The temps were much colder tonight making things a bit uncomfortable. The fire helped if you sat close but sleeping was a challenge.

We woke earlier on Monday and had a small fire and tore down camp. We started hiking around 9:30am and headed north on the Campaign Trail. I remember this section being fairly overgrown with a hard to navigate section in the middle. We made good time till that point and then got off trail and were swallowed by manzanita and other heavy shrubs. I knew we were close to the trail but we couldn’t find it. I decided to drop us into the creek and take our chances there. The going was very difficult and both of us were frustrated. After much effort in the creek we climbed out and found the trail. From there the rest of the Campaign trail was in excellent condition. We made fast time and took a short break at the junction with the Reavis Gap trail. From there it was on to the Campaign Trailhead and then we had over six mile of road back to the Tule Trailhead. These road miles flew by as we hiked at over three miles per hour. We were back to the jeep around 2:30pm. From there it was back to Phoenix.

This was a great loop and we covered a lot of ground. There was a ton of water and lots of snow at the higher elevations. Water will not be an issue for several months. We only saw two people within the wilderness. Great hike and I was glad to see some new areas.
Culture
Culture
Camp-fire Campsite
_____________________
1 archive
Jan 16 2016
clairebear
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 Photos 178
 Triplogs 158

39 female
 Joined Oct 26 2011
 Tempe, AZ
Eastern Supes Tule to Campaign, AZ 
Eastern Supes Tule to Campaign, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Jan 16 2016
clairebear
Backpack29.68 Miles 5,875 AEG
Backpack29.68 Miles3 Days         
5,875 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
DAY 1
Saturday morning departure from the Tule Trailhead. I remember one or two other cars there at the trailhead and as we were hiking up the trail no too far from the cars we discovered quickly the cars belonged to some hunters. We said Hi and quickly moved along on our hike. Once we hiked up the the ridge were we connected with Two Bar Ridge trail we paused for a break and I adored the views- Gorgeous and rewarding. Views of the Four Peaks in one direction and then great views of Canyon Lake and Bronco Butte and Goat Mountain from an angle I'd not seen them before- Not really a shocker though since this was a new area for me. This is a beautiful section of the Eastern Supes. We followed the Two Bar Ridge Trail which dropped us eventually in a valley with an immediate and intimidating climb thanks to heavy backpack! The hike up eventually put us on a snow covered trail - ( the first of many on this trip! :D) From the top the trail leveled out and afforded us more beautiful views of snow covered Four Peaks. Eventually we reached Pine Creek and chose a great campsite with a nice resting rock near the fire for back support. Cold first night and the water in Pine Creek made filtering water extra chilly.

DAY 2
Late morning start after chatting with a guy who had met up with Lee at Campaign Trailhead. We headed up a muddy Reavis Gap trail. It was only muddy in the beginning and dried up as we gained elevation. Nice views at the highpoint and then we dipped down into Reavis Ranch. More mud here at Reavis Ranch. 9L and I both pointed out places we'd camped and then we took a lunch on a nice sitting log overlooking the creek. We had Reavis Ranch all to ourselves- a fact that took us both by surprise.

From Reavis we took the Fireline trail. This is a new trail for me and I really enjoyed the scenery on this portion of the trip. The higher elevations were covered in snowy paths lined by dense pine forests giving the illusion that I was extremely far from the desert. Even though there was so much snow it such a joy to have an unexpected blanket of powder that i've not seen before on a backbacking trip. Even though it was lovely it was still quite a workout and extremely slow going plowing through the powder and therefore we skipped out on Circlestone- a place I'm interested in yet have never visited. At this point we were both looking forward to camp and the reward of a nice fire.
We were wondering when the snow covered earth would finally give way to dirt again and as we headed down near the junction with Campaign trail and our camp. What a relief!
And I adored this camp site- great location again next to running water and a pretty wide open ground covered in soft pine needles surrounded by tall pine trees. I would love to come back here again to camp! We were however, disappointed to learn that we had missed Lee and dogs. So we commenced with camp chores and enjoyed a fire and another cold night.

DAY 3
Typical breaking down camp with added difficulty of cold factor. (When temps are quite cold I want only to hibernate!) I had a hard time warming up in the morning which made packing up difficult for me. Once we started moving as we hiked out I quickly felt better. Campaign trail is another beautiful eastern supes trail, but required a bit of route finding as we crossed over the creek many times and pushed through some dense brush. We did managed to get quite a bit off trail because we stayed low when we should have went higher. So we pushed through more uncomfortable and overgrown sections as we dropped again into a creek. This part narrowed off a bit and I was worried it would turn into a slot canyon so we both decided to climb out and this put us back on the trail. Such a relief!
The rest of this trail was easy going and uneventful. We took another break at the Reavis Gap junction and followed the trail out which took us parallel to the Reavis Mountain school eventually putting us back on the road. For the next six miles we followed the road back to the Jeep. This was the conclusion of another nice back packing trip. I will say this trip covered a lot of ground and ever changing diverse new horizons- hot desert trails,to snowy pine forests and overgrown creek beds. The snow was the most unexpected and made this trip truly memorable :) I want to revisit all of these trails again in the future^^
_____________________
Nov 19 2015
big_load
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 Routes 23
 Photos 1,254
 Triplogs 122

62 male
 Joined Oct 28 2003
 Andover, NJ
Superstition High Country Loop, AZ 
Superstition High Country Loop, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Nov 19 2015
big_load
Backpack33.00 Miles 6,700 AEG
Backpack33.00 Miles4 Days         
6,700 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
The forecast before I left NJ on Friday was partly cloudy. I should have checked again Saturday, although it wouldn't have mattered. I was going. This triplog will be long enough to use for reference so I can save my breath a few times. :D

Day 1 - West Pinto & Campaign to Fireline junction
It was overcast when I got to Miles TH. So what? Within half a mile, I had to deploy rain gear. Even so, I enjoyed the cool temps on the long climb to the divide and removed my jacket when the rain briefly abated. Just as I began pondering how far the top was, a full-fledged downpour let loose. Mildly disheartened, I re-jacketed and resumed trudging. My boots gained a pound each. They'll dry out tonight, right? I finally did top out, and began the descent into Campaign Creek with renewed vigor. Fireline shouldn't be far off, but the miles weren't clicking by fast enough and the two days of water I was carrying were taking their toll. I saw a fire ring and flat spot to the left, and decided I'd gone far enough. I dropped my pack to scout the area and discovered the corner of the campsite was the trail intersection. Things were looking up.

Night 1
The rain paused after I got the tent up, allowing a normal, though slightly rushed dinner routine. The rain's return signaled bedtime. The major downpour resumed a few hours later, and I started worrying about how low and close to the creek the site was. I put on wet rain gear and boots to check. Stream flow was still all subsurface.
Then the fireworks started and I spent half an hour counting seconds between lightning and thunder. For a while I wasn't getting all the way to one, but the heavy action eventually moved downwind.

Tent stakes started popping out as the ground liquified. Wet clothes back on, I reset and buried them under big rocks and went back to sleep. I woke to the feeling of water on my face. A vast puddle was just starting to top my bathtub floor. I erupted from tent to puddle and cleared drainage obstacles, mainly the sitting logs, clumps of pine needles, and debris that had washed down the hill and across the trail. A sheet of water half an inch deep was flowing across the whole area. I scuffed a couple shallow channels in the sand with my heel, which drained enough to keep the tent dry. The creek flow was still all subsurface. The rain grew more intermittent. Back to sleep.

Day 2 - Fireline, Circlestone, Reavis
It was raining when the alarm rang, so I went back to sleep until it stopped around 8:30. The lull was long enough to make breakfast and pack up. It started raining again before I was done, but it wasn't wet. Fine graupel continued nearly the whole rest of the day. I was ecstatic that it was neither rain nor snow, and marched up Fireline in high spirits.

Partway up, I spied at long range what appeared to be a rock wall. Maybe it was a ruin, or maybe just trail embankment. I couldn't relocate it when I got closer. I topped out before too long, and headed down the Pine Creek basin. The sun peeked through a few times, but clouds ganged up on it. When the slope turned up uphill again, I started looking for the turn to Circlestone.

I dropped my pack at the junction and practically levitated up the trail. Circlestone was bigger than I imagined, even knowing the dimensions. Despite not being very intact, it's worth seeing. I don't know of many comparable structures, and they're mostly much farther north and east. It seems in keeping with the contention that the Salado migrated during a regional depopulation of the Four Corners area. I snapped a few bad pix and wandered about for as long as I dared. Precipitation intensified, and a new round of thunder suggested a hasty retreat.

Fortunately, no lightning was evident, and I soon recovered my pack and continued down the Fireline to Reavis. Along the way were a couple pockets of quicksand at stream crossings (pretty weird at this elevation, I thought). There were a few hundred yards of very soft, ankle-deep mud on the flat, I think near Whiskey Spring. I feared it would be like that the whole rest of the way, but firmer ground returned. Eventually the Fireline ended and I turned north to Reavis. I didn't figure on having the place to myself, but it was utterly deserted (not to mention totally mushy). I plopped my tent on high ground near the foundation.

While I was unpacking, the graupel turned to a light, soft, wet snow shower. A young couple passed through, on there way to Angel Basin, and asked the time. It was 4:15, and I didn't think to ask if they planned to get all the way in one shot, but I said they could probably hit the campsites at Reavis Saddle by dark. They gave me a ripe persimmon. (Thanks!)

The snow turned heavier. An inch fell in the next 45 minutes, and my willingness to cook dinner vanished entirely. I finished off the day's trail mix, ate a tortilla and a peanut butter packet, ate a Clif Bar, and then ate the persimmon while I walked down the to the Reavis Gap junction to see what was new since my last visit.

Volunteers must have been busy, because I haven't seen the area so clean in years. The snow tapered off and soon melted. I finished wandering and watched the sky until well after dark, cheering for every little glimpse of moon or stars. My boots and socks were still thoroughly saturated, but otherwise life was good. Time for bed.

Night 2
There never was such a quiet night at the ranch. With so much water running everywhere, the critters didn't have to converge as usual. I slept much more soundly than usual.

Day 3- Reavis to Rogers Trough TH
I had decided to only go as far as Rogers Trough, so I passed on the blue and gray light and slept until there was yellow light. Yellow light? That meant the overcast blew away, which meant the temperature plummeted. My saturated boots were now blocks of ice, and the tent stakes were frozen solid into the ground. I pulled on my wet socks and jammed my feet halfway into the boots, hoping they would melt enough to get all the way on. Moments after I left the tent, the condensation froze solid.

I ate a big breakfast and filtered water from where the dead horse was. (I'm glad it's not still there). The sun warmed everything and got my feet the rest of the way into my boots. I packed up and headed for Rogers Trough at warp speed.

I followed the young couple's tracks to guess how far they went the night before. They made it past the upper sites, past Fireline, past the big juniper, past the trailside sites approaching the saddle. I stopped for a break at the saddle, and couldn't tell whether they camped there or kept going.

On the big downhill, a couple backpackers passed me heading up. They had shifted their trip to avoid the weather, so their feet were dry. They were also the last people I saw on the trip. It was getting a tad warm, but I was down before too long. The Reavis grave seemed less brushy than on my last visit.

I was running out of gas by the second break, which I took lying down in the middle of the trail. The rest of the way was longer and tougher than I expected. I didn't know there was so much up-and-down on the benches between the creek crossings. The true AEG must be quite a bit more than what's in the book. I was paying the price for last night's minimal dinner. I finally topped out and started crossing an endless meadow, wondering why the TH wasn't there yet. Then I saw the sun glinting off a distant sign, and stepped up the pace with the goal within reach.

In retrospect, I should have stopped at the campsite with the big cairn. The Rogers TH was not a happy place. It was trashy and lacked legitimate campsites. Turning back into the Wilderness, I found a little stealth spot someone had cut into a thicket not far down the trail. Home!

Night 3
Utterly uneventful. Nice!

Day 4- West Pinto back to Miles TH
I rose before dawn to get a good shot at finishing in one day. Boots were frozen solid again, but didn't take as long to thaw. My socks were almost dry. Breakfast was good and everything packed up quick. Besides the distance, I wondered about route-finding, because the stretch of West Pinto that I saw winding through the meadow yesterday looked lightly-traveled and indistinct. Still, it was a nice, cool, sunny morning and life was good.

Putting my fears to rest, the trail was easy to follow once I got out of the grass, except for missing the turn just before Rogers Spring. After reorienting, I quickly finished the two big climbs with a good bit of morning still remaining. I should have mentioned by now that every drainage everywhere has been running heavily since the morning of Day 2.

According to the book, it's downhill the rest of the way. At first that sounds like a good thing, but the downhill is pretty steep in places, and it just keeps going. I was glad to reach the Silver Spur junction, where I figured on some moderation. There were a lot of crossings in the next couple miles of the "normally dry" West Pinto Creek. It was running a few inches to a few feet throughout, but every crossing was rock-hoppable and the trail was entirely on benches and not in the creek bed (Thanks!).

Where the creek starts dropping, the trail doesn't. I'm sure it beats scrambling through the pour-offs and cataracts, but contouring deep into half a dozen main side drainages adds a lot of distance, not to mention up-and-down. The south-facing stretches had plenty of catclaw. However, the trail is smooth and hard, not rocky or wet, and the view is spectacular the whole way. I pushed along, my boots finally dried, but 30 miles of hiking in wet socks has taken a toll on my feet, and 2000 feet of downhill hadn't helped.

The long trek high above the north side of the creek finally ended, and became a similar trek high above the south side, with a little more up and down. By now, my toes welcomed the uphills. Just when I wondered if I would really finish today, I found myself at Oak Flat.

I dropped my pack and hobbled around a bit, exploring the corral as I hadn't on the way in. I finished my snacks and drank the last of my Gatorade. I could definitely see the barn. I'd been making almost 3 mph for the last couple miles, and did well over that for the remaining two and half miles to the car. I'd forgotten how many stream crossings there are in that stretch, but the bed was oddly dry except for a few puddles. I suspect that all the water pumping downstream for the mine leaves the water table extremely low in this stretch.

In about 40 minutes, I saw my car sitting alone at the corral. I skirted the giant puddle, dropped my pack, and started the long, slow, drive on FR287A back to the highway. It was long and memorable trip, but the car seat sure was comfortable.

Epilog
If you've read this far, you must be a relative, friend, hiking partner, or perhaps just the kind of person who would enjoy such a trip as much as I did. As much as I enjoyed the it, I think I'll need some time before I tackle these trails again. I had thought about taking an extra day to revisit the Rogers Canyon ruins, but decided to pass. It would have been great to see Reavis Falls with so much water flowing, but I figured it would be miserable camping down there in the cold and damp and too long to do as a day trip from the ranch. I guess I'm still saving that one for the next time.

Finally, Route Scout reports about 500 feet more for AEG on West Pinto than what's in the book, and I didn't even fire it up until I was at Rogers Spring, which makes the difference more like 700 feet. With the rollercoasters on contour between Silver Spur and Oak Flat, I think that's probably a realistic number.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
Some sycamores are still in color
_____________________
3 archives
Jul 18 2015
JuanJaimeiii
avatar

 Routes 571
 Photos 8,283
 Triplogs 1,824

54 male
 Joined Jan 30 2011
 Chandler, AZ
Reavis Gap, Fireline & Campaign Creek LoopGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 18 2015
JuanJaimeiii
Hiking16.95 Miles 3,611 AEG
Hiking16.95 Miles   6 Hrs   1 Min   2.86 mph
3,611 ft AEG      6 Mns Break
 
Another trip out to do the Reavis Loop from the Campaign Trail head with Joe. Weather was Perfect with just the right combo of overcast, a light breeze and a hint of sunshine from time to time.

Along the way we encountered many chirping birds, a couple white tail deer and one black rattlesnake. The apples this year are minimal at best. I would say we saw less than a hundred apples in total on the various trees.

Maybe this would be a good year to assemble a team to go out and prune the trees? They definitely need it.

After the hike it was a stop in Globe for some tasty Mexican food and then a short ride home.
_____________________
Jul 18 2015
joebartels
avatar

 Guides 245
 Routes 837
 Photos 12,313
 Triplogs 4,964

51 male
 Joined Nov 20 1996
 Phoenix, AZ
Reavis Gap, Fireline & Campaign Creek LoopGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 18 2015
joebartels
Hiking16.95 Miles 3,611 AEG
Hiking16.95 Miles   6 Hrs   1 Min   2.86 mph
3,611 ft AEG      6 Mns Break
 
80% chance of heavy thunderstorms never panned out. A little disappointing, summer deluge in the Superstitions is typically remarkable. The Gap Trail still rolls sweet like a '79 Continental.

The apple blossoms must have suffered frost damage in spring. We only spotted 6 apples in maybe the first 20-30 trees on the north. Found a couple trees loaded but infested with worms. Might be a good year to get a crew in to prune the orchard. No bear sightings, just a black rattler in the tall grass.

Love any Reavis hike, anytime of the year it isn't freezing!

We hit J & R's Fine Mexican Food and Steaks on Ash in Globe. Atmosphere is similar to a tidy garage sale. My food was very good. Really liked the salsa, so most probably would not. The hot salsa has a little sneak back kick for the taco rock stars.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
Mainly the standard purple flowers seen around the ranch. I think they are Purple Nightshade.
_____________________
- joe
Feb 21 2015
friendofThundergod
avatar

 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,094
 Triplogs 866

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Reavis via Miles TH, AZ 
Reavis via Miles TH, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Feb 21 2015
friendofThundergod
Backpack30.49 Miles 6,623 AEG
Backpack30.49 Miles
6,623 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
John mentioned the Eastern Supes as a possible over night destination and me being a little partial to that area immediately suggested a nice little lasso loop out of Miles TH to Reavis Ranch and back. I chose a route that I thought would provide a nice intro to the Eastern Supes for John and cover some of the nicest country out there in my opinion.

The route and trip did not disappoint. There is still water everywhere, we were the beneficiaries of a very thorough trail maintenance project on the lower half of Campaign Creek and ended up with a superb campsite at the junction of a strong flowing Pine Creek and Reavis Gap.

Our hike out Sunday seemed to go by pretty quick we were at the TH by 1:30 and covered the final 14 miles in just under six hours.

Turned out to be a real nice over night trek. John seemed satisfied with his first real trip to the Eastern Supes and I was happy to finally get somebody out there with me. It was nice to get on the trails with 9L again and I appreciate his stern discipline in keeping Cup and Blanco in line for most of the weekend. When John is pulling up the six its all business for Cup and Blanco no stopping and sniffing, no stopping period and no distractions ;)

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Brushy Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Water near spring area and water with modest flow in Campaign Creek for long stretches near spring area

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Pine Creek at Reavis Gap #117 Medium flow Medium flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Walnut Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Box about 3/4 full as usual.
_____________________
2 archives
Feb 21 2015
John9L
avatar

 Guides 6
 Routes 174
 Photos 5,294
 Triplogs 1,639

male
 Joined Mar 12 2004
 Scottsdale, AZ
Reavis via Miles TH, AZ 
Reavis via Miles TH, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Feb 21 2015
John9L
Backpack30.49 Miles 6,623 AEG
Backpack30.49 Miles2 Days         
6,623 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Met up with Lee for a fun overnighter in the Supes! We left Phoenix around 6am and made our way to the Miles Trailhead. The plan was to make a 28+ mile lasso loop utilizing several trails including the Campaign, Reavis Gap & Fireline Trails. This hike would tie in a large chunk of trails I haven’t been on previously.

We started hiking a little before 8am and made our way west. After two miles we turned north on the Campaign Trail and made the climb to the divide. From there we dropped down to Campaign Creek and fought our way through relatively heavy overgrowth. It wasn’t too bad and we kept a fairly good pace. We passed the Fireline Trail and continued north. We hit the trail work roughly two miles north of Fireline. From there we made quick progress to the Reavis Gap Trail. This trail is in good condition and we made the climb to the Two Bar Ridge Trail where we detoured over to have a look at Walnut Spring. It’s a mid-size trough with reliable water. Our original plan was to camp in this area but we decided to push it one more mile to Pine Creek which had two excellent camp sites and the creek was flowing cool and clear.

We settled in at Pine Creek as we got camp set up and gathered firewood. We did our camp chores and then enjoyed a fire. I didn’t realize Manzanita burns so well. We left a surplus of wood for the next campers. We both turned in a little after 9pm. The next morning I could hear FOTG breaking down camp and he wanted to get moving. I was a little slow in the morning as I broke down camp and packed up. We hit the trail a little before 7:30am.

On day two we continued west on the Reavis Gap trail and dropped down to Reavis Ranch. We could hear people on the north side of the ranch but we never saw them. We headed south and took a short break before heading back east on the Fireline Trail. We made steady progress and eventually hit the Campaign Trail. From there we retraced our steps and were back to the vehicle around 1:30pm.

We covered a lot of ground on this hike and I was pleasantly surprised with the eastern Supes. The trails can be overgrown but are good overall. The views are stunning as well and we only saw six people on this entire hike. I definitely want to get back out there before summer hits. Thanks FOTG for coming up with our route and driving!
_____________________
Jan 24 2015
friendofThundergod
avatar

 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,094
 Triplogs 866

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Pinto Peak 5991Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 24 2015
friendofThundergod
Hiking28.14 Miles 6,460 AEG
Hiking28.14 Miles   13 Hrs   24 Mns   2.27 mph
6,460 ft AEG   1 Hour    Break
 
I am starting to feel like I am running out of spots to explore in the Supes, so I have decided to look up, as in peaks and summits. I crossed an obscure Eastern Supes peak off my list today, although Pinto Peak is a pretty distinguishable terrain feature of the Eastern Supes and hardly obscure, maybe seldom visited is a better way to describe. Similarly, at just under 6000 feet I believe it would come in as the third highest mountain in the Superstition Wilderness area behind White and Mound Mountain.

The off trail portion up Pinto Peak bordered on diabolical and pleasant. The most natural route follows an old fence line pretty much the entire way, one cannot divert much from this fence line either, or you will end up in some of the thickest brush you have ever encountered. It took Blanco and I over an hour to go the seven tenths of a mile needed to reach the summit of Pinto Peak. I finally learned to hug the fence line and make use of the small path next to the fence and to not be lured by false trails leading away from it. My hard work was rewarded with an Indian ruin site located on the saddle below Pinto and a mystery wall or remnants of a fortress on Pinto's summit. The final push up the peak was actually the nicest portion of the off-trail route as there was minimal brush, some nice paths through the rock out croppings and some pretty established game trails. However, the majority of the route was slow going with several fence crossings and slithering through areas made nearly impassable by some our favorite off trail mainstays manzinita, acacia and holy oak.

I had aspirations of also knocking out Mound Mountain, but the slow trip up Pinto and a late start made that look like less of a possibility by the time noon hit. However, not to be deterred I still chose to take Campaign north and Fireline into Reavis just to see where I would be at in time and energy. I honestly felt pretty good, but it was already 2 and although I had already committed to a head lamp finish, I wanted to limit it to West Pinto, as it is a pretty easy trail to follow at night.

Pretty standard hiking the rest of way, I ran into a group of four with one guy who was hurting pretty bad, they had hiked in from Pickett Post and had committed to hiking out Lake Roosevelt on Sunday. They were only about a mile or so in from Roger's TH and looking for a place to camp, with one guy looking for a ride to Surprise, he said there was no way he thought he could finish this hike, I just really could not help though as my car was at Miles and not Rogers Trough. He offered money, but I just could not think of a way I could help him, there was no way he was hiking out to Miles with me in his condition. He had two more parties behind me to ask, so maybe he got lucky.

I ran into a HAZ guy named Dave near Roger's Trough. He had just completed a Spencer Spring, West Pinto Loop. He had recognized the white dog, we chatted for a minute and continued my race with the setting sun. I broke down at 18:41 and finally put on my head lamp we arrived at Miles TH just after nine.
Culture
Culture
Benchmark Memorial
Named place
Named place
Pinto Peak Reavis Valley
_____________________
6 archives
Jan 18 2015
friendofThundergod
avatar

 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,094
 Triplogs 866

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Campaign TH to First Water TH, AZ 
Campaign TH to First Water TH, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Jan 18 2015
friendofThundergod
Backpack42.08 Miles 6,927 AEG
Backpack42.08 Miles2 Days         
6,927 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Due to coaching obligations, I was not able to maximize my MLK day weekend this year and had to settle for a Sunday to Monday over-night somewhere. I chose the Supes a place that I don't have a lot of
familiarity with ;

I chose your pretty standard Campaign TH to First Water TH over-nighter for the pups and myself. I was able to enlist the help of Chumley to set up my shuttle who surprisingly was very cool with the idea of waking up at 430 in the morning to drop me off at Campaign TH. I told Chumley that I thought I could make it across the supes in 32-34 miles, 35 tops. I think I may have missed a trail or two in my estimation :-k A very uncharacteristic mileage estimation by myself, very uncharacteristic, Kyle, and Chumley will attest to my usually very accurate trail estimation numbers.

Day One: 20.6 miles

Campaign Trail: Campaign Trail is always pleasant to me. I met a very large group of CCC employees out of Flag and they are in process of a multi day trail clearing project of Campaign Trail, might be a good time to hit trail, if you have never been.

Reavis Gap The trail is in great shape! Trail seems to be seeing some decent traffic this winter. Water everywhere, water on trail, water in secondary washes, water flowing at intersection with Pine Creek.

Reavis Ranch Trail (S): Ranch was dead, signs of over-night campers but everyone gone. Hike south was great, one of my favorite sections of trail in Supes. Water flowing nearly the entire way to saddle. I met a guy who said the reason he was hiking his dog out here was because of Blanco and Cup, I guess they have some fans, not to stroke their egos.

Roger's Canyon: Standard Roger's Canyon conditions, a little busy around the ruins. Water conditions very disappointing, the antithesis of the conditions I encountered earlier in day and far below other winters for comparison. However, on bright side Roger's Canyon Trail seemed to have been the recipient of some recent trail work and the climb to Tortilla Divide was pretty much brush free.

JF Ranch Trail: Camped near wilderness boundary at last available spot with water. Initially I planned to camp near this really pictureseque spot just before Dripping Springs, but I could tell Cup was beat. I figured I could make up those lost miles with an earlier start and I could also get Cup some extra rest for day two.

Day Two: 21.6 miles

Cup woke up relatively spry I packed up camp quickly devoured some oatmeal and coffee and hit the trail just before six.

Woodbury Head-lamped it not much to report.

Coffee Flats: I ran into two guys camping at Dripping Springs who immediately greeted Cup and Blanco by name, yup more fans :roll: Both guys were members on HAZ, but they said they don't really post much one username had a lot letters and numbers in it and I think the other one had a pirate it in it, I can't remember, but good guys, chatted for a minute and then continued mission. The cows have really done a number on this otherwise beautiful area.

Dutchman Trail I spent a lot of time on this trail on the second day and still can't think of anything nice to say, just a means to an end in the instance of this trip. Actually, did not mind the Dutchman, its just not my favorite trail in the Supes. Water conditions were great along trail, met some cool horsemen, a few hikers, and enjoyed the nice trail.

Bluff Springs Trail: short and sweet, lots of water took a dedicated break to filter and rest dogs.

Terrapin Trail: I did dread the Terrapin a little, because not the most ideal trail for making good time and it has seemed to drag on from past trips. However, it was a blur today, seems as quick as we started it we were finishing and getting back on the Dutchman again. Water levels good, but have seen better, but generally flowing up to divide on each side. Trail is over-grown in a few spots, and enough acacia to make you wish you wore pants, I know because I wore shorts.

Final Notes: An excellent way to see the Supes if you ask me, especially, if you are in a rush. It was very cool to go from the Pines to the desert to the riparian area of Fraser and essentially see all the Supes have to offer. I may have had a tremendous miscalculation in miles, however, I was correct in choosing the east to west direction of travel as my assumption that I would be losing more elevation then gaining. The profile really highlights the difference in elevations of the Eastern and Western Supes. I did choose the most dog friendly trails I could think of and Cup responded well. I was little worried about her the way she dragged herself into camp the first night, but she bounced back admirable and walked out right next to me at four o'clock on the dot today.
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3 archives
Jan 11 2015
josetoe5
avatar

 Routes 8
 Photos 163
 Triplogs 19

male
 Joined Jan 09 2011
 Phoenix, AZ
Mound Mountain PeakGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 11 2015
josetoe5
Hiking22.00 Miles 5,500 AEG
Hiking22.00 Miles   9 Hrs   40 Mns   2.87 mph
5,500 ft AEG   2 Hrs    Break
 
1st trip
This write-up is from my hiking site: https://www.facebook.com/ArizonaHiking1

Has anyone else been to the high point of the Superstition Mountains east of Phoenix? Many will say, yes I've been to Peak 5057 along the Superstition Ridgeline. Up until 3 months ago I too thought that was the high point. However, the Superstitions extend east beyond Superior, AZ. The actual high point is Mound Mountain, a very remote, tucked away peak that sits at 6266 feet. With the Superstition Mountains being my favorite mountain range, it was a top priority to bag this peak and check another high point off the list.

Nothing about this hike turned out to be easy, and that included the planning. There are several trailheads that can be used to access Mound Mountain. The most common seems to be from the Campaign Trailhead, which sits to the north. Also, the Rogers Trough trailhead is a popular option as that provides about nice loop opportunity to also visit Reavis Ranch. We ended up using the Miles Trailhead, as based on research the road to get there didn't require a 4WD vehicle, only a high clearance vehicle. My buddy Brett had actually scouted this trailhead a month ago, making sure it was accessible and also checking out the first 4 miles of the hike.

With it being winter, we wanted to be hiking before first light. Even with the scouting trip, the ~14 miles of off road travel to get to the trailhead proved difficult to navigate. With several mines in the area we ran into a mine foreman who helped us with navigation. We ended up reaching the Miles TH about 30 minutes later than planned, but still started the hiked at 7am using headlamps. The Miles TH has an abandoned ranch next to it that would be cool to check out if we had time.

The first ~3 miles used the West Pinto Trail, which follows Pinto creek, had a decent amount of water in it from recent rains/snow. This section of trail had been maintained within the last few years, and was easy to follow. When the sun rose, I was struck by how different this section of the superstitions is. It isn't as rugged, with all of the jagged formations and yellow/green rocks. This area had a lot of different mountains, but being higher the mountains were forested, and many had distinctive peaks. Very beautiful, but don't come to this area expecting more of the same!

Within an hour, we reached the junction with the Campaign Trail. This is where the climbing began. For the next ~2 miles, we followed the Campaign trail north along the ridges of various hills. The first few miles were easy to follow. After passing through a gate, we descended down into a small canyon, then climbed back out of it. This section became less of an open trail and more of a trail that required some bush-whacking through thick manzanita. There are a few sections that are hard to follow, and on the way back we got lost for 40 minutes (more details later in the write-up). After reaching a saddle, we descended steeply down to campaign creek, which we followed for a few miles. This section as well wasn't easy to follow and required a lot of bush-whacking. Brett & I discussed how due to the frequent bush-whacking this hike is a lot harder, as in several sections you can't really maintain a consistent pace.

This was also the section where we started encountering patches of snow, with a lot of animal footprints in them, some of them very large. Check out a few of the pictures on this post. I think that one print was that of a bear, and the other a mountain lion. What was disconcerting is the bear prints followed the same path we were taking for a number of miles, with fresh scat along the trail. I may have to consider carrying bear spray in such remote areas that don't see people frequently!

Finally, we reached a junction with the Fireline trail, which heads sharply west, and climbing steeply while doing so. After ~2 miles there is a large cairn that marks the unofficial trail to Circlestone Ruins and finally Mound Mountain. The use trail climbs south for about .5 miles to reach a large, circular pile of rocks, Circlestone Ruins. These are Native American ruins that could be as old as 100 B.C. For more info on CircleStone check out this site: https://sites.google.com/site/boglekevi ... onmountain. From Circlestone, you now get a view of Mound Mountain, which is only another ~.5 miles to reach the summit. Navigation for this last .5 miles was difficult. The trail didn't seem to be well defined, but we knew where the summit was as Brett had created an accurate GPS track to follow. After some more bushwhacking along the western side of the peak the snow became thick for the last 100 feet of climbing. On the ascent we chose a dicey route that involved a steep climb through brush. After finally reaching the ridge, we hiked the last 1,000 feet on the eastern side of the mountain to reach the peak. From the peak the 360 degree views are amazing. Four Peaks, the Superstition Ridgeline and several other prominent peaks are in view. It took us 4 hours and 45 minutes to reach the peak with minimal breaks. An hour was easily lost due to route-finding difficulties and bushwhacking.

Unfortunately, the descent took us just as long due to getting lost on the Campaign Trail. If you look at my GPS track is is very tempting to descend straight down Mound to connect to Campaign, shaving 3 miles of the trek. However this route looked very sketchy and we smartly decided to stay on maintained trails as much as possible. Around 2:30pm, while descending manzanita maze portion of the Campaign trail, the clouds became thicker, and a light rain developed. The views to the west looked ominous, and heavy rain appeared likely. We were concerned mainly due to the fact that the road to the trailhead was steep with several washes, and in heavy rain we could be stuck. While descending through the thick manzanita section, the trail seemed to vanish suddenly, and my GPS stopped working due to the heavy cloud cover. We were left in a manzanita maze where there appeared to be use trails everywhere. After some of the worst bush-whacking I've ever done in a few directions, we could see the trail in the distance about a quarter miles away, and were able to discern the direction to head. From here the challenge was to regain the trail, as we did not want to attempt any more bush-whacking. Luckily my GPS recovered and we re-connected with the trail. There seemed to be 3 or 4 other spots on the return trip where we had minor route-finding difficulties. Also, the rain never fell beyond a sprinkle and wasn't a problem.

9 hours and 40 minutes after starting, we finished the 22 mile, 5500 ft accumulated gain hike. We were battered and bruised, but were happy to have knocked Mound Mountain off the list. I don't think I will do this same track again for awhile, but definitely will be back to check our Reavis Ranch and Reavis Falls, using trails to the west.

Notes/Opinions:
-We saw 0 people the entire day. That should underscore how remote and little used sections of this area are.
-Getting to the trailhead alone is difficult -- come prepared!
-If possible, bring a machete (seriously). The bushwhacking was unbelievable in many areas.
-Don't go alone. Even being experienced, I would never do this hike without at least one other experienced hiker.
-Bring a concise GPS track. Without it, we would have never found our way.
-It is ambitious to attempt this hike in the winter with the short amount of daylight. We maintain a very fast pace when we hike. From what I've seen, most require 12 hours to complete this or do this as an overnight trip. If we wouldn't have had route-finding difficult & gotten lost, we would have completed this trek in under 8 hours.
-I didn't take many pictures throughout the day as we hardly stopped unless necessary, to ensure we reached the peak! This would be an amazing area
to take your time and enjoy the beauty.
-No matter what approach you take, you will be looking at a minimum 18 mile roundtrip hike to reach Mound Mountain.
Culture
Culture
Benchmark
Named place
Named place
Pinto Peak
_____________________
Dec 06 2014
friendofThundergod
avatar

 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,094
 Triplogs 866

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Wildcat Canyon - Tonto NFGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 06 2014
friendofThundergod
Hiking18.76 Miles 4,185 AEG
Hiking18.76 Miles   9 Hrs   9 Mns   2.17 mph
4,185 ft AEG      30 Mns Break
 
1st trip
I was just trying to be creative with an Eastern Supes loop and this was what I came up with. I went in Miles TH then took the Wildcat Canyon route to Cuff Button, some road walking then reentering the Supes via the decommissioned Pinto Peak Trail to Campaign Trail over the divide back down to W. Pinto Trail and the TH.

I finally completed the Wildcat Canyon route to Cuff Button a hike that can be found in the Eastern edition of the Carlson and Stewart guide and a hike that was recently completed by hikerdw. In fact, he shared his route with me, something I was missing on my first attempt. I did get to the W. Gate the first time, but was unsure of route from there. This time it was pretty straight forward and once you hit Wildcat Canyon the trail becomes a highway by Eastern Supes standards, it might be better than many of the "maintained" trails in that area. The trail through Wildcat Canyon appears to get a lot of hunter traffic or ranching traffic, either way someone has kept the trail pretty clear and it has a heavy tread in most spots. It was probably the highlight of the day too bad it was only a little over three of my miles for the day.

I took the decommissioned Pinto Peak Trail past Mormon Corral and the now pretty much defunct Mountain Spring which seems to have fallen victim to someone's poor repair or improvement project. The person who had a camera trap there for six months last year is most likely responsible I assume. Regardless, the once relatively robust and reliable spring is now barely dripping.

I kept a pretty leisurely pace most of the day and limited my poking around for rock piles. Cup came along on this one and did not want to beat her up as bad as I did on my Tule loop, but she did just fine, no issues with the longer distance or rougher trails. We did not take many breaks due to the fact that we never really saw the sun until it set, if that makes sense. Tons of bear scat and other indicators to hint that they are really active in the wooded pine sections of upper Campaign. Saw a large pack of coati in Wildcat Canyon and several deer, no shortage of water out there, but a little less then I anticipated. I am going to clean up route through Wildcat Canyon and post to public, definitely worth the trip, nice little canyon.
Culture
Culture
Cairn
Named place
Named place
Mountain Spring
Meteorology
Meteorology
Sunset

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Brushy Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Water all along area marked as Brushy Spring on map and GPS, flowing and several pool areas.

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Mountain Spring Dripping Dripping
A slow drip, small metal trough is full below pipe.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Musk Hog Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Water in rubber lined tank and wash.
_____________________
4 archives
Sep 27 2014
Tough_Boots
avatar

 Routes 67
 Photos 2,708
 Triplogs 755

64 male
 Joined Mar 28 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Reavis Ranch via Miles TH, AZ 
Reavis Ranch via Miles TH, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Sep 27 2014
Tough_Boots
Hiking23.00 Miles 5,340 AEG
Hiking23.00 Miles
5,340 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Third dayhike to Reavis Ranch in a month's time and all from different trailheads :D

Met up early with BiFrost and slowandsteady to meet Lee out at the Miles TH. I had canceled my overnight because of the weather coming in but wasn't afraid to dayhike in it. It was nice to hit some sections of trail I'd never done before, too.

The weather was great for the hike in. There's a few real big climbs to conquer but eventually you get the apples at the ranch. We took our break and filtered some water for the hike out. Leaving Lee and the dogs behind, we headed out and the rain came pretty quickly as we headed back up the Fireline. After sprinkling just a bit for a while, it grew harder and harder and then the thunder and lightning got closer and closer.

Wearing glasses in a thundershower is the worst. I made my way through the overgrown trails but my visibility was terrible. I kept hoping the storm would pass by the time we topped out on the Pinto Divide. I wasn't looking forward to being so exposed up there. Luckily, it calmed down just as we were starting that climb.

The storm settled and we got a nice lightning show in the distance. It sprinkled again once or twice but no big deal and we had to wade through a couple creeks that hadn't been running that morning. We eventually made it back to the trailhead after a couple miles with our headlamps on. It was one heck of a hike.

I broke one of my rules, though. I never hike trails for the first time in shorts. I paid the price and my legs are absolutely shredded from this one.
Culture
Culture
HAZ - Selfie
_____________________
2 archives
Sep 27 2014
BiFrost
avatar

 Guides 4
 Routes 372
 Photos 8,261
 Triplogs 1,002

51 male
 Joined Nov 20 2012
 Phoenix, AZ
Reavis Ranch via Miles TH, AZ 
Reavis Ranch via Miles TH, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Sep 27 2014
BiFrost
Hiking23.07 Miles 5,126 AEG
Hiking23.07 Miles   12 Hrs   47 Mns   2.12 mph
5,126 ft AEG   1 Hour   54 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Partners partners
friendofThundergod
slowandsteady
Tough_Boots
We met Lee at Miles Ranch TH Saturday morning for day hike to Reavis but Lee's plan was to overnight at Reavis. We (Lee, Kyle, Kathy, Blanco and Cup) headed up the trail in overcast and very humid conditions expecting rain with the forecast. The West Pinto Trail #212 is good but then it meets the junction with Campaign Trail #256 that we took up the hill. As we made our way up to the West Pinto Divide the sun came out and weather was looking up. Then down to the Fireline Trail #118 junction and followed this up past the Circlestone turn off to Reavis Ranch.

Finally got the see the apples with still plenty on the trees. Very green with all the rain so we spent over an hour eating lunch and walking through the orchard. Too bad we couldn't spend longer but had to get back to the vehicle. We said goodbye to Lee and headed out for the long hike back.

Shortly after leaving Reavis Ranch area the rain started to kick in. Light showers at first but then several heavy down pours ensued. Rain was heaviest for about an hour in Campaign Creek heading up to the divide. Wet and a bit tired we finally made the downhill section as it was getting dark with 4 miles to go. Campaign trail was difficult to follow in the dark but everyone happy to be back at the vehicle.
Named place
Named place
Sawtooth Ridge
_____________________
2 archives
Sep 21 2014
Dave1
avatar

 Routes 29
 Photos 1,548
 Triplogs 1,802

45 male
 Joined Jan 25 2009
 Phoenix, AZ
Reavis Gap Trail #117Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 21 2014
Dave1
Hiking15.50 Miles 3,200 AEG
Hiking15.50 Miles
3,200 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
Started from Campaign Trailhead. The drive in was easy up to Reevis Mountain School (the first one), then the road goes through a few sandy washes, a few small creek crossings, and then up and down some rutted hills. You may be able to make it in 2wd but I used my 4wd.

Lots of wildflowers out for 2nd Spring. Plenty of green and red apples at the ranch. This may be the peak right now.

Wildlife spotted:
1 white tailed deer
1 javelina
1 rattlesnake
1 tarantula hawk
1 tarantula hawk's dinner

I little bit too warm for me on the hike in but we got some nice cloud cover about half-way.
_____________________
Aug 09 2014
Tough_Boots
avatar

 Routes 67
 Photos 2,708
 Triplogs 755

64 male
 Joined Mar 28 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Pine Creek Lower Reavis Creek Ranch Loop, AZ 
Pine Creek Lower Reavis Creek Ranch Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Aug 09 2014
Tough_Boots
Hiking25.00 Miles 5,702 AEG
Hiking25.00 Miles
5,702 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
For some reason, I thought it would be fun to get totally beaten down by a hike and Lee had a pretty good one put together. I think he was trying to kill me-- probably jealous of my physique and rugged good looks.

We started the morning moving pretty good. We were dodging bullets flying up from Reavis Mountain School so that put a spring in our step. The first couple climbs were made pretty effortlessly and soon we were down the Two Bar Ridge Trail.

After the spring, we began our off-trail section of the hike. We headed down towards the creek and Lee showed me a couple ruins. Even though now just a pile of rocks, one had been pretty substantial with multiple rooms. We also connected to the old road survey which Lee had some background on.

We finally made it down to Pine Creek. The bushwacking wasn't too bad getting there and there were only isolated pools of water so the going was fairly easy for a while. As it got later in the morning, the heat really began to hit. I was getting baked down in that creek bed. This part really dragged on and I kept feeling as though I was on one of MtnBart's hikes :)

For the most this was a really pretty part of the hike-- just the wrong time of year to do it in. We finally hit Reavis Creek and then it seemed like another eternity until we hit the Reavis Falls trail. I was happy to see it when we finally reached it. We went up the creek a bit farther until we found water, filled up, and took a break in the shade. I stretched that break as long as I could. I knew I was going to have trouble climbing back out to 109.

As we started upwards I told myself I would just have to power through it. Quickly I realized I had no power :o . This was going to be a long trudge. I was discouraged since the last time I came out of the falls trail, I didn't have to stop a single time before hitting 109. Now I was dragging myself from patch of shade to patch of shade. I was beginning to worry about making it back to the trailhead since we weren't even halfway done with our hike at that point. I finally started seeing 109 in the distance and it looked like the climb was coming to an end. I felt better about things and knew with the elevation and dropping sun that I would soon recover.

I was feeling better pretty quickly after we hit 109-- not great, but better. We had nice breezes and shade. Eventually we hit the Ranch which is always nice to be at. We filled up again on water, had some snacks, and headed on our way. The last two big climbs didn't seem too bad but the length of this day was wearing on me. My feet and muscles were sore. It was now dark and I was well ready to be done. This last section went on forever. We finally hit the school and were home free.

This was a great hike and I'll never do it again :D

Thanks for the ass kicking, Lee. Bag on me all you want-- we both know who was too destroyed by this hike to drive us home :sl:
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Aug 06 2014
JuanJaimeiii
avatar

 Routes 571
 Photos 8,283
 Triplogs 1,824

54 male
 Joined Jan 30 2011
 Chandler, AZ
Reavis Gap, Fireline & Campaign Creek LoopGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 06 2014
JuanJaimeiii
Hiking17.01 Miles 3,595 AEG
Hiking17.01 Miles   5 Hrs   46 Mns   2.99 mph
3,595 ft AEG      5 Mns Break
 
Joe picked a winner as he was on a quest to find out this years status of the Reavis Apple supply. Of course I was intrigued as well.

His recent report of things being dry in the area had us a bit concerned. We were afraid that it wasn't going to be a good year in the apple department. Well I am happy to report we were wrong. The apples are coming, the apples are coming! They need a good couple more weeks to be ready to go but they are there and they are plentiful.

I ate three today just to be sure they were safe. So far so good! :D

On the way home we stopped in Globe and had some good Mexican food at El Ranchito. Chalo's was closed for remodel. It worked out just fine. The place was an ice box inside.

Good times!
Flora
Flora
Apple
Fauna
Fauna
White Tailed Deer
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average hiking speed 2.44 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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