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509 triplogs
Dec 22 2013
friendofThundergod
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 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,133
 Triplogs 868

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Iron Mountain - Tonto NFGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 22 2013
friendofThundergod
Hiking9.30 Miles 2,958 AEG
Hiking9.30 Miles
2,958 ft AEG
 
no photosets
1st trip
Partners partners
Dave1
wallyfrack
Went to the Summit of Iron Mountain with Wally, Denny and Dave. The Summit was the easy part of the day, then we decided to bushwhack off the north end of Iron Mountain, hoping to utilize the washes to reach Reavis Ranch Trail, or Reavis Saddle, which ever came first or easiest..sigh...

Found some interesting cave dwellings on Iron Mountain above the West Pinto Trail, however, nothing substantial in way of ruins or artifacts. A few indicators, like, pottery shards and charred ceilings. Then the fun part of the hike started ;)

Originally, we intended to use the ridge lines to make our way to Reavis Saddle, however, this soon became a near impossibility and we made a bee-line for the creek and nearest wash. Wally found a nice Garmin GPSMAP 62, but did the right thing and found the rightful owner, which was me, as I had dropped it hacking my way down Iron Mountain, thank God!! :y: That pretty much set the tone for this hike, as we: surfed, crawled, slipped, snapped, broke, whacked, cussed and cursed our way across some of the most beautiful and rewarding eastern Superstition's terrain ;) It is hard to give credit to who's great idea this little jaunt through the Supes was, as we tried to gain a consensus before each rewarding phase. However, it did lead to us stumbling across a very rich in artifacts set of ruins, a mystery pair of boots and some medieval torturing devices, or circus tent stakes, verdict is still out on those. Therefore, one must consider this hike a successful one, right?

We finished the day, by checking out a promising cave on the way out, but it proved to be dud.
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3 archives
Nov 28 2013
friendofThundergod
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 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,133
 Triplogs 868

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Cuff Button Trail #276Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Nov 28 2013
friendofThundergod
Backpack36.00 Miles 9,983 AEG
Backpack36.00 Miles3 Days         
9,983 ft AEG
 
This was a three day loop in a lesser traveled area of the Supes. I started at Cuff Button trail,to Spencer Spring Trail to the Arizona Trail, the crosscut to Roger's Trough, then W. Pinto to Campaign Trail then the decommissioned Pinto Peak Trail back to the Cuff Button TH.

Day1
Just getting to the Cuff Button trail head is a task in itself that involves navigating an ant-trail network of roads after you pass the turnoff for Miles TH. I do have that route on GPS if anyone ever gets the itch to do Cuff Button. Cuff Button started off like a breeze the official route I downloaded from HAZ was tracking well and the trail had just received some serious maintenance. However, after passing Cuff Button's most notable attraction, the corral at the northern end of the trail, the trail got increasingly more difficult, to the point that it became a bushwhack and many places. Although, after the initial steep climb,the trail got much easier to follow, and the tread was pretty heavy in spots, from its days as an old road. I passed a couple of prehistoric sites, several springs in disrepair, and a few corrals. Honestly, Cuff Button went much smoother than I thought it would, however, I made a lot of extra work for myself, after getting off trail while coming down Oak Flat, I went on an off-trail adventure fueled by stubbornness, spotting a spring box, and simply losing the trail for a minute. That off-trail excursion took a lot out of the dogs and myself, so I decided I would continue down Spencer Spring until I got tired, knowing there was no way I was going to hike the entire trail, around 4 I found a spot just before you start making your climb out of the Spencer Creek drainage. This trail obviously does not get that much use either, I had tons of firewood, a great spot and I had a huge fire, because it got cool in a hurry, camped at just over 4000 feet.

Day 2

Woke up to frozen over dog dishes, and frozen water. I broke camp and tried to dry out my condensation soaked tent as best as possible before hitting the trail. Was hiking again by 8 in the morning and feeling really good about Spencer Creek Trail, but I could not help but remember reading an HAZ trip-log that cursed the bushwhack of a final climb out of Spencer Creek. That HAZ member could not have been more spot on, the trail was more overgrown than Cuff Button in spots, harder to follow in the upper elevations, eroded, and steep in several spots. I was so relieved to hit FR 650, it made me laugh to myself, how I thought hiking this section of road to Roger's Trough would be the worst part of my hike earlier in the week. After Cuff Button and the southern end of Spencer Creek I embraced the road, and so did the dogs! I passed, or I should I say a convoy of 20 plus jeeps passed me, I briefly chatted with some car campers, hit the Roger's Trough crosscut (thanks Grasshopper) and made my way to Roger's Trough. I had an extended lunch and then started making my climb up W. Pinto. As I approached the pass on Iron Mountain, I notice two hikers literally just off-trail hiking up Iron Mountain. I yelled to them if they were looking for trail and they said yes, I guess they walked off somewhere near Roger's Spring, however, they were now on the opposite side of the major wash that cuts down Iron Mountain there, so I stood on trail near the pass, to give them a frame of reference and they made it to the trail. Anyone who has climbed that section of W. Pinto knows the work those two put in to almost climb that pass, completely off trail. They were actually headed the same way as me, so I ended up passing them a few times over the next couple of days. Although, at 1:30 and not even half way down W. Pinto I had to break the news to them that making it to Fire Line Trail was probably out of the question for them. I was actually doing well on time and already knew where I was camping, so I took a side trip and explored the old Silver Spur Cabin site, which had burnt several years ago. The side trip was worth it, just a half-mile jaunt south up the most obvious wash once you near the riparian area as you descend W. Pinto. Someone has built quite the shack out there, complete with a vanity and everything, it kind of gave me creeps so I made my way back to the W. Pinto trail and headed back down to the Miles/Oak Flat areas. I ran into the same hikers, they were looking for Campaign Trail and debating whether to go for Pinto Divide and Fire Line. I told them I would not attempt, but they were eager and fresh and they made their way down trail, while I hiked not far up Spencer Creek to a nice little camp site I had spotted the day before.

Day 3

All week I debated the best way to make a loop out of Cuff Button, I thought about walking the road back from Miles, but that would have been way too long, I also considered just taking Cuff Button back, but once was enough, so I came up with an alternative on day 2. I would take Campaign Trail past the intersection with Fire Line and take the old alignment of the original Pinto Peak Trail back to Mormon Corral and then just a short walk from there to Cuff Button TH. The Pinto divide went much better than last time, I ended up running into the same two hikers coming down the north side of Pinto Peak and heading down Campaign Creek. They only made it to the highest saddle the night before and stayed there, I guess it was a little cool, but they like it. Campaign Trail is a little bit overgrown in its southern sections, in particular, coming down from the divide can be a little bit of a bushwhack. Not many maps show the old Pinto Peak Trail (213) which use to go from its trail head near Mormon Corral all the way to W. Pinto. Most of it was renamed and became a part of Campaign Trail, however, the 2.5 miles stretch heading to Mormon Corral and the original Pinto Peak TH have been decommissioned. I took that stretch to get back to the Cuff Button TH and found it to be easy to follow, like, I have in the past. The trail is not much of a bushwhack, there is reliable water at Mountain Spring(and a trail camera now??, plus the tread is pretty easy to follow. The couple miles on the road to get to Cuff Button is actually a pretty scenic route through a nice little canyon area with trickling water, and there is almost certainly zero chance of running into a car, as it is a very rugged road, evident by the several rock cairns along the way to guide those not wishing to risk paint and worse damage to their vehicles.

I made it to the car at about three, noticed a big HAZ in the sand in front of my car and wondered all the way until I got home, "who in their right mind would have also been at Cuff Button Trail Head, that trail sees like ten hikers a year!?" Then I got on HAZ and solved the mystery, working on that HAZ sticker :)
Flora
Flora
Catclaw Acacia
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2 archives
Nov 09 2013
friendofThundergod
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 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,133
 Triplogs 868

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Brad's Water Superstition Wilderness, AZ 
Brad's Water Superstition Wilderness, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Nov 09 2013
friendofThundergod
Backpack28.40 Miles 7,547 AEG
Backpack28.40 Miles3 Days         
7,547 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This was a three day two night backpacking trip with the day two destination being Brad's Water, a little known permanent source of water located past the intersection of Red Tanks and Hoolie Bacon Trail in Brad's Canyon.

We really didn't get that early of a start on Saturday, but we were in no rush. We chatted with Joe the volunteer trail guy and then made our way to La Barge Springs, where we planned to grab some water to bring to our camp near the Upper La Barge Box. We ran into a large group of teenagers with three guides, who were part of some second-chance program in Colorado, they were spending 25 days in the Superstitions, with resupplies at various trail heads. When we saw one of the guides she was looking for La Barge Spring, and was very happy after we pointed the way. They had spent the last four days dry camping from Tortilla TH, Hoolie Bacon and down through the Upper La Barge Box (I am assuming this is when the troubled youth decided it appropriate to tag the Hoolie Bacon trail sign, thanks guys..stay classy, hope you enjoy the rest of your stay in Supers). Despite the tagging, I was still impressed with the group, as they had been living off really nasty watering holes for four days when we ran into them and the night before one of the guides had to return nearly all the way to Tortilla to get water from a spot they had found on the second night. We experienced the same fate when we arrived to our campsite, we made decision to go back to La Barge after examining our water options. However, first we did some exploring and checked out some leads from Wally, which we were successful, however, that is really all I can say about those finds. We finished day one with head-lamps because of the commute to get water, it was during this trip back that both of my dogs managed to get sprayed by a skunk, needless to say, they both slept outside.

Day two amounted to a pretty leisurely stroll to Brad's Water via the Upper La Barge Box. I stopped and explored a couple of caves high above trail, but nothing of real substance in either cave. Brad's water is located in Brad's Canyon and to be honest the only real attraction is the water, its a pretty barren area with not a lot going on. I had only been to Brad's Water in the winter prior to this hike, so I decided to go inside and do some exploring. The water is really not that deep, about neck high in spots and it the cave/mine is not overly deep either. My exploring was going well until I made my way to back of grotto to grab a stray cooler. I just touched the ceiling as I made my way back and a fairly large section of rock came crumbling down into water, that was my signal to get out of there. Temperatures seemed to be even warmer the second night, great camping weather.

Day three was a pretty standard hike out Whiskey Springs Trail to the Dutchman, although, I was bummed I took that route as I missed Wally who I knew was doing a clockwise loop of Whiskey Springs and Red Tanks. However, I did run into Larry coming down Whiskey Springs, he recognized the dogs, as most do and we chatted a little. Temperatures got a little warm on that long mundane stretch of Dutchman, which the dogs were very happy to finish.
Fauna
Fauna
Dog
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
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2 archives
Nov 01 2013
friendofThundergod
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 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,133
 Triplogs 868

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Reavis via W Pinto Upper Pine Creek Loop, AZ 
Reavis via W Pinto Upper Pine Creek Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Nov 01 2013
friendofThundergod
Hiking33.55 Miles 9,274 AEG
Hiking33.55 Miles   21 Hrs   21 Mns   1.57 mph
9,274 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I will start by saying that there are certainly better routes for reaching Reavis Ranch. However, West Pinto Trail and the southern portion of Campaign Trail remained a barrier to my personal quest to cover all marked trails in the Superstition Wilderness area. When the opportunity to meet some fellow HAZ members at Reavis came up, I decided the three day weekend would be a perfect opportunity to knock out those sections of trail and then enjoy the festivities at Reavis.

Day one started rather early I made Roger's Trough around 7 and was on trail by about 7:15. W. Pinto starts with a pretty good climb, nothing to crazy, but enough to get your blood pumping, just about a 600 foot climb. From there on out W. Pinto makes a relentless down hill plunge towards the Miles TH area and the confluence of five Superstition Trails: Spencer Spring, Campaign Trail, Cuff Button, Bull Basin, and Paradise Trail. The only hikers I saw on day one, were filtering some water from a catch-basin dug the night before near the Iron Mountain Spring Seep. They were doing the same loop as me, however, they were only expecting to get to the intersection of Fire Line trail and Campaign Trail. I reached the intersection of Campaign Trail and W. Pinto a distance of just under seven miles in just over three hours. The hike down W. Pinto from Roger's Trough goes pretty quick to say the least, likewise, the trail is no-longer the miserable bushwhack that hikers in the past experienced. W. Pinto Trail seems to have been the beneficiary of some extensive trail clearing/maintenance projects in recent years. The intersection with Campaign trail is signed well and there is a large stick corral on the north side of the W. Pinto drainage for further frame of reference. I hung my gear at Campaign Trail and began to make my 1.7 mile trek to grab some water I had cached the weekend before, however, I was pleasantly surprised by a significant source of water approximately a half mile down the trail. I topped off my water and the dogs water, and was happy I only had to go one mile out of my way, rather than nearly four. I left a note at trail sign for the group behind me to let them know where water was, as that was their primary concern when I met them. Once on Campaign Trail you will almost immediately go into your rather daunting climb north to Pinto Divide. Having just topped off about 200oz of water coupled with a three day pack made this climb somewhat of a challenge. However, the views were great and there were a couple of prehistoric sites along the way. Some notable features you will see are Saw Tooth Ridge, Mound Mountain, Iron Mountain and most of the W. Pinto drainage. The southern portion of Campaign Trail was easy to follow and relatively well maintained, hard to go wrong on this trail, as it almost parallels a fence on your right hand side for most of the climb. You will pass through a gate near Pinto Divide, however, this is not quite the end of your climb, as it will represent a bit of a false summit and actually drop you back down into a drainage before making the final ascent of Pinto Divide. The climb will end up being just under 2000 feet and will account for over half of your miles between W. Pinto and Fire Line Trail. You will also notice that after passing through the gate the trail will get progressively worse until you reach Fire Line Trail. The portion of trail from Pinto Divide to Fire Line represented the worse stretch of trail on day one. However, it is downhill and the intersection of Fire Line comes up quick, once you start to see some larger pines, you are nearing Fire Line and an excellent spot to camp. However, any feelings of accomplishment quickly faded as I looked at my next climb, the steep and winding eastern portion of Fire Line Trail. This climb actually went pretty smooth for me, mainly because I knew I was almost there and had a little extra adrenaline going. Nevertheless, keep in mind it is still nearly a 1000 foot climb. After climbing out of the Campaign Creek drainage past the Circle Stone turn-off, it was a pretty easy stroll into Reavis. I completed my day one hike in just about ten hours on the dot, not exactly a speed record, but not horrible for a day just under 18 miles with tons of elevation gained and a full pack. I set up camp, and then made my way to the Gimpy Hippie Fest, hung out a little, met some cool people and relaxed.

My day two itinerary involved borrowing a hike description from the Hiker's Guide to the Eastern Superstitions. I would enter the headwaters of Pine Creek near Fire Line Trail and then locate an old trail, only showed on some very old maps. However, first I checked the water conditions at Whiskey Springs, there was a good amount of water here and a great camp site. For future reference this spring is relatively reliable and the area offers a break from the crowds at Reavis, as well as a better/closer starting point for daily excursions to Circle Stone. I was able to locate a pretty good trail immediately after entering the Pine Creek drainage and was able to follow it down to a corral site, that seemed a little out of place for the Superstitions due to the open flat area and towering pines surrounding it. Nothing really remains of the corral, only a large pile of old fence post and some strands of barbed wire. After the corral I was still able to follow a pretty well cairned route north, however, I made a very poor choice and cut over to the eastern side of Pine Creek to make a route of my own. This is where the hike got really difficult and if viewing my route, I would say stay on western side of Pine Creek and attempt to find the abandoned trail heading north. I ended up getting cliffed a few times in the steep terrain and eventually found a suitable wash for taking directly back down to Pine Creek. By sheer luck I immediately linked up with the northern sections of the trail that I was on early, cairns and all, with a pretty heavy tred to follow. I did come across some water to refill dogs supply and an old hunting or ranching camp, with a very large lean-to shelter. I continued north until Reavis Gap Trail and then made my way back to the Reavis Valley. I met some pretty cool hunters near Boulder Pass, they were on their way to Walnut Spring from Plow Saddle, early in the morning they reported seeing three bear on the trail, which isn't much of a surprise for this area. My Saturday night was almost a carbon copy of night before, organized camp a little and then made my way to the HAZ festivities, for another night of tasty "snacks" and good times.

I didn't hit the trail until after nine the next morning but made great time following Chumley's pretty brisk pace, we made Roger Trough in two hours and thirty-five minutes. We waited for a few other HAZ guys, had a refreshing drink and called it a weekend.

Final Note: The West Pinto route to Reavis would undoubtedly be more suited for a two day schedule with perhaps breaking near Miles TH or camping under the pines at Fire Line Trail. There are several opportunities to explore along this route, and completing it in one day, almost eliminates any chance for this.
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2 archives
Oct 11 2013
friendofThundergod
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 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,133
 Triplogs 868

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Rough Canyon via Reavis Ranch, AZ 
Rough Canyon via Reavis Ranch, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Oct 11 2013
friendofThundergod
Backpack38.00 Miles 9,293 AEG
Backpack38.00 Miles2 Days         
9,293 ft AEG
 
1st trip
This hike started on Friday night at 8:30 P.M. from the Reavis Ranch Trail Head. Located North of Reavis Ranch trail #109. The hike in was very pleasant, a nice cool night with nearly 50% illumination from the moon. I had no difficulties following Reavis Ranch Trail in the dark, it is a former road after all. However, stick with your comfort levels when it comes to hiking at night. The hike into Reavis Ranch where I camped was 10.2 miles, and I completed it in four hours on the dot, with taking one dedicated break at Windy Pass to feed dogs, and eat a couple of snacks. I spent a couple hours getting settled in and going over route with my friend who I met at Reavis and then hit the rack just after 3 in the morning to catch a few hours of sleep before big day. It should be noted that the underlying goal of hike was to find a set or ruins above Rough Canyon, that a fellow hikearizona.com member had given me some details about.

Day two started from Reavis Ranch. After going over the map in morning we agreed that even though we had a solid route to ruins from White Mountain, we would try entering Rough Canyon from the Plow Saddle Spring area and Frog Tanks trail. This would prove to be our mistake, as we did not find the ruins, due to an inability to get to the angle needed to see the cave which housed the ruins. The cave was high above the canyon floor, and impossible to see from below, we accepted that shortly after reaching Rough Canyon.

However, the day was not lost, as I got to draw another line on my map through a very rugged and remote area of the Superstition Wilderness Area. Our hike from Reavis Ranch consisted of Reavis Ranch Trail 109 north to the intersection with Plow Saddle Trail and headed West 1.5 miles to Plow Saddle Spring. From Plow Saddle Spring we followed Frog Tanks until we found the best spot to start heading South off of Frog Tanks Trail and towards the ridge line we would be using to make our way off-trail to Rough Canyon. From here on out remember this is just "a" way, its certainly probably not "the" way to do Rough Canyon. We headed south off Frog Tanks Trail into Willow Creek, from there we headed west a short distance and immediately started bushwhacking our way up hill-top 4922, which would mark the beginning of the ridge line we followed all the way to Rough Canyon. Once through bushwhacking, the ridgeline did not present an overly difficult hike, there were some very well defined bear trails and perhaps old cattle/horse trails. But there were certainly some over-grown spots as well, we stayed generally to the South side of ridge and seemed to do alright. We followed the ridgeline on a southwesterly course until the final major hill (5384). The views from the ridgeline were expansive with Four Peaks to the North, and even Pinto Mine to the east. We stayed east of hilltop 5384 and made our decent into Rough Canyon. We could tell right away that we were not at the proper place for viewing ruins, and to get to other side of Rough Canyon would have taken some time, so we chose to just head down Rough Canyon to Frog Tanks Trail and hope that we might catch an indicator or possible glimpse of potential areas for ruins, but no luck. We picked up a really nice trail that took us right down into an almost out of place pine forest. There were some very tall strands of pine, it wasn't too brushy and there were signs of bear everywhere, scat, tracks, etc. it must be their hangout. Rough Canyon was your typical off-trail Supers Canyon, probably a little bit worse than Trap Canyon and similar to Fish Creek and Tortilla in spots. However, it was slow going, expect a typical canyoneering speed of about one plus miles an hour, yet much slower for some stretches. I did Rough Canyon with my dogs, but would not recommend it to anyone. The canyon offered several dangerous areas for humans and dogs alike. Likewise, this loop ended just a few tenths of a mile shorter than 18 miles, so your pooch is going to have to be in really good shape. The canyon had significant water compared to how dry it was everywhere else. Therefore,if this hike is done during a wet winter, the water may prove to be too much of an obstacle keep that in mind. There will certainly be some deep pools and deep wades.

Rough Canyon ends at Rogers Canyon which is also where the Frog Tanks trail crosses. If trying to pinpoint Rough Canyon from Frog Tanks its entranced is marked by a noticeable rock spire and natural arch. I am not going to lie it was around 8:30 P.M. at this point and we spent nearly 20 minutes looking for the actual Frog Tanks trail, it was a little grown over and where it crossed Rough Canyon it had been eroded. It felt great to be through Rough Canyon, but we were nowhere near finished we still had Frog Tanks to navigate at night, oh and we also had to regain the nearly 1500 feet in elevation we lost. Other than Blanco getting sprayed by a skunk the hike back to Reavis was pretty standard, we took some very liberal breaks, and showed up to camp after midnight. I inhaled a mountain house and went to bed, a little disappointed about not getting to ruins, but pleased with the completion of a challenging day. Blanco meanwhile earned himself a spot outside the tent on this night, due to his run in with the skunk along Frog Tanks Trail.

The next morning we slept in a little and very lazily made our way back to Reavis TH. Sunny enough on the hike out, that the shade was appreciated at times, however, pretty nice hiking temps overall made nicer by strong breeze. My body was aching a little by the time I reached car, and dogs were certainly beat. For good reason though, as the final mileage for hike tallied 38.3. Anyone who has spent time in Supers knows that is a hefty weekend.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
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2 archives
Jan 19 2013
friendofThundergod
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 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,133
 Triplogs 868

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
JF Trail #106Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 19 2013
friendofThundergod
Hiking18.70 Miles 3,926 AEG
Hiking18.70 Miles
3,926 ft AEG
 
1st trip
JF Ranch Trail was technically the start of my HAZ life.

I was doing a very unspectacular Tortilla to Angel Basin over-night and taking advantage of the MLK hoiday when I met two people at Angel Basin who encouraged me to join this thing called HAZ. To this day I can't remember their screen names or real names, however, I know they were doing some trail maintenance on Frog Tanks that day, camped at Angel Basin and it was a man and woman.

Nevertheless, I went home created an account, probably made an ass of myself a few times on forum, went into lurking mode for several months and finally started posting in November.

Oh I am also working on catching up my links, I want my red dot in Supes ;)
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Dec 26 2012
friendofThundergod
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 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,133
 Triplogs 868

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Tortilla via Peralta TH, AZ 
Tortilla via Peralta TH, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Dec 26 2012
friendofThundergod
Backpack33.50 Miles 13,587 AEG
Backpack33.50 Miles4 Days         
13,587 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
This is another hike from last year, however, I think its alright to post now, because it is right around the same time of year, and with the extended holidays coming up, some may be looking for some nice three and four day treks. This hike certainly offered some challenging changes in elevations, cold temperatures, and solitude. Most seasoned backpackers would find this to be a moderate hike in terms of difficulty, route finding (all trail), and total miles.

We started at Peralta TH the day after Christmas. Our chosen route was the Dutchman's Trail to Coffee Flats, to Red Tanks, Hoolie Bacon, then Peter's Trail back to the Dutchman's Trail and finishing up on Bluff Springs Trail. If you are into simply drawing new lines on your map and knocking out some remote areas of the Supers this hike may be for you.

Day one was our highest mile day of entire hike. We did not stop much, mainly because of the cool temperatures, we had some Christmas Tamales at a nice deep pool of water along Red Tanks, did a quick side trip to explore what proved to be an old Indian dwelling that utilized a deceptively deep cave. Although, the cave was not hard to locate only a short distance into Red Tanks Trail, it seemed not many people had been, because there was literally plate size pot sherds littering the ground. Our day one goal was to stay at Brad's Water which is in a side canyon/wash before you reach Hoolie Bacon, however, once we got there, we chose to just push forward, as we knew water was not going to be an issue. For future reference Brad's Water always has water, I will put my name and honor to that, if you are ever in a pinch during hot months, there will be water. However, it is not easy to find, I don't know if it was man-made, but it is essentially a small cave or rock grotto that has filled with water, about waste deep and pretty far back. We chose to camp our first night near the opening/beginning of Trap Canyon, just off Hoolie Bacon. We ran into the only people we saw on entire hike around five or so in the afternoon, they were doing a similar loop in reverse, except they were going through La Barge Box, definitely a more direct loop than ours. It got extremely cold the first night, our water froze and we started our second morning with what would be a trend for the first two days, thawing out our tents, recovering our gear, and huddling around the fire. For an additional side trip, if camped near the origins of Trap Canyon, a short walk down the canyon will take you to a ground level cave dwelling, with remnants of former walls and several grinding holes.

Our day two was relatively short in miles, but very scenic, and cold. Hoolie Bacon and Red Tanks both seem to really meander along and drag out at points. The day was made interesting by a pretty good little snow storm in the early afternoon and a fun descent down Horse Ridge. There are opportunities for side-trips as well in this area, for example, one can check out the Lost Dutchman Mine Jr. which is located near intersection of Hoolie Bacon and JF Trail. However, we have never been overly impressed by this cave/maybe old mine so we just pushed on towards Indian Springs. There was no need to find an actual spring, however, we did find the old troughs and some piping. Indian Springs proved to be another really cold night, but lets be real we built a very large fire. We camped in a pretty well-established spot, in fact, someone's entire camp seemed to have been just abandoned in place there, but it was in a sad state.

Day three we continued down Peter's Trail, took a GPS reading at Kane Spring and made our way towards Peter's Mesa, which begins with a pretty good climb. We ran into the same group from day before near Peter's Mesa, chatted a little and continued mission. We went off-trail around Peter's Mesa and dropped down into one of our favorite canyons to take a short-cut to camp at one of our favorite spots. The third night must have literally been 15 degrees warmer and we woke up to very warm temps on day four. It was kind of weird, after spending the first two nights in rather unfamiliar areas we kind of felt like we were already home, even though we were still in the Supers. Our hike out was pretty uneventful, just taking your standard well-traveled western Supes trails to Peralta TH. In fact, I finished in short sleeves and shorts, which was a far cry from my opening morning picture.
Fauna
Fauna
Tarantula
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Jul 28 2012
friendofThundergod
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 Guides 28
 Routes 314
 Photos 9,133
 Triplogs 868

39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Yellow Jacket Spring-Superstitions, AZ 
Yellow Jacket Spring-Superstitions, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jul 28 2012
friendofThundergod
Hiking6.40 Miles 900 AEG
Hiking6.40 Miles
900 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Just an easy day hike taken from the Carlson and Stewart book. At one time Yellow Jacket Spring was pretty reliable from excerpts in the book, however, time has certainly done its toll on this area. Looked for signs of the old road along the lower sections of Pine Creek, then made my way to spring and trough areas. Good water at spring, however, it is in need of maintenance, some digging perhaps and clearing out of brush around small seep in cavern it originates from may be needed. I went in the Old Pine Creek TH which utilized the site of a pretty extensive ranch and corral area, however, nothing seems operational and road deteriorates very quickly, leading to a short road walk before reaching main corral area. The Carlson and Stewart book provides excellent spot on direction for getting to the spring. Although, I would not put this on my must do list.
Named place
Named place
Yellow Jacket Spring - Two Bar
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Jun 04 2010
friendofThundergod
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39 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Isle Royale, MI 
Isle Royale, MI
 
Backpack avatar Jun 04 2010
friendofThundergod
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1st trip
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So this backpack was a blast from the past. Ironically, I did not hike Isle Royale until I moved to AZ, despite living most of my life in Michigan. Although, anyone who lives in Michigan will agree that the Isle Royale might as well be Arizona, due to its remote location.

I posted the trip for three reasons, to gauge potential interest from HAZers for a return trip this summer and to give some of my family members in Michigan something more local to look at, as they live vicariously through my AZ trips :)I would like to do a portage trip of interior of island and the numerous lakes this summer. A lot is based on money and logistics, but I think I have logistics covered..now about the money part..sigh Lastly, I am bringing a little attention to the Winter Wolf Study 2014, its the longest standing predator prey relationship study in the world. However, it may be ending soon, as the island is down to six extremely inbred wolves. Long story shot, Moose swam to island, wolves crossed over on ice-bridge 50 years ago, wolves cant go home, but eat the heck out of moose things are great. No genetic diversity leads to weaker wolf with higher mortality, recently went from three packs to six wolves. Only hope is that cold weather this year will convince a rogue wolf to make ice-bridge journey and add genetic diversity to island, which saved population about twenty years ago. These ice-bridges are about a once in 50 year occurrence, so this may be the wolves' last shot, and also the moose. Why the moose as well you ask? Without wolves to keep their population down most biologists agree moose will literally eat themselves to death and the new fir buds they feed on will cease to exist within a matter of years. So an interesting debate is brewing in Michigan. Reintroduce genetic diversity to wolves through breeding, plant more wolves on island, or let nature run its course? Might be a good forum topic as more facts from this year's study are released, the study is great reading, they update every day or so, with detailed logs and pictures, its good reading for nerdy types, I don't think they have posted anything yet this year, but its really cool to follow. isleroyalewolf.org/ ... /135

This was my final backpack before returning to my old stomping grounds (Afghanistan) and I went with a good friend from high school. Luckily it wasn't my "last" hiking trip.

Details of trip are too fuzzy to recall now, but it was a great trip! Your typical warm 40 degree beautiful June days in really really northern Michigan with a just above freezing Lake Superior, great views of Canada, rescuing a woman who was a tad out of her element, good fishing, moose, wolf scat, tracks, an awesome catch and great times...

So I ask, who is coming with me summer 2014, maybe a little early to post on event board..lol..But I do intend to return this summer. I want to canoe, portage, hike and fish island, some real gems on this island, even the inland lakes will put most AZ bodies of water to shame, with depths over 180 feet for some lakes, and they don't have to stock the fish! nps.gov/isro/index.htm

Finally, little known fact, Isle Royale is the least visited of National Parks in America, however, it has the highest percentage of return visits, I would like to contribute to this statistic.

Last cool fact, Isle Royale is home to the world's largest lake on an island, with an island within that lake, containing another island with a small lake on that island..if you were able to follow that :)
Culture
Culture
Boat / Ship Cairn
Named place
Named place
Copper Harbor
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2 archives
average hiking speed 1.57 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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