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582 triplogs
Nov 01 2009
DarthStiller
avatar

 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
East Mountain Trail #214Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 01 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking18.20 Miles 2,537 AEG
Hiking18.20 Miles   7 Hrs   50 Mns   2.32 mph
2,537 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Partners partners
HAZ - Event
JimmyLyding
johnr1
This turned out to be a very nice hike, even if a bit longer than I figured. We started out on the Toll Road Trail, which starts in a wash off of FR138 and quickly leaves. A downed sign is in the wash indicated to follow the trail out. At about a mile in, there was a fork in the trail. The cairns indicated to go left, but the right one looked like more of a trail, but it climbed very quickly along a ridge. We got a few hundred yards in and I noticed on my GPS that we were veering farther and farther off the trail. I decided to that we should go back before we got too far along. We made our way back down and followed the lower trail, following the bottom of the canyon, gradually regaining that elevation. Once we got up again, we noticed a trail junction coming in from the right again. Maybe this is the trail that follows the ridge, maybe not. :-k

Once we got up into the tree cover, we spotted 2 deer running up the other side of the canyon wall. A little after the junction for the first trail spur that takes you to FR112, we descended into a wash and lost the trail temporarily. After making our way a few hundred yards up the center of a very narrow section of the wash, it finally widened out a bit and I was able to make my way out to relocate the trail. A little further on we found some kind of shelter made out of logs.

The switchback section of the East Mt. Trail is a bit off from where my GPS mapping shows it, but it was fairly easy to follow. Some sections this area require some route finding due to the damage caused by the recent fire, but it's really not too bad. In fact, it appears that the fire for the most part cleared out some brush that would have otherwise made the hike a little rougher. As the trail ascended the ridge, the views to the east were great. We spotted some bear tracks and several deer tracks up there, also.

After a not-so-quick lunch, we descended down to FR112, taking it down to its junction with Sixshooter, then to the Check Dam, Toll Road, and back to the car. There is also some more route finding required at the windmill on the Check Dam Trail. At this point heading east, go thru the gate and then immediately look right for the faint trail. It picks up as you move along. If you go straight on the road and get to the dam, you've gone too far. The junction of the Check Dam and Toll Road Trails is also somewhat vague and not necessarily in agreement with what the marker sign says the Toll Road Trail is. Having my GPS track of where we were hours earlier helped in locating the Toll Road.

We were surprised to see as much green as we did on the trees, but there was some color. The weather was pretty much perfect, not too hot and very clear, making for excellent pictures. I'm going with johnr1's mileage, since we had 3 GPS's with 4 different mileage readings. 18.2 miles certainly feels like what we did.
Culture
Culture
johnr1
_____________________
Oct 04 2009
DarthStiller
avatar

 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Fountain Hills Preserve, AZ 
Fountain Hills Preserve, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Oct 04 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking11.10 Miles
Hiking11.10 Miles   5 Hrs   25 Mns   2.05 mph
 
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
This area is just recently accesible thanks to the connecting Sonoran Trail that was recently completed. The following trails are in the Fountain Hills Preserve:
Sonoran Trail
Western Loop Trail
Promenade Trail
Town Overlook Trail
Easy Access Trail

A map of this area is available at http://www.scfh.org/trails.html.

Start at the Dixie Mine Trail. The parking is at the end of the public section of Golden Eagle Boulevard. You have to walk about a half mile through the Eagles Nest development. Very few houses are here now due to the recent economic downturn. There are about as many half built houses as completed ones. The actual trailhead is at the end of a cul-de-sac. Take the Dixie Mine Trail to the Sonoran Trail and follow it into the preserve.

The Sonoran Trail is very wide up to the border of the preserve. Then it narrows. At about the 2 mile mark, the trail tops a ridge, at which point there seem to be 3 options: straight, left, or right. Go straight. This is the Promenade Trail and it actually is what appears to be an old mining road. No signs are present here but there are some rock designs (smiley face, peace sign). After a few hundred feet, there is a very small temporary marker showing the junction with the Western Loop Trail, which rapidly climbs the mountain. The Western Loop Trail loops back to the Promenade Trail farther south, and just north of the preserve's border. I remained on the Promenade Trail and took it to the southern border of the preserve. There is a sign at the border telling you to stop, but no gates exist and you can take the chance to follow the old road if you want. I turned back and walked the Town Overlook and Easy Access Trails before taking the Western Loop Trail on my way back north.

The clouds made for some very interesting scenery. The McDowells were very shaded, except for some small areas of sunlight that would move across as the wind blew. At the top of the Western Loop Trail, you can see over the McDowell Mts and into Phoenix and the west side. Saw some deer tracks along the Promenade Trail, but no deer. Saw a tarantula early on in the day and at the last 50 feet of the Dixie Mine Trail I encountered a diamondback lying on the trail. I walked around him off the trail before he decided to slither the rest of the way across the trail.
Fauna
Fauna
Tarantula
_____________________
Sep 26 2009
DarthStiller
avatar

 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Middle Trail #202Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 26 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking1.70 Miles 174 AEG
Hiking1.70 Miles   1 Hour   30 Mns   1.13 mph
174 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Did this hike with my sister and my two kids. We parked at one of the upper campgrounds and took the Pineline Trail #193 south to the junction with the Middle Trail #202 and headed east until we got to the dirt road and took that back to the where we parked. The total mileage for the loop was 1.7 miles. Even though the trail was pretty easy, there was a section with a lot of downed trees, which made it a little hard for the kids. Even after that, it was pretty slow going until we got back to the road. Just before the junction with the Middle Trail we saw some cattle grazing. They had left quite a few "landmines" along the trail, which made for another obstacle to steer the kids around. After we finished, we had lunch at the campground and headed back down to the heat of the desert.
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Aug 16 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Indian Springs Trail #627Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 16 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking7.50 Miles 300 AEG
Hiking7.50 Miles   3 Hrs   5 Mns   2.43 mph
300 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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wallyfrack
We started this one just before 6:30am which made for a chilly first few miles. The sun didn't hit us until about a mile or so in. Nice hike thru the forest for the most part. This was one of the most serene and peaceful hikes I've done in recent memory. It was very nice to take in the scenery from the meadows with the morning light. We had originally considered including the West Fork Black River trail with this hike, but due to the marathon hike the day before, the amount of chores we both had to do at home, and plain old common sense, we decided otherwise. Oh well, something to save for later.

On the way to this hike, we spotted a herd of about 50 elk. It looked really magnificent crossing the tundra and the road in the morning. Naturally, my camera was in the back of the vehicle and there was no berm on the road to pull over.
_____________________
Aug 15 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Mount Baldy LoopAlpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 15 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking17.50 Miles 2,000 AEG
Hiking17.50 Miles   7 Hrs   20 Mns   2.39 mph
2,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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wallyfrack
This was another one where the final mileage was in question. We started from the West fork trail to do the loop, which adds at least an extra 2 miles. My GPS odometer (which is notoriously unreliable) said 18.0 miles, and after I saved the track, it said 18.6 miles. It certainly felt like every bit of 18.6, but based on most of the other info available to us, I'm going to split the difference on this one and say 17.5.

This hike has one of the strangest starts when a guy with a group of horseriders approached us and asked us about current conditions of the trail. He said that the Forest service had been lying saying they had cleared the upper part of the trail,but his recent experiences there horse riding last year proved otherwise. he then recommeneded that we take firearms if we had any (which we didn't) because there was a recent experience with a local who had a wolf almost attack him. This guy went so far as to suggest we kill any wolf with sticks, knives, rocks, etc if we encountered one. Because of this, Wally decided to pick up a walking stick and use it for the first half of this hike.

I must be getting old now because I can tell when the elevation is affecting me. Every semi-steep climb on this trail seemed much harder. As we approached the top, I stopped more and more often to take pictures and rest.

For the record, where the West and East Fork trails meet is NOT the boundary of the reservation. When we were there, there were two sign posts from which the signs were removed. My 100 classic hike books says that where the trail crosses this boundary is another half mile uphill. From the junction to the boundary, the trail parallels the boundary. My GPS seemed to confirm this. I figured this all out only after we were done. We decided to turn back down at the junction of the East and West Forks so as not to risk anything. When we were there, one guy was watching the packs of a group of his friends who he said had decided to summit sans packs. This guy also claimed that the boundary was at this junction. He was kind of right because it is right there, but the trail doesn't cross it for another half mile. One day I may return to make it to the boundary.

The connector trail #96 is much narrower than 94 and 95 and seemed more like 3 miles than 2. Even the slightest gains in elevation at this point were a total chore due to elevation and fatigue since we were on our 15th and 16th miles. The lighting at the end of the day was phenomenal. I look forward to returning here next summer.

On the way back, we spotted a small herd of elk along FR113 before the Sunrise ski resort.
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Aug 09 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Bog - Kent Springs LoopTucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 09 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking6.40 Miles 1,600 AEG
Hiking6.40 Miles   3 Hrs   20 Mns   1.92 mph
1,600 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
HAZ - Event
I started this one myself very early at 6:35am. For the majority of the hike, I was completely in the shade and shadow of the mountain since the sun didn't over the mountain until almost 9am. This made for less of an opportunity to have good lighting for photos, but I was enjoying the cool weather. It felt like it was about 60 when I started, and there were plenty of breezes. I took the Kent Spring Trail up, which I thought was easier since it's essentially a service road. It becomes very steep in places, especially just before the end when you reach Kent Spring. There is a nice stream that runs alongside it for most of the way up.

I took the Bog Springs Trail on the way back down. By then the sun had started to hit the trail, but there was still plenty of shade provided by the trees, with a few views here and there of the mountains in the clearings. This trail is easy to follow, but very narrow in sections and also rocky. At the end of the hike, I took a spur trail up to the Amphitheatre TH and walked the road back to my starting point at the Madera TH.
Culture
Culture
Spring Box
_____________________
Aug 08 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Old Baldy - Super Trail LoopTucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 08 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking14.60 Miles 4,210 AEG
Hiking14.60 Miles   7 Hrs   35 Mns   1.93 mph
4,210 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Partners partners
HAZ - Event
Groth
I did this hike with Tim, Jade Eir's friend, and now new HAZ member. The mileage for this seems to be a point of contention. For some reason, my GPS seems to add mileage on the odometer as I walk. The final mileage the odometer gave was 15.8 miles. While it certainly felt like we did that when we were done, the official mileage listed on the map is 13.5. Although, the last segment of the Super Trail from the TH to Josephine Saddle is listed on the map as 3.7 miles, but the sign at Josephine Saddle says it's 4 miles, which would then add 0.3 miles to the total. To further add to the confusion, once I save a track on the GPS, it suddenly gives me a different mileage. In this case, it told me our total mileage that day was 14.6 miles. We did take a wrong turn at Josephine Saddle and had to double back, which we estimated at 0.6 miles extra hiking. Therefore, I'm going with the 14.6 as our official mileage.

We took the Old Baldy Trail up the peak of Mt. Wrightson, which is the quickest way up, and the Super Trail down, making a true figure-8 loop. We decided that it would be best to get the uphill part out of the way ASAP, and enjoy the gradual descent. It also is nicer to do it this way since most of the Old Baldy Trail is shaded, and the views are sparse. After Josephine Saddle up to Baldy Saddle the trail narrows and is a tad overgrown in spots. At about the 8000' elevation mark, I started to run out of gas and hit a wall. I forgot to bring my trail mix bars to fuel me while I hiked, so we ended up stopping a Baldy Saddle for about 10 minutes or so while I ate one of my sandwiches and had and EmergenceC that Tim gave me. The final climb to the peak was better, but still a bit of a slog.

The views at the top were outstanding. I'm not very familiar with this area, so I barely knew what I was looking at, other than Tucson and Mt. Lemmon. After taking in the views and watching the squirrels fight over the peanuts Tim was tossing them, we headed back down.

The views on the Super Trail were also outstanding, and it gave us a glimpse of the other side of the mountain. Towards the end we saw a few deer running in the washes. The lower end of the Super Trail also seemed kind of rocky, but this may have also just seemed that way since we were on Mile 15 at that point.
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Aug 03 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Onyx BridgeNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 03 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking5.20 Miles 345 AEG
Hiking5.20 Miles   2 Hrs   40 Mns   1.95 mph
345 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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wallyfrack
After hiking over 32 miles and 5000' vertical the previous two days, Wally and I slept in until 6am before driving over 100 miles to the Petrified Forest to find the Onyx Bridge. This hike turned out to be a perfect topper for the extended weekend of hiking, not being too hard to do and having remarkable scenery.

The trail starts right behind the Painted Desert Inn Museum and drop a good 200' or more to the desert floor below. Once there, it's a matter of following the various washes and drainages to the Onyx Bridge, which is an ancient petrified trees that has fallen over a wash. Without having my GPS that told us exactly where the Onyx Bridge is, I can't imagine that we would have found it. The area is mostly flat and the best to get there seems to follow the various washes that will lead right up to it, if you know which general direction to go. The amount of petrified wood is amazing, and the colors and layers of sand and dirt there are amazing. We spotted another downed petrified tree very close to the Onyx Bridge (SW of it) on top of a hill that was also quite interesting.

On our way back, Wally and I split up as I started to follow my GPS track of our way out, only to decide to take a more beeline approach, while Wally drifted to the west. I ended up too far east and has to make my way over a hill, which I didn't mind at all since it gave me more scenery to photograph. After we finished, we met up rally_toad for a bit to say hi before we made our way back home. This turned out to be a very decent weekend of hiking, and the next best option to celebrate my 40th birthday while my family is still on extended vacation in Serbia.
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1 archive
Aug 02 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
North Kaibab TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 02 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking17.30 Miles 5,000 AEG
Hiking17.30 Miles   7 Hrs   50 Mns   2.21 mph
5,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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wallyfrack
This was the hike that was planned as the crown jewel of my 40th birthday weekend. We had just completed two hikes the day before at a total of 15 miles, and now we were planning to hike the North Kaibab Trail all the way down to Ribbon Falls, 8.3 miles one way, making a 16.6 trip total for the day, not to mention the near 5000' vertical that we would have to climb to get out of the canyon. And the weather forecast for this day at the bottom was 99 degrees when I last checked. This would be how I spent my last 24 hours of my 30s, and if I made it, then it was off to Flagstaff for some microbrews and a burger.

I set my alarm for 4am, and was in fact awake much earlier due to the fact that the beds in the frontier cabins on the North Rim aren't very comfortable. We got ourselves prepared and were at the trailhead just after 5am. We immediately noticed that the temperature at the TH was much colder (and much windier) than at the cabins. This required some last minute impromptu layering, and then we were on our way.

We got on the trail at daybreak, with just enough light that we wouldn't need to break out the headlamps. For the majority of the hike down (until about a mile from Ribbon Falls) we in fact hiked in the shade without any direct sunlight hitting us, which helped a lot. As the morning light hit the upper parts of the cliffs, I tried to get some decent photos. I managed to keep up with Wally for most of this part of the hike, mainly because I could jog a bit downhill at times to catch up after I had taken a few pictures and otherwise lagged behind.

Some of the best views of this hike are of the section 3-4 miles below the rim, where the cliffs are very vertical and the trail is cut into the cliff. There is some exposure here, but the trail is wide enough to mitigate that. It is very tempting to keep peering over the edge at the views below.

Once we got past Roaring Spring, the trail soon leveled out, getting us to Cottonwood Camp and Ribbon Falls with minimal sun exposure. Just before Cottonwood Camp we got our first view of the South Rim exposed to the sun, framed by the shaded portions of the canyon immediately adjacent to us.

We arrived at the junction for the turnoff to Ribbons Falls just over 3 hours after we started. We decided to venture in a little bit so Wally could see it and get some pics. I decided to take the spur trail back to the south to catch up with Kaibab Trail to make sure I did the entire trail since my hike in 2001 when I went to Ribbon Falls from Phantom Ranch. The south portion of that "trail" soon faded away and you had to find a decent spot to cross Bright Angel Creek. I found a good enough spot, except for the fact that a curled up rattler was sitting right on the shore there. I managed to find another way around, and then as I was about to get back on the Kaibab Trail, I looked behind to check on Wally, who was supposed to go back up the north way to the Kaibab. Instead, not only did he follow my path, he was now about to cross the creek in the exact same spot that I saw the rattler at. I called to him to warn him, but since he was standing next to the creek, he couldn't make out what I said. He nodded his head and proceeded straight ahead to the snake. I finally yelled out, "WALLY, RATTLESNAKE!!!" while motioning for him to move upstream from where he was. He finally seemed to get the idea and proceeded to the Kaibab Trail without incident.

The hike became a bit of a slog on the way up as the trail got steeper, the temps got hotter, and I got more tired. As we reached the North Rim again, we began to notice more of the tourist types not used to hiking making their way down, probably too far for the amount of water they had. We also ran into a volunteer who had his hands full trying to warn everyone and keep track of them. I finally finished at 1:20pm, making a hike time of 7 hours and 50 min for 17.3 miles. I calculate this mileage from the listed one way distance of 8.3 miles plus the approximate .75 miles that we did in our loop to Ribbon Falls and back to the Kaibab Trail. This felt very nice to accomplish this hike on the last day of my 30s and not feel too bad afterwards.

One the way to Flag after the hike, we spotted a herd of bison in the meadows north of the rim. We both soon after were very tired. I was nodding off for about a half hour until we stopped for a bit in Jacob Lake and got some caffeine. For the entire ride down into Flag, we could see the fires by the North Rim and just north of Flag and how the smoke plumes drifted NE across the state.
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Aug 01 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Uncle Jim TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 01 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking5.00 Miles 250 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   1 Hour   40 Mns   3.00 mph
250 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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wallyfrack
This was the first hike of four for the weekend of my 40th birthday. We got a little later start due to my oversleeping in the morning, but were still able to start at about 12:30pm. The beginning of the trail has a few spots that are overloaded with the mule manure, but then after that it's pretty clean. The beginning has a few climbs, which I didn't welcome very much only because the hike description I had read in my book described that as a mostly level hike.

Very early in the hike, while were still on the Ken Patrick trail I think, we saw a family of turkeys. Three baby turkeys flew down off the hillside right next to the trail amongst some pine trees. We could see and hear the parents calling to them, and they didn't sound very pleased. I managed to get some shots and we were on our way.

At the southernmost tip of the loop, there is a spur trail that goes to the edge where there is a very nice lookout of the North Rim. We got the obligatory photos, noticed a fire that seemed to be starting to the east, and made our way to the rest of the hike. On the way back we ran into a mule train who had a guide that was a bit of a control freak, but no major incidents occurred.
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Aug 01 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Widforss TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 01 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking10.00 Miles 650 AEG
Hiking10.00 Miles   4 Hrs      2.50 mph
650 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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wallyfrack
Since the North Rim is so far way and since I almost never get to make trips for hiking that require an overnighter since we're raising two small kids now, I try to make the most of every trip. Thus, after we finished the Uncle Jim Trail, we immediately packed our stuff into Wally's Jeep and made our way over to the Widforss Trail, which is barely 2 miles away. This hike also started with a climb at the beginning, but after that was mainly level, except for a few annoying drainages that accounted for elevation change. The first half of the trail stays close to the rim, allowing for some very nice views over towards the North Rim Village and of the Transept. The first half also has numbered posts that correspond with brochures available at the trailhead which give some narrative and interesting info.

After the first half, the trail meanders away from the rim and thru some forested area until comes out at Widforss Point, which gives some very nice views towards the south. The San Francisco Peaks in Flagstaff were visible on the horizon. We could also see a number of forest fires that were occurring to the south, and the one to the east that we saw earlier on the Uncle Jim Trail had grown substantially. The plume of smoke from that fire had become huge, and even appeared that it might be in the North Rim Village, but fortunately it wasn't.

On the way back, I saw a deer that crossed the trail in front of me that I managed to get a couple decent pictures of. After we finished, we saw a doe with two fawns on our way to the lodge. I managed to get my camera from the back of the Jeep, but it went on the fritz again as the one fawn practically posed for me for a full 2 minutes. Oh well, at least I got a picture of one deer.
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Jul 26 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
 Routes 384
 Photos 7,710
 Triplogs 582

52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Soap Creek CanyonNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Canyoneering avatar Jul 26 2009
DarthStiller
Canyoneering10.00 Miles 1,000 AEG
Canyoneering10.00 Miles   6 Hrs   50 Mns   1.46 mph
1,000 ft AEG
Basic Canyoneering - Scrambling; easy climbing/downclimbing; frequent hand use; rope recommended; easy exit
A - Dry or little water; shallow or avoidable water; no wet/dry suit
II - Normally requires a half day
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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This one turned out to be quite the adventure. I got an early start at 6am and needed every minute. This starts out very innocently going down the wash. As the canyon deepens, you have to make your way down some steep drop-offs. Nothing too bad in the way of exposure to falls. Then the wash junctions with the South Fork of Soap Creek. At this point you turn left and continue downstream. Not long after, the obstacles become much more formidable.

All thru this canyon are rockfalls, and even huge sections of the canyon walls that have eroded and collapsed across the creek bed. At just one of these sections, you have to boulder your way across the huge rocks. Not long after, look to your right for cairns that will guide your way up a huge rockslide. It was a little unnerving in some sections to make my way up and down this rockslide, seeing as some of the rocks/boulders weren't completely stable.

Once I got past the rockslide, a few hundred feet more downstream is the mega drop-off. I started out trying to make my way down this, since it was basically a series of smaller drop-offs. Finally, at the last one, I saw that it was a good 6-8 feet down, too much to risk an injury, especially hiking alone. I looked to my right again and saw one of the few sections of an actual trail for this hike, which very conveniently guides you past this mess. I made my way back up and to this trail, which gained even more elevation as it skirted the deep canyon below. The exposure on this section of trail is considerable, and the trail is very narrow, and loose in spots. Be very careful where you step and don't gawk too much at the scenery here.

The trail fades away at another rockslide that is also very well cairned. At the bottom of this rockslide, there is some more bouldering that includes a rope strung around a boulder to help you lower yourself. After this, the creek finally levels out, allowing for some more normal hiking. At one point during this last bit of bouldering, I made the mistake of allowing my feet to get into one of the mud puddles. The mud in this creek is very slippery, hence the name Soap Creek.

At the junction of the North and South Forks of Soap Creek, North Creek had a trickle of water, which was just enough to make the rest of the hike an exercise in trying to keep the mud off my boots. At some points it seemed almost inevitable, probably mainly due to how tired I was getting. By the time I reached the Colorado, I had drank my entire Camelback bladder, 3L.

At the river, I ate lunch, drank another liter of water, and filled up with 3 more liters. The forecasted temperature for Marble Canyon today was 100 degrees. Down at the Colorado, it was easily 110. Making my way back up Soap Creek was somewhat difficult in the unrelenting sun. The first milestone for me to reach was to get past the junction of the north and south forks, so I didn't have to keep dodging the mud.

Getting back up the big dropoff and rockslides turned out not to be as bad as I was afraid off. Some shade had crept in at that point, and as my elevation increased, so did the temps drop just enough. It also helped immensely that some clouds had drifted by just in time as I started to ascend.

At the rope, I discovered that it was great for lowering yourself, but not so good for pulling yourself up and out. I actually backed down and tried to find another way, only to find that any other route was impossible. I managed to make it up on the 2nd try, using a belly flop move to anchor my center of gravity on the upper level area, thereby preventing my falling. This resulted in my being covered in the fine dirt powder, which subsequently turned into mud as it made contact with my sweat soaked clothes and became worked into the fabric. My new white longsleeve summer hiking shirt is no longer white, and probably never will be again. [Update note: The rope ladder that is shown in older picture sets is gone now. There is only one rope that is badly placed. Be prepared for a challenge to get yourself out of this canyon, or else bring an extra rope to leave on your way down.]

Once I finished, I had a nice 5 hour drive back to Mesa, fighting winding roads, traffic, and monsoons.

My GPS lost the signal a few times in the narrow portions of the canyon, resulting in the GPS locating me at a wrong area and then back again, adding to the total mileage. Upon inspection of the route on my computer, I would guess that the total round trip mileage for this is about 10 miles.

As a sidenote, I went thru 9 liters of water on this hike, which I believe is a personal record for me.
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Jul 25 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
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 Photos 7,710
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52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Spencer Trail - Marble CanyonNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 25 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking6.90 Miles 1,500 AEG
Hiking6.90 Miles   4 Hrs      1.73 mph
1,500 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
HAZ - Event
I did about half of this trail 9.5 years ago when I first moved to AZ when my work sent me up there. At about the halfway point, I started having trouble finding the trail, and being at the time a very novice hiker, I didn't take any water. I always told myself that one day I was going to make it back up that area to finish the trail, and to spend some time there. Almost a decade later, I finally got around to it.

This time the trail was much easier to find, seeing as I've probably hiked about 1000 miles since then. This is definitely one of my favorite trails in AZ. The weather was hot, but since I packed enough water this time, it wasn't a problem.

As you ascend, the views of the Colorado River are amazing. The further up you go, the farther downstream you can see the crevice that is the tip of the Grand Canyon. To the west, Paria River Canyon also becomes more visible. Once I got to the top, I walked probably another ¾ of a mile checking out the scenery. I walked to the edge of the north cliff and could see the Colorado on the other side. I also got some good views to the east of Lees Ferry, upstream. I noticed some thunderclouds to the NW rolling in down Paria River Canyon, so I decided to get back down. Fortunately, the rain waited until I was back at my hotel. After getting back down, I walked the River Trail to its terminus, making my total mileage for the day 6.9 miles. Since I didn't have to hightail it back home, I spent some extra time checking out the ruins of Lees Ferry.
Culture
Culture
Stone Dwelling
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Jul 13 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
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52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Niska Banja Loop, WW 
Niska Banja Loop, WW
 
Hiking avatar Jul 13 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking15.20 Miles 1,500 AEG
Hiking15.20 Miles   6 Hrs      2.53 mph
1,500 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This hike turned out to be more of an adventure than we originally planned. It was mostly in the shade of the forest, but had a few areas here and there where you could see some good views of the city Nis, and of the surrounding mountains and Nisava River valley. I did this hike with my wife's cousin Jordan, who for the entire 15.2 miles that we ended up hiking, drank only a half liter of some kind of carbonated Schwepp's drink.

This hike started at Niska Banja, a day spa with a lot of tourist activities. From there, a marked trail makes its way up the hill to the Nis Transversal Trail, which is a 130km trail that makes its way around the Nisava River Valley along the mountain range. The Nis Transversal takes you to Trem on Suva Planina, which was the first hike I did when I got here. We took the Nis Transveral to a point where you can take another trail (if you can find it) back to Niska Banja, which by my guessitmate, looked to be a 10-12 mile loop. The only problem is that the trails for the most part follow already existing horse carriage roads that run along the hill, most of which are certainly hundreds of years old. The trail can be very well marked in some places, and horrible in others. In some ways, this was similar to hiking in the more remote areas of the Tonto National Forest.

We started out ok getting up the hill following a very well built and easy to follow footpath. Once we got to the top, the trail started to branch off. We followed a trail that was unmarked to a paraglider platform, from which we took some pictures of Nis and the surrounding area. From there we began to follow a gravel road further uphill, but began to notice that we hadn�t seen any of the red and white paint markers for a while. After some dead-ending on trails, we finally found the marked trail, which only took us right to the gravel road we had started on. At the junction with the dirt road was a sign for Crni Kamen (Black Rock), which wasn�t listed on my map. That trail took us to a dirt road, which had one obscured red and white marker. The trail kept going up. We took that trail and noticed after almost a half mile that there were no markers (they can be spaced pretty far apart). So we made our way down and went over a quarter mile on the dirt road with no sign of markers. We then made it back to the junction again and went a quarter mile in the other direction, where we found markers and the one waypoint along the Nis Transversal called KT3, which has a spring. From there, Jordan and I argued about which direction we should go. We went his way, found another unmarked junction, took that wrong road and came back to the KT3 marker, to notice the marker that said which way to go to get to KT4. We finally were on our way in the right direction on the Nis Transversal, and it had taken 2 hours total since the beginning and we had probably already hiked an extra mile and half.

Once we got going on the Nis Transversal, things were pleasant again. The hiking was mostly level and in the shade. The temperature was below 80 and not very humid at all. Once we got to Crni Kamen, we summitted there, and took the obligatory pics, which included a nice view of Suva Planina.

Once we got to the junction with the trail that takes you back to Niska Banja, things got hairy again. The markers are very obscure a the junctions with the other roads and things are very overgrown at this time of year. We went down one road that seemed wrong once we looked at the topo map so we backtracked another half mile. Then we took another road that had the markers, but they disappeared after a while. We kept taking roads and found more junctions, but no markers. We tried to just take one road downhill to almost bushwhack our way down but the road faded away, quickly. We finally made the gut-check decision to make our way all the way back the way we came. My GPS said we had done 9 miles, so this was not something I was looking forward to, even with enough water. On our way back, we began to notice the markers again, and Jordan then told me he saw some marking on one tree that said "to N. Banja". I had totally missed it due to the overgrowth. Even after seeing it, you had to bushwhack your way thru 100 feet or more of high overgrowth to get to the small road that takes you back to the start.

Even on this road, we got sidetracked on a wrong road on the way down due to the poor marking that gives the impression you should take the lower road. We figured this out a few hundred feet in, but we were already a few hundred feet lower, and were too tired to make our way back for even more backtracking. This turned to be ok since this road eventually took us back to the trail, which ends up following an asphalt road for the last mile and a half to Niska Banja. It was also very cool because we went thru a small village called Rautovo, which is very rural. The buildings are mostly made of mud and sticks, for real. We were a little confused on which way to go, so Jordan asked two old men who happened to be walking their cow, and they told us which way to go. The last thing we passed on the way out of Rautovo was the graveyard, which had the pictures of a lot of old couples who appeared to be from the early 20th and late 19th century. Overall it was a very cool experience to walk thru an old rural village like this and get an up close look.

This is my last hike in Serbia for this trip, and after this, I think I'll need a break before I tackle the Grand Canyon next month while my family has an extended stay with the relatives. I enjoyed hiking here very much and look forward to coming back in a few years to check out some more trails and hit the other peak on Suva Planina, which is called Sokolov Kamen (Falcon's Rock).
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Jul 10 2009
DarthStiller
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52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Midzor (via Babin Zub), WW 
Midzor (via Babin Zub), WW
 
Hiking avatar Jul 10 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking10.40 Miles 2,000 AEG
Hiking10.40 Miles   4 Hrs   35 Mns   2.27 mph
2,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I did this hike with my brother-in-law, Mika. Midzor (Meej-oar) is the highest point in Serbia at 2169m (my GPS said 7163'), and is right along the border with Bulgaria. The easiest way to get there is the way we took, from the Babin Zub (bobbin zoob) Hotel (located just under a huge rock called Babin Zub (Grandma's Tooth) that looks just like Weaver's Needle). The route is just under 10 miles, but with the side excursions we did to some canyon edges for pictures, my GPS said we did about 10.4 miles. For the duration of this hike, we were accompanied by two stray dogs, that followed us the entire way to the top. Once we got there, I felt bad enough for the dogs to give them some leftover snacks that I knew I wasn't going to eat.

This hike mainly follows an old horse carriage road for the duration, as it cuts across meadows on its way to the top. Take the main dirt road to the ski area, which is still under construction, and turn left past that where a much smaller, steeper and rougher jeep road that goes up a steep hill. The first mile or so is quite steep as the trail cuts across the switchbacking horse trail going north. After that, the trail just essentially follows the horse trail as it gains elevation and heads east. The views to the north and south are incredible. The ridge to the north that forms the horizon also serves as a natural border between Serbia and Bulgaria. Along the border, there are white concrete markers. It was so strange to zoom out on my GPS and see a map of Europe and not the western US that I would normally see.

About halfway along the road, there were a herd of cows grazing, which made their usual mess on the road. The stray dogs, who served as our guides if we wondered which way to go, decided to chase a few cows, and one bull, which was not amused.

Just under Midzor, there are some ruins, probably some kind of summer shelter for the herders who made their living in this area. At this ruin, look to the left (west) for a faint trail that cuts uphill across the meadow. This trail switchbacks a few times until it takes you to Midzor. On our way to the top, the peak was actually obscured by a low ceiling of clouds. We were lucky enough to have the ceiling lift before we got there. There still remained a heavy curtain of clouds along the border with Bulgaria, which would blow up from below and swirl in front us, creating some very otherworldly scenery.

On our way back, the sun came out more, giving an opportunity to take even better pictures than on our way up. We saw a small light brown snake. I managed to get a few pics before it got way as my brother-in-law blocked its way with his walking stick. Once I showed my wife the picture of it, she told me it was definitely a poisonous snake. Luckily, no injuries occurred.
Culture
Culture
Terrible Towel
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Jul 08 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
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52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Suva Planina (Trem via Bojanina Voda), WW 
Suva Planina (Trem via Bojanina Voda), WW
 
Hiking avatar Jul 08 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking10.00 Miles 3,100 AEG
Hiking10.00 Miles   5 Hrs      2.00 mph
3,100 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I attempted this hike 4 years ago, but was thwarted by a very cold downpour. For the last four years, I've been thinking about getting to the top of this mountain, which is visible from my in-laws' house. This hike is definitely comparable to Humphrey's Peak, being about 10 miles in length with an AEG of 3100'. The views can also pretty much compete with any from the San Fran Peaks.

Suva Planina (Dry Mountain) is one of the major mountain ranges in Serbia, approximately 20 miles east of Nis, the second largest city in Serbia (and where my wife is from). It has two peaks, Trem (1810 m, 5973' according to my GPS) and Sokolov Kamen (1548 m, do the math). The saddle in between the two peaks is called Devojcka Grob (Widow's Grave) and is about 4300'. This hike started at the ski resort area called Bojanine Vode and took a trail up to Devojcka Grob and then to Trem. We had originally hoped to bag both peaks today, but my wife's cousin Milan, the only one hiking with me today, wasn't up for the second peak once we reached Trem.

A sign at the bottom gave the approximate times to reach each landmark. Devojcka Grob was listed at 2 hours and Trem at 4 hours. We got to Devojcka Grob in 1 hour 15 min. and to Trem in 2.5 hours. I felt pretty good about this since (except for special exceptions) I�m almost always the slowest hiker when HAZ members are involved. Before we started, I told Milan I had 2 walking sticks and he was welcome to use one. He said we might need them in AZ, but in Serbia they don't need them. At about the halfway point from Devojcka Grob to Trem, I stopped to see how far behind Milan was, and noticed he had grabbed a wooden stick along the trail to help him on his way up. For a guy 12 years younger and 100+ lbs lighter, I gave him a little razzing about this. Then I realized, Nis' elevation is about 650-700' and we were now over the 5000' mark. Even though Milan plays soccer a lot, he does so at such a low elevation that now he was gasping for air more and more with each step. Since my hikes in AZ over the last month have started at 4500' and gone up to 7500', I had a distinct conditioning advantage, even with my recent conditioning of myself to Serbian beer and brandy.

At Devojcka Grob, we at first noticed a lot of wind, but since it was over 90F in Nis (don't forget the humidity, AZ residents), this was actually a welcome breeze. As we hoofed it up to Trem, our body temps kept high, so the wind was keeping us comfortable. Even at the peak, we were very comfortable. As we gained altitude, it was clear to see how much closer to the clouds we were getting. It's such a cool sight to see the clouds fly by you just a few hundred feet above your head. At the top, the views all around were astounding. We stopped to read the map I bought in Nis to see how there is an entire system of trails in this mountain range that not only lend themselves to dayhikes, but multi-day backpacks, as well (te-wa, this is all you). Anyone who wants to try this, contact me for info on where to stay in Nis on the cheap. My in-laws will be happy to rent out a room for a fraction of the cost of a hotel and give you a ride to and from the TH. Your transportation to and from Belgrade is on you (unless you happen to go when I do).

Once we got back down to Devojcka Grob, Milan made it clear that no way could he make it to Sokolov Kamen. No worries, from reading the map, I've already planned a loop hike from Bojanine Vode that's no more than 13 miles RT. We got back to the car with no problems and made it back home by 3:30pm (otherwise known as BEER:30), in time for a shower and dinner and enough daylight to see how different the mountain looks now from my in-laws' upper terrace.

Since this is an international hike, I went a little overboard on the pictures.
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4 archives
Jun 28 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
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 Photos 7,710
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52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
McDowell Sonoran Preserve, AZ 
McDowell Sonoran Preserve, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jun 28 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking10.60 Miles 900 AEG
Hiking10.60 Miles   4 Hrs   10 Mns   2.54 mph
900 ft AEG
 no routes
Partners partners
rdavisiii
I hiked from the 104th St. and Bell Road TH along the Levee Trail to the Gateway Loop, part of the Windgate Trail to the Desert Park Trail and back to Gateway Loop again. On my way up on the first part the Gateway Loop, about 1.6 miles in, I stopped to take a picture and heard someone calling my name. Someone was making it up the trail. It was rdavisiii, doing his imitation of Wally from 3 weeks ago catching up along the trail. He lives very close by and decided to tag along at the last second. Fortunately no wild dogs were encountered this time (although on the drive in I did see a coyote crossing Bell Road right by the TH with a dead wascally wabbit for breakfast). It ended up being a pleasant surprise to have some company on this hike to shoot the breeze with, telling hiking stories and talking about planned future hikes.

On the way back along the Gateway Loop, we stopped at the Gateway of Thompson Peak Parkway at Ron's suggestion. There's a very cool 3D diorama of the moutains with the trails mapped out on them. We finished up around 10:30am, just as the temps were starting to climb.

The next hike will be my latest one from Serbia.
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Jun 21 2009
DarthStiller
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52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Bobtail Ridge Trail #194Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 21 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking9.20 Miles 2,000 AEG
Hiking9.20 Miles   4 Hrs   30 Mns   2.04 mph
2,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Partners partners
joebartels
sarichter
wallyfrack
The night before this hike, I was still pondering whether or not to wear shorts or long pants. It is June now in AZ, but I've hiked the trails in the upper region of this area before and when I thought about the nettles, I decided on long pants. Turns out it was a very good decision.

The Bobtail Trail #194, for all intents and purposes, does not exist after the 0.75 mile mark. Any attempt to go further will only end badly. But don't take my word for it, put on some shorts and have a nice time. Better yet, just ask Joe and Stefan:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTYfE16oyqI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHS98oKJdTI

Somehow, I don't remember that much laughter when I think about it now.

We thought we might have ended up on the decommissioned Millcreek Trail #199, but that was only wishful thinking. we spent a little more time trying to find Trail #194, but finally ended up going back sooner than expected.

I was the first to arrive back at the car, which I knew wasn't right, since I am normally the slowest hiker. After waiting 15 minutes, I decided to hike over to the Squaw Spring Trail #196. I wrote a note on my dusty car telling Wally, Joe and Stefan where I was going, assuming they hadn't been killed by a mountain lion. I assumed at this point that they had probably found the trail and made their way down to FR221, because if it there was a mountain lion, I would have heard (a little) more screaming. On my way back up Tr. #196, I figured something may have gone really wrong because I still hadn't run into them. On the way back to the car, I decided to take a detour along the Middle Trail #202 to the last section of the Sixshooter Trail I hadnt yet completed and then to the Pineline Trail back to the car. It was there I found the remaining group napping under some pines. I had arrived from an area no one had expected, and was considering yelling to scare everyone, but couldn't think of the perfect line before everyone woke up. Oh well.

On the way back home, we almost got taken out by a tandem axle white pickup on FR55 doing about 55 mph. His back end fishtailed and for a bit looked like it was on a collision course with my front end. My quick maneuvering avoided a full on collision. However, on the way back, my low tire pressure light came on. Upon closer inspection while trying to add air later on, I discovered that during our close call, my wheel got scraped and some small rocks are now embedded just under the front passenger side tire. WTF!
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Jun 14 2009
DarthStiller
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 Guides 26
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52 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
San Tan Mountain Regional ParkPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 14 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking13.20 Miles 800 AEG
Hiking13.20 Miles   4 Hrs   50 Mns   2.73 mph
800 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Made another trip to this county park to hike some of the new trails that have been built since I last visited almost a year and a half ago. The Malpais Trail gets very close to the mountain at the southwest corner of the park, but most of it goes thru a sandy wash, which isn't very pleasant to slog thru. A biplane was overhead for a small portion of the hike doing loop-de-loops and making a lot of noise. At the southwest corner of the park, Picacho Peak is visible. The temps were mild, only beginning to get a little warm at the end. Didn't see any animals along the trail, but there were about 3 baby coyotes within a cyclone fence enclosure back by the TH.
Flora
Flora
Saguaro
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Jun 07 2009
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 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Kellner Canyon Trail #242Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 07 2009
DarthStiller
Hiking13.50 Miles 3,000 AEG
Hiking13.50 Miles   5 Hrs   15 Mns   2.57 mph
3,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Partners partners
joebartels
rdavisiii
sarichter
wallyfrack
This was one of the strangest hikes I've done in recent memory. We started off the day with Wally being the last guy to show up, when he's usually the first. As he pulled up, without getting out of the car, he said, "The alarm didn't go off, I can't go. I don't have anything together. I couldn't find your cell number, so I just drove up quickly to tell you." Wow. One man down and we're not even out of my driveway yet.

We had a fairly normal trip to the TH, until we got to FR112, only a few miles away. At this point, a 60+ lb. black dog ran out of someone's yard making a beeline for the path in front of my vehicle. I swerved into the oncoming lane to avoid him. I tried to get back into the right lane, but the dog was now running alongside my car, chasing it. As I was trying to speed up to cut him off, Joe, Ron, and Stephan were all warning me about the two dogs ahead on the road who were now bearing down on us. WTF!!! Before long, I was swerving along at about 15 mph, with 3 dogs barking like crazy (at 7:15am) trying to catch my car, all while in the wrong lane on a windy two-lane country road. I finally was able to get in the right lane and sped up another 5-10 mph, at which point the 2 bigger dogs just decided to run faster to keep up with us. As I finally pulled away at 35 mph, I could see them in the rear view mirror chugging along at full gallop. It looked like a scene from No Country for Old Men. Just around the next bend after finally getting in the proper lane, two huge Forest Service tanker trucks were coming the other way.

Within another half mile, we ran into a road block. Signs were posted saying "AREA CLOSED" and two Forest Service trucks were parked at a pull out. I talked to the 2 guys there and found out that there's a forest fire that started May 30 towards the top of mountain on the southeast side. All the trails we wanted to do were still open and safe to hike on, but FR112 and the Icehouse CCC TH were closed so that could be used to fight the fire. After rethinking our itinerary, we decided to drive to the top of mountain and begin on the Kellner Trail and hike down first, doing a CW loop instead of CCW as originally planned. Now all we had to do was drive back thru the pack of wild dogs. Fortunately they weren't around on our way back. Maybe Michael Vick was involved.

We finally started our hike at the top of the Kellner Trail at 8am. It was actually very chilly, below 60 degrees, which seemed to be helped by the wind and the shade. At about 1.6 miles in, we stopped to take pictures of a split boulder that fell onto the trail, we heard a hiker who calling towards us as he was booking down the trail. Who was this guy? He seemed to know who we were. Was a he a fellow HAZ hiker? Yes, in fact, it was Wally. WTF!!!! As we drove away from my house after he bailed, I had mentioned that you knew he wasn't going back to sleep. But to not only catch up to us, but to guess which way to drive to find us and how decided to change the hike itinerary at the last second was astounding. I think Wally needs to change his HAZ handle to Superman. If someone else has it, too bad. Joe, make it happen.

The rest of the hike down was normal. Once we got to the TH we weren't allowed to park at, no one was there. So Stephan stole the 24"x36" topo map they left of the area (and where the fire was) and threw away their empty water boxes. Give a Hoot, Tonto National Forest Service Personnel, don't pollute. Jackasses.

Once we started up Sixshoter, Wally and Joe were gone. Sixshooter Trail became a bit of a slog on the way up, but that was offset by the pleasant cool breezes and shade of the pines. I really love this area every time I get near the top. At the junction of the Sixshooter and Telephone Trails, Stephan and I made some markings to let Ron know to stay on the Sixshooter Trail. Once we got to the Sixshooter/Ferndell Junction, I knew we had to wait for Ron so he would know to start walking on FR651 back to the car. Once we got there (at Ferndell Spring), my GPS said we did 13.5 miles.

While we were waiting for Ron, Wally and Joe pulled up in Wally's car. So Wally gave us a 1.6 mile head start and finished quick enough to drive back 2 miles on FR651 to pick us up and shuttle us back to my car. And he's oldest guy out of all of us. WTF!!!

So, while pretty much nothing worked out as we had planned, things still worked out on this hike very well. Probably even better. Thanks to all who showed up, no matter when they finally decided to.
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average hiking speed 2.19 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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