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432 triplogs
Nov 11 2010
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Chevelon Lake #611Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 11 2010
Tim
Hiking1.50 Miles 400 AEG
Hiking1.50 Miles      30 Mns   3.00 mph
400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Six of us camped out at the end of FS #180 on the southwest side of the lake Wednesday night so as to get an early start fishing Thursday morning. It was a chilly 27 degrees during the night but we had a huge bonfire and a good deal of whiskey to keep us warm. The trail on this side of the lake is well defined and not nearly as steep as the lesser used trails on the east side. This well marked trail descends 400 feet in a 1/2 mile to the lake before continuing along the shore. For the first hour it was still below freezing and ice kept forming on the tip of my rod but with no wind to speak of it was a beautiful and comfortable morning. I was going after the spawning brown trout in the shallows by the inlet with no luck. I did end up catching 4 rainbow trout further north in the deeper water but they were all of the 12 inch variety and not outside of the 10 to 14 inch slot. As we were leaving a few guys were coming down with float tubes and kayaks.
_____________________
Oct 22 2010
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Chevelon Lake #611Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 22 2010
Tim
Hiking1.50 Miles 500 AEG
Hiking1.50 Miles      50 Mns   1.80 mph
500 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This was more of a fishing trip than a hiking trip. 7 of us hiked down to the middle of the lake from the east side for a day of trout fishing. We had camped the previous night off of FS #170 on what I believe is FS #9520 at Wagon Draw. It was a 2 mile drive to the end of FS #9520-I before a 3/4 mile hike down to the lake. AEG was roughly 500 feet. From the end of the road on the topo map we headed north down a drainage before circling around to the west to take the ridge down to the inlet. It was a steep and rocky descent with no real trail. (20 minutes down and 30 minutes up. The "up" is a real buzz kill.) The shore around this lake is also very steep and rocky which makes it difficult to get around. The fishing was pretty good as one of the guys caught a 16 inch brown trout. The rest of us couldn't do better than 12 to 14 inch rainbows which were still inside the slot. A beautiful day in a very pretty canyon.
_____________________
Aug 19 2010
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Thousand Island Lake loop, CA 
Thousand Island Lake loop, CA
 
Backpack avatar Aug 19 2010
Tim
Backpack20.50 Miles 3,350 AEG
Backpack20.50 Miles   10 Hrs   45 Mns   1.91 mph
3,350 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This was a quickly planned 3 day back packing trip that Carolyn and I went on in the High Sierras just outside of Mammoth Lakes, California. It was a shorter mileage trip with less AEG so as to allow extra down time for fishing, reading and relaxing. The itinerary was to take the High Trail out of Agnew Meadows up to the Clark Lakes. The next day we would travel over to Garnet lake via Thousand Island, Emerald and Ruby Lakes. On day 3 we would exit down past Shadow Lake to the River Trail back to Agnew Meadows.

DAY #1
We took the mandatory shuttle ride from the Mammoth Mountain Ski Lodge to the Agnew Meadow Trailhead and pushed off at 8:40. The trailhead elevation was 8,300 feet and the temperatures were in the low 60's on this clear and sunny day. The daytime high probably got into the mid 70's. (The weather was to be perfect for the trip as it usually is during the month of August.) The High Trail starts climbing switchbacks right away as it heads up the east side of the San Joaquin River Valley. Along the way we were treated to distant views of Shadow Lake and its drainage down into the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River. This was to be our exit in a couple of days. We traveled the 6.75 miles to Summit lake in 3 1/2 hours and had 1,650 of AEG. However, the bulk of the climbing was over in the first 90 minutes as the trail then began to level off along the ridge line. We stopped here for lunch and some unsuccessful fishing. We were using salmon eggs, power bait and spinners but didn't get a bite. It was the middle of the day but I believe this lake is too small and shallow which probably resulted in some winter kill. After a couple of hours of futile fishing we climbed up over Agnew Pass for the short 1 mile hike to the west side of the Clark Lakes where we pitched camp at an elevation of 9,800 feet. This was followed by more futile fishing, (are you noticing a trend here?), and a pork tenderloin and saffron rice dinner that couldn't be beat. Clark Lake is also very shallow and I believe subject to winter kill. (It's always good to have ready excuses- smile.) We caught a couple of small Brook Trout that I was surprised could even get their mouth around the hook. The temperatures got down in the low 40's that night and we accumulated quite a bit of condensation inside the tent. We had feared a major mosquito problem but that wasn't the case. A ranger on the trail had told us that despite the late winter season this year, the mosquitoes had really begun to die off that week. We had no major mosquito concentrations at all. The only downside was that due to fire restrictions covering the entire area, we couldn't have a campfire. Overall, the entire day came in at 7.7 miles in 4 hours, (not including futile fishing attempts), with 1,900 feet of AEG.

DAY #2
We broke camp at 9:00 and headed over to Thousand Island Lake. This trip had a couple of steady climbs in it as the trail typically crests over a pass before dropping down to the next lake in the chain. Along the way, we encountered another backpacker, Chris, that had gotten turned around and was on the wrong trail. There are quite a few intersecting trails in this area and he didn't have a very good map so his confusion was somewhat understandable. He joined us for our jaunt over to Thousand Island Lake and we covered the 2 miles in a little over an hour. This is a pretty lake but one can't really take in the entire beauty of this lake from its eastern outlet where we were fishing from. In retrospect, we should have hiked further along its north shore but it was very windy and we didn't want to take the time. This is a big and deep lake which had been reported with good fishing. We had no luck so me climbed up the next little pass and over to Emerald and Ruby Lakes. All of these high alpine lakes are drop dead gorgeous. Emerald Lake didn't have easy access and looked pretty shallow so we continued to Ruby Lake. As we descended down to Ruby lake we could see that it was much deeper and nestled right up against the snow covered rocky cliffs. We had lunch here and fished for a couple of more hours to no avail. We also worked our Kindles. The frustrating part about the fishing here was that we could see good sized trout checking out our lures and baits, but we just couldn't entice them to bite. The guide at the outfitting store had told us that these alpine fish were "as dumb as rocks" and would bite at anything. Thus, our lack of success was somewhat discouraging.

We packed up and climbed the switchbacks up and over the next pass to Garnet Lake. Along the way we came across two older gentlemen that had been day hiking to Garnet from their base came at Thousand Island Lake. They provided a glowing fishing report as they had caught over 20 fish between them, (I figured a dozen fish after the BS factor- smile), and many of them were very good sized. Like with most folks we encountered, we exchanged a few stories and wished them well before heading on our way. Coming down the pass I could take in the entire lake and without a doubt, Garnet Lake is the jewel of this entire loop. Its western end was butted up against the mountains as well which was very picturesque. However, the wind was howling. At the advice of the two fishermen, we camped at a bomb of a campsite on the north side of the lake and west of the outlet at an elevation of roughly 9,700 feet. (Camping is restricted to being not within 1/4 mile of the outlet.) This campsite was on a small point with great access right down to the water. We took a swim and showered up but delayed setting up camp and giving fishing a try until the wind died down.

As we relaxed and looked around the potential camp sites we noticed that all were underneath trees or next to large boulders and had been built up for maximum wind protection. It was then that we realized that the wind wasn't going to die down on this exposed point. We sucked it up and started throwing out some Kastmasters with a salmon egg on them and enticed a good sized 14 inch Rainbow Trout to join us for dinner. I scored it and filled the scores with garlic powder and some Emeril spices before frying it up in garlic butter and olive oil. It was delicious! However, between our fishing licenses and lost lures, we were into this "dinner" to the tune of $55 so it had better taste good. The wind finally died down a little and we enjoyed red wine and whiskey while watching the moon set over the lake. There were no signs of mosquitoes whatsoever. The entire day came in at just 4.2 miles in 2 1/2 hours with 650 feet of AEG.

DAY #3
We broke camp at 8:40 and headed up the switchbacks on the south side of Garnet Lake before beginning the long descent down to Shadow Creek. This was a lovely hike through a forest of Lodgepole Pines. The creek was rushing and flowing into Shadow Lake which was also very pretty. It took us 2 hours to get to Shadow Lake where we stopped for a short break and a bite to eat. Here we began to encounter lots of day hikers and pack horses doing various loops and one way treks up to various other lakes. From Shadow Lake the trail descended down to the Middle Fork of the San Joaquin River and the River Trail. This trail was very sandy and somewhat tiring. That, and we just wanted to be done at this point. The trail ended with a gradual 300 foot climb from the river valley up to the Agnew Meadow Trailhead. This leg came in at 8.6 miles in 4 1/4 hours with 800 feet of AEG. All told, the entire "relaxing" trip came in at 20.50 miles in 10 3/4 hours with 3,350 feet of AEG. Later that afternoon, we got to enjoy an outdoor concert and wine tasting festival in Mammoth Lakes which was a real treat and served to top off the trip.
_____________________
Jul 22 2010
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Boulder Creek to Hoh Valley Visitor Ctr, WA 
Boulder Creek to Hoh Valley Visitor Ctr, WA
 
Backpack avatar Jul 22 2010
Tim
Backpack33.00 Miles 7,150 AEG
Backpack33.00 Miles   20 Hrs   15 Mns   1.63 mph
7,150 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
For our annual backpacking trip this year, our group of 9 traveled to the Olympic National Park in Washington. Our 3 day itinerary had us hiking from the Boulder Creek Trailhead, (ie: Olympic Hot Springs Road), over to the Hoh River Visitor Center as part of a 33 mile shuttle hike. We had made reservations at two group camping sites, (7 Mile Group Site and Olympic Guard Station Group Site), along the way and each day was of similar distance although the first two days had high passes to negotiate. Our "nine" were Doug, Alex, Carolyn, Dennis, Angela, Lenore, Denise, Mark and I.

DAY #1
We pushed off for the Olympic Hot Springs at 8:15 Thursday morning having had our hotel in Port Angeles assist us in getting all of our participants and their gear to the trailhead. (We'd placed the exit Suburban at the Hoh River Visitor Center the day before.) While it was overcast, the temps were in the upper 50's and it never rained. Soon the clouds burned off and it was sunny with the temps in the upper 60's and/or lower 70's for the next 3 days. And there were very few bugs or mosquitoes the entire time. Chamber of Commerce weather which is the norm for this time of year. The trail for first couple of miles to the Hot Springs is a former paved road that used to take vehicle traffic to the Hot Springs up until the early 80's. This paved section is scheduled to be pulled out next month as part of a trail reclamation project. The Hot Springs were over 100 degrees and smelled of sulfur. They were rather unimpressive in that the pool was only a foot or two deep so it wouldn't lend itself to serious soaking at the end of a hike. The woods here are much denser than any I've ever been in and have lots more ferns and ground cover, especially on the Rain Forest Side. There were numerous creek crossings so a lack of water was never an issue. Soon after the intersection with the Boulder Lake Trail and just before the climbing began in earnest, we came across a bridge that was out. The creek was 15 feet wide, deeper, and moving more rapidly. We had to bushwhack downstream so as to find a favorable way to cross while keeping our feet dry. This was one of the 2 "bridge out" crossings that the rangers had warned us about, but it wasn't too difficult provided that one took one's time. It was a slow steady climb through the trees the rest of the day up to Appleton Pass.

Shortly after lunch and just past the upper meadow at 4,200 feet the trail began to change. The peninsula had a heavy snow year coupled with a very cold June. This resulted in an unusually high amount of snow at the upper elevations. The trail became much steeper with snow covered patches the higher we went. We encountered patches of snow at 4,200 feet. The pass itself was at 5,100 feet and the last 700 feet of elevation on the north side of the pass was all snow covered with 3 to 4 feet of snow. This was very much like hiking across a black diamond ski run and there was quite a bit of exposure. If you slipped, you were going to slide until you hit something. (That something would be trees.) No big deal when you were in the trees as you wouldn't slide far, but some of the traverses went across long steep bowls where you were looking at a 200 to 400 yard downhill run. (No moguls though.) We didn't have ice axes or ropes to tie hiking partners together, but we made due. I found it worked best if I shortened my high side hiking pole to 18 inches. That way it was much easier to plant that pole for a self arrest in the case of a slide. We just hammered in each boot a few times and made a step to use for the next foot placement. It was an exhausting process and we were all sweating like pigs and really sucking down the water. Fortunately, the elevation wasn't so high as to have "thin air" which could have been really debilitating. I had an equipment failure and quickly had to replace the nipple on my Camelback or else lose all my water. After replacing the lost part, I darn near lost my balance putting my pack back on. (A stupid and careless move.) That fall would have left a mark!

We probably lost the trail a few times but generally took the path of least resistance to the pass above us. While this climb was a long and slow process, it was relatively safe, especially if you were at the end of the line. (smile) And once the trail got into the sun, the snow got softer and easier to make a stair step with. It was a long slow grind that just took time. Our first 3 hikers, (Lenore, Mark, and Dennis), alternated and effectively blazed the stairway for the rest of us. A few falls, but no major slides. It took us darn near 90 minutes to negotiate the last 700 feet to the pass. From there it was 1,800 feet downhill to our first camp site on the Sol Duc River. On the trail going down, snow was less of an issue as the trail was on the south side of the pass and largely in the trees.

We got to camp at approximately 4:30. Our camp site was above the Sol Duc River so we had to hike down to pump water and bathe. The water was deep and fast running here but extremely cold. That night we enjoyed an Italian sausage and pasta dinner that Mark and Carolyn prepared with lots of red wine that couldn't be beat. We were all tired little campers and hit the racks at around 10:30. The night time temperatures were wonderful and never got below the low 50's. All told, day #1 encompassed 11.6 miles in 8 1/4 hours, (1.4/mph), including about 1 1/2 hours in breaks. The AEG came in at 3,750 feet.

DAY #2
We got a later start than I wanted as we didn't push off until 9:30. But since its light until 9:00 up there it's hard to get worked up over a later start. We had some options when it came to "down time". This was the day that I was most concerned about as the pass over Bogachiel Peak was a bit higher at 5,400 feet and the exposure looked to be worse along the length of the High Divide Trail. The trail wound up the Sol Duc River and quickly began to climb in earnest. We soon came to the second downed bridge crossing and carefully negotiated it without anybody going feet wet. The creek wasn't too deep here and only 10 feet across. The climb up this side ended up being easier than the day before. The trail followed more of a glade opening so the snow was much less and when we did come across patches of snow at 4,600 feet, there was no real exposure. We encountered quite a few mountain goats as we approached Heart Lake which was ice free so we were able to pump some water. From Heart Lake we had to climb through the "slush" up to the High Divide where we stopped for lunch but again, there was no real exposure.

After lunch we hiked roughly 2 miles along the divide to Bogachiel Peak. Despite being relatively free of trees, there was still a great deal of snow to slosh through but the climbs were gradual with no steep slopes. The views on both sides of the divide of Mount Olympus and the Seven Lakes Basin were simply stunning! We could see forever. Just before Bogachiel Peak there was a steep climb up through the snow but no real exposure, just some hard work. From the peak we could look down on our second campsite on the Hoh River some 4,500 feet below us. This was to be a nasty and steep descent. Descending the peak we had to traverse a couple of steeper "black diamond" slopes but the snow was really soft so making good steps wasn't difficult, just slow. The traverse across the bowl right after the peak must have run for a mile down to Hoh Creek and I would have killed for a pair of skis! (Truth be told, a pair of skis would have probably killed me- smile.) As we came over the ridge we were treated to our first views of high alpine and pristine Hoh Lake. It was completely ice free and a very dark blue. When we got down to it we took a break to take a dip and pump water. This lake water wasn't as cold as the mountain creek and river waters. Mark pulled out his rod & reel and caught 4 small Brook Trout in 15 to 20 minutes. The trail continued its steep descent down the switchbacks through a burn out area on its way to the Hoh River. It took us 3 hours to get from Hoh Lake down to our camp site at the Olympic Guard station on the Hoh River and my knees and ankles were feeling it. We arrived at 6:30 and the two days had taken their toll as we were all pretty tired.

Washing up in the river was tough as it was very shallow near our camp site, (we were too tired & sore to explore along it for a better pool), and extremely cold. Mark and Carolyn cooked us up a second dinner that couldn't be beat. Chicken curry & rice with some left over red wine and a combination of scotch and whiskey. (One has to make due with what one has- smile.) All told, the day's hike came in at 12.3 miles in 9 hours, including about another 1 1/2 hours of breaks. The AEG was 2,900 feet.

DAY #3
This final day promised to be much easier than the first 2 days as it was a gentle 9.1 mile hike along the Hoh River. We pushed off at 9:00 and maintained a brisk pace through the rain forest. There wasn't a lot to see as the forest is very dense along the river. Periodically we would catch glimpses of the river which meandered amongst the gravel sand bars. Along the way we encountered a herd of elk across the river and many more people as we got closer to the Visitor Center at the trail's end. The trail was in very good condition and we were all hiking like horses heading for the barn. The promise of cold beers in the suburban and greasy cheese burgers in Forks provided ample motivation. We covered the last 9.1 miles in 3 hours, no breaks, with 500 feet of AEG. The total hike was just at 33 miles with 7,150 feet of AEG.
_____________________
Jun 19 2010
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Fred Haught Trail #141Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 19 2010
Tim
Hiking6.70 Miles 550 AEG
Hiking6.70 Miles   2 Hrs   15 Mns   2.98 mph
550 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This was a really pleasant hike on a beautiful sunny day. The temperatures were in the low 60's when Carolyn and I started at 9:30 and rose to the low 70's when we finished just short of noon. (It was 104 in the Valley.) Originally, we were going to start from the General Springs Cabin and do either an out and back for 13.5 miles, an out and back on Houston Brothers Trail to FS #300 which would have made for an 18+ mile loop, or an out and back along FS #95 hoping to hitch a ride. This south to north route is a really gentle hike that runs along lots of water and is gradually down grade. There are just two small drainages to trek up and out of. We had lots of energy and were making good time. When we got to the trail's end at FS #95 by the Pinchot Cabin, we found two families car camping by the stream. Wanting to save time for fishing later that afternoon, we asked them if they wouldn't mind giving us a lift back to the turnoff for the General Springs Cabin which they, (ie: Ted), were more than happy to do. Really nice and generous people. All told, this one way jaunt came in at 6.7 miles in 2 1/4 hours with 550 feet of AEG.
_____________________
May 01 2010
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Dripping Springs from WoodburyGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar May 01 2010
Tim
Backpack8.75 Miles 1,100 AEG
Backpack8.75 Miles   4 Hrs      2.19 mph
1,100 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Seeing that the temperatures were forecast to be well below normal, I thought this would be a good opportunity to get in a Superstitions camping trip before the heat got turned on. When we turned onto FS 172 there was still about 2 feet of running water at the initial creek crossing which promised that we'd have plenty of water on our hike. Carolyn and I pushed off from the Woodbury Trailhead at 1:45 on a beautiful Saturday afternoon with the temperatures in the upper 60's. There wasn't another car in the parking lot and we didn't see a sole the entire weekend. Our route out was by way of Woodbury Cabin and on the return trip we just took the road back from JF Ranch. There was still plenty of water running down the creek. So much so that we paid extra attention to the cairns that took the trail out of the creekbed. (Usually, we just hoof it up and down the dry creek.) There is a good portion of this trail that runs up above the creek on the south side that I had never been on before which made the day interesting. We enjoyed a bomb of a campsite at Dripping Springs as we pitched our tent right on the sandy shores of the creek. It was a regular babbling brook which made for awesome background music. After the wind died down, we got a large fire going and enjoyed several platypuses of red wine with our meal. The skies were clear and the stars were out. It didn't get very cold at night as the temperatures stayed in the lower 50's. All told, the trip came in at 8.75 miles in 4 hours with 1,100 feet of AEG.
_____________________
Apr 10 2010
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Thompson Peak from Dixie Mine THPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 10 2010
Tim
Hiking8.25 Miles 2,000 AEG
Hiking8.25 Miles   3 Hrs      2.75 mph
2,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
Doug, Mark and I pushed off from the Fountain Hills Trailhead at 7:30 on a beautiful Saturday morning with the temps in the low 60's. By the time we finished the temps were in the upper 70's. The actual trailhead is .5 miles from the designated parking area. It's a nice trail for the first 2 miles before intersecting the road at the Dixie Mine. Over the next 2 miles to the top, this hike then becomes just stupid steep. It's so steep in spots that they had to pour concrete to mitigate the erosion. A rather silly place to put a road. We came across a few people that make this trail part of their weekly workout. No thanks! My calves and quads were screaming. It took us an hour and 40 minutes to get to the top, but the views made it all worthwhile. We thought about bushwhacking down the south side of Thompson Peak to the Talisan Trail but decided that the conditions were too ripe for snakes. A good decision that turned out to be as as we came across two buzz worms on the way back. Coming down was hard on the toes but traction wasn't an issue as the road is in good shape and well maintained. The first rattler was on the side of the road and pointed out to us by 3 ladies that darn near stepped on it. It was a big one, (3+ feet), but wasn't coiled up or moving real fast as it was still a little cool. It never even rattled. The 2nd Diamondback we came across was a bit smaller but in a foul mood. Doug almost got tagged by this critter which was coiled up in the strike position right next to the trail. He walked right past it but didn't hear its rattle as he was listening to an i-pod. A lesson to us all. All told, the hike came in at 8.25 miles in 3 hours including a 10 minute break at the top. I had the AEG at a little over 2,000 feet.
_____________________
Apr 03 2010
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Tom's Thumb Trail - MSPPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 03 2010
Tim
Hiking8.50 Miles 1,700 AEG
Hiking8.50 Miles   3 Hrs      2.83 mph
1,700 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Mark, Doug, Paul and I pushed off from the North Trailhead at 8:45 for a quick work out. It was a popular place on a beautiful Saturday morning so we had to park at the overflow lot. The temperature was 58 when we started and 71 when we finished. This is one steep trail that is always a lung buster climbing the 900 feet up to the saddle. We got to the saddle in under 30 minutes where we split up. Mark and Doug went on up to the Thumb and returned to the parking lot via the climbers trail which meandered over and around some huge boulders. Paul and I headed down the East End Trail and over to the Gateway Center via the Windgate and Gateway Loop trails. We had previously left our vehicles at the Gateway Center. The point-to-point hike came in at 8.5 miles in 3 hours with 1,700 feet of AEG. Paul had us on a pretty quick pace so my quads and calfs were screaming. However, that just made the pizza and beers at Cafe Portabello taste even better.
_____________________
Mar 13 2010
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Tom's Thumb Trail - MSPPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 13 2010
Tim
Hiking8.25 Miles 1,500 AEG
Hiking8.25 Miles   3 Hrs   15 Mns   2.54 mph
1,500 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I couldn't find anyone to play with on Saturday so I ended up doing this hike as a one way solo jaunt. I parked my car at the North Tom's thumb Trailhead and utilized Tom's Thumb to the East End Trail to Bell Pass Trail to the Paradise Trail to my buddie's house in McDowell Mountain Ranch. My buddy Paul was to give me a ride back to my car, but more on that later. It was a beautiful day with the temperatures in the low 60's when I pushed off at 10:30. The 900 foot climb up Tom's Thumb is steep and a real quad buster. Thank goodness it was cool out. I got to the intersection of the East End Trai in 30 minutes and began to head down, and do I mean down! This trail is steep and the footing is slick. The views down this boulder strewn canyon are spectacular as is the distant panarama with Fountain Hills in the background. I had to stop to enjoy the views or else risk falling on my butt. I came across several groups huffing and puffing their way up the trail so this South side is as steep, if not steeper than the North side. The 600 foot climb up to Bell Pass was much more gradual. The pass wasn't as close to the summit of McDowell Mountain as I thought it would be so I decided not to head up that route. When I had come up the old McDowell Mountain Trail many years before the Bell Pass Trail was constructed, the old cairned route went more or less directly up the drainage intersecting the ridge just north of the pass. The Bell Pass Trail now winds down the west side of the drainage. From the Pass I called my buddy who informed me that he was out of town until later in the afternoon, but that he had left his back door open and the fridge was full of beer. What are friends for? The hike down was uneventful and many more people were encountered. I headed south on the Paradise Trail and was really expecting this to be a dull and boring walk through the subdivisions. Not so! The trail is very green and goes along the bottom of the wash amongst the trees and I barely noticed the homes up above me. It was like walking through a maze as I had no real points of reference and was relying entirely on my GPS unit to find Paul's house. If I couldn't find his house, plan B had me exiting the drainage at Cafe Portabello for patio beers until Paul got back into town. I took what I thought to be the correct drainage up behind where his house was supposed to be and was pretty sure I was in the right place, but all of these homes look the same from the rear. Especially when all of the homes are behind 8 foot fences and walls. The GPS accuracy of plus or minus 30 feet wasn't adding a great deal of comfort either. I sure didn't want to drop into the wrong backyard and encounter a rottweiler or gun packing pissed off home owner. All of a sudden Cafe Portabello was looking like a more viable option. But it was 1/2 mile away and I was within 50 feet of cold beer.... I climbed over the wall and, fortunately, landed in the right place. The beer was cold, the basketball games were soon on, and I found Paul's stash of cashews. Heaven! All told, this enjoyable trip was 8.25 miles in 3 1/4 hours with about 1,500 feet of AEG.
_____________________
Mar 06 2010
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Barnhardt Trail #43Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 06 2010
Tim
Hiking11.80 Miles 2,400 AEG
Hiking11.80 Miles   5 Hrs   30 Mns   2.15 mph
2,400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Carolyn and I pushed off from the trailhead a little late at 11:00. I had forgotten just how much bang for the buck this hike packs. There was lots of water in Barnhardt Canyon and the temperature was in the mid 50's. This trail provides a really good work out with great views. However, once we passed the last major waterfall and came around the corner at hill #6044 we got to witness the devastating effects of the fire several years ago. I compared this trip's pics to my last hike out here 7 years ago and the difference was night and day. The snow line was down to 6,000 on the north side of the slopes which made for pretty contrast. The last mile of the trail to the intersection of the Mazatzal Divide Trail was very muddy and snow covered in spots which added some challenge. It took a little over 3 hours to reach the end and 2 1/4 hours to get back down with 2,400 feet of AEG. A great day complete with burning quads which made the hot tub much appreciated.
_____________________
Feb 21 2010
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Cornucopia via E. Fork Sycamore CreekPayson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 21 2010
Tim
Hiking6.75 Miles 2,400 AEG
Hiking6.75 Miles   3 Hrs   30 Mns   1.93 mph
2,400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Okay, I missed on the weather forecast on this one. It was supposed to be partly cloudy in the Valley with with temperatures in the mid 60's with no rain until the evening, but that wasn't the case in the Mazatzals. When Carolyn and I pushed off at 10:00 the temperature was 38 degrees and we were in the clouds. The rain, (sleet over 5,000 feet), was off and on all day and mud was our constant companion. We were dressed for it and the elements added something in their own way, but the views were sorely lacking. Water was running everywhere and the creeks were full. As a matter of fact, the full flowing East Fork of Sycamore Creek at the Oneida Mine was responsible for our taking a wrong turn and following an un-named forest service road up the hill to the north. After realizing the error of our ways, (right about when the road ended), we turned around, crossed the creek, and got back on track. Hking a road in these conditions was a bit of a life saver. And given the conditions of this road, I wouldn't want to try it, (FS 201A), in dry weather without a modified 4x4 as it is serioiusly rutted and has some exposure. (FS road 3722 would be simply ridiculous.) This hike had a few steep climbs which really worked the quads. It got a little chilly at the top of the Sycamore Creek divide at 5,400 feet as we were exposed to the wind along with the sleet. The hike down to the West fork of Sycamore Creek was very steep and the creek was really flowing at the bottom. This is where we turned around and came back. It took us just under 2 hours to get to the the West Fork of Sycamore Creek and about 1 1/2 hours to get back. All told, this jaunt came in at 6.75 miles, including our "side trip", in 3 1/2 hours with 2,400 feet of AEG. This hike was fun in its own way, (ie: a really good workout), but would be much better on a clear day.
_____________________
Jan 31 2010
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Dutchman Trail #104Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 31 2010
Tim
Hiking9.50 Miles 1,400 AEG
Hiking9.50 Miles   3 Hrs   30 Mns   2.71 mph
1,400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This is one of my old reliable loop hikes out the Dutchman, over Miners Needle and back on Bluff Springs. It was a beautiful day with temps in the mid 60's. What made this hike particularily fun was all of the water out in the washes. Lots of people were out as Carolyn and I had to park in the lower parking lot for our 10:00 start. We came across quite a few camp sites and accidentally interrupted some ladies bathing at Bluff Springs. (They were in a nicely secluded spot but we were off trail so apologies were offered and accepted. No harm, no foul. Smile.) All told it was 9.5 miles in 3 1/2 hours with 1,400 feet of AEG.
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Jan 09 2010
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Cave Trail #233Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 09 2010
Tim
Hiking5.10 Miles 1,600 AEG
Hiking5.10 Miles   2 Hrs   45 Mns   1.85 mph
1,600 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Carolyn and her coworker, Alona, and I completed this loop hike in beautiful 70 degree temperatures with sunny skies. We didn't get to the trailhead until 11:45. Both the upper and lower parking lots were packed and the Peralta Trail was crowded so it took us an hour and 10 minutes to climb the 1,360 feet to Freemont Saddle. Coming back on the Cave Trail was much nicer as we only came across a half dozen people or so. It's probably been 20 years since I've been down the Cave Trail which is surprising as this trail has such a high effort/reward ratio. It's simply a blast! In the past, I remember always heading along the east side of Geronimo Cave and down the Fortress into Barks Canyon before intersecting the Bluff Springs Trail. I believe that this is the first time that I managed to stay on the correct cairned route along the caves, down the Devils Slide, and around Cathedral Rock. The route is well cairned now but one still has to pay attention. The entire loop came in a 5.1 miles in 2 3/4 hours with roughly 1,600 feet of AEG.
_____________________
Jan 02 2010
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Black Mesa Trail #241Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 02 2010
Tim
Hiking9.20 Miles 1,100 AEG
Hiking9.20 Miles   3 Hrs   15 Mns   2.83 mph
1,100 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Doug, Carolyn and I completed this 9.2 clockwise mile loop with the Dutchman trail in 3 1/4 hours. A beautiful day that shook off some of the New Year's sloth. This is one of my favorite loops as it is close to town and provides great views with minimal time commitment.
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Dec 25 2009
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Tom's Thumb Trail - MSPPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 25 2009
Tim
Hiking7.50 Miles 1,500 AEG
Hiking7.50 Miles   2 Hrs   45 Mns   2.73 mph
1,500 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Paul, Mark, Jim and I pushed off at 10:35 Christmas day on this point-to-point shuttle hike so as to get in some exercise before beginning our holiday sloth. Paul's wife, Katie, was kind enough to shuttle us around to the northern Tom's Thumb Trailhead. It's a narrow dirt road but easily passable for any passenger vehicle. There were a half dozen cars at the trailhead when we got there and the temperature was 46 degrees which made the climb up much more manageable. This is a very well maintained trail but it is steep and provided a good cardio workout. It took us 50 minutes to get to the base of Tom's Thumb and we kicked around there for a bit before heading down to the Gateway Center. The descent was steep too so this trail would provide a good workout from either direction. As we got closer to the Gateway Center the crowds began but that was only for the last 1/2 hour or so. The temperature was 56 degrees when we finished. All told the trip was 7.5 miles in 2 3/4 hours with 1,500 AEG. The north trailhead was at an elevation of 3,760 feet while the Gateway Center is at 2,900 making for an overall 860 foot descent. A good time was had by all.
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Aug 08 2009
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Kinder Crossing Trail #19Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 08 2009
Tim
Hiking1.25 Miles 400 AEG
Hiking1.25 Miles      45 Mns   1.67 mph
400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Several weeks ago I attempted a clockwise loop utilizing the east ends of both the Kinder and Horse Crossing Trails but had to abort because I couldn't find the eastern exit up Horse Crossing. This past weekend I intended to hike down both trails from their trailheads off FSR 137 so that I could determine where these two trails intersected East Clear Creek.

The eastern tailhead for Kinder Crossing is at the end of FSR 137B at N34 34.392 W111 8.729. This is near elevation point 6955 on the Topo map and nowhere near where the Topo map shows the trail going up the east side. (There's a shock.) This Trailhead is well signed and the road is a little rough, but any passenger car could make it as long as it's dry. The trail heads straight down the northern side of the ridgeline with no switchbacks so it is pretty steep. It bottoms out at N34 34.269 W111 08.942. At this location there is a large pile of rocks holding up a 8 ft. tree branch with a large flat "table top" rock leaning against it. The 1/2 mile trail down is a little sparse in spots but there are frequent cairns and even a large rock arrow formation to show you the way. The trail continues east along the creekbed for a few hundred yards ending at N34 34.272 W111 08.726 before it peters out.
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Aug 08 2009
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Horse Crossing Trail #20Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 08 2009
Tim
Hiking1.90 Miles 500 AEG
Hiking1.90 Miles   1 Hour      1.90 mph
500 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Having failed several weeks ago to find the exit up the eastern side of the Horse Crossing Trail, I returned this past weekend with the plan to hike down from the eastern trailhead to determine where exactly this trail intersected East Clear Creek.

The eastern trailhead is located off of FSR 137 at N34 34.814 W111 07.735 and is well signed. This is pretty much where the Topo map shows it to be. The road is in good shape and any passenger vehicle could manage it as long as the road is dry. The trail heads straight down the ridge so it is very steep. The trail is in surprisingly good shape as it is maintained by the Wild Geese Club in memory of somebody. (Sorry, but I can't remember what the commemorative sign along the trail said exactly.) Instead of switching back as shown on the Topo map, the trail continues straight down to the creek bed at N34 34.935 W111 08.140. This is roughly at the "C" in the word "Creek" on the Topo map. Very devious. Several weeks ago we had been searching for this trail almost a 1/2 mile further down stream near where the Topo map shows the Horse Crossing Trail, (incorrectly), coming down from the west. At the bottom of the trail, there is a small rock cairn with a number of yellow ribbons tied in the trees that lead one from the creek bed to the well defined trail heading up the ridge.

Knowing the location of the eastern sections of both the Kinder and Horse Crossing Trails it would be possible to make the 8 mile loop up and around the eastern side. This would involve 2.5 miles of hiking FSR 137, but this road is not well traveled and resembles more of a track than a road and would be a pleasant stroll through the pines.
_____________________
Jul 25 2009
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Yosemite- Tuolumne to Silver Lake, CA 
Yosemite- Tuolumne to Silver Lake, CA
 
Backpack avatar Jul 25 2009
Tim
Backpack28.40 Miles 3,400 AEG
Backpack28.40 Miles   15 Hrs   15 Mns   1.86 mph
3,400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This year's annual backpacking trip took us back to Yosemite's Tuolumne Meadows for a 3 day shuttle hike over to Silver Lake in the Ansel Adams Wilderness. We had 11 in our group this year, (Dennis, Denice, Doug, Alex, Carolyn, Mark, Cheryl, Mike, Jeff, Maliha and myself). Our route took us along the John Muir Trail up the Lyell Fork of the Tuolumne River and over the Donohue Pass. From there we followed the Rush Creek Trail along Waugh, Gem, and Agnew Lakes before descending down to Silver Lake. The entire route came in at 28.4 miles with 3,200 feet AEG. Total hiking time was 15 ? hours. Tuolumne Meadows is at approximately 8,800 feet while Silver Lake is at roughly 7,200 feet making for a net descent of 1,400 feet.

DAY ONE
We spent the night in the backpackers campground after having dinner the night before at the Tuolumne Lodge. The Lodge is roughly 1.5 miles east of the campground and dinner was so good, that we decided to have one last hot breakfast there as well. However, during the night bears made several raids in the campgrounds. Mike lost several packages of chicken and some guy outside of our party had his entire backpack carted off and "disassembled". For some reason Mike didn't think a bear could smell through the unopened package and didn't bother utilizing the bear locker. For this offense he was severely admonished and punished with carrying the bear canister up the pass on day #2. That and he lost his wine ration. (smile) After breakfast it was roughly 9 miles to the base of the switchbacks near Kuna Creek. The trail along this way was relatively flat and followed the river. All along the way there were panoramic views of the river valley surrounded by the mountains. Breaks were spent in the water and enjoying a sunny and unusually warm day. Temps were in the upper 70's.

Several of us reached camp and set up our tents prior to being joined by the rest of our party. (Snooze and you lose the best real estate to call home for the night.) The rest of our troop had been talking to another group of backpackers coming from the opposite direction that had raved about this campsite 700 feet further up the switchbacks at the first bridge. This potentially better campsite is where they wanted us to push to. This would also make day 2 a lot easier by chewing through some of the climb. Thus began the first "Lyell Canyon Caucus". The site where my butt was presently parked had a fire ring, (the other potential site was above the fire line), and decent water access, and it was ours. (My tent was pitched and I wasn't in any hurry to pack it up again. That and the fact that after 10+ miles I wasn't looking forward to another 700 foot climb.) Ultimately, after several debates and votes, we decided to take the "bird in the hand" and stay put rather than risk finding out that the higher site had already been claimed. After traveling 10.5 miles in 4 ? hours, (not including a lunch stop), we set up camp around 3:00 in the afternoon and headed for the creek. It turns out we had excellent creek access. There was a sandy beach with a 6 foot deep swimming hole. However, being at 9,000 feet the water was quite cold as there was still a good deal of snow melt off. We spent the next 2 hours snacking & drinking red wine and cooling off by launching periodic "cannon balls" into the creek. (Poor form was a pre-requisite.) Dinner that night consisted of chicken curry and rice along with ample quantities of red wine. A flat first day hike made for heavier packs full of "necessities". Dinner was followed by more cocktails and word games around the camp fire until late that night. Things were not looking good for day 2 but when in Rome....... (smile)

DAY TWO
We pushed of at approximately 8:45 to begin our 2,000 foot climb up to the Donohue Pass. This was quite the grind. (The prior night's wine fest probably didn't help any.) It took us an hour to get to the first bridge and the alternative camp site and it was a 700 foot climb. It was a very picturesque area but we all agreed that even had it been available the night before, we had made the right call by staying with our first camp site. We pumped some more water here and continued. Eventually this climb took us above the tree line. There were numerous stream crossings, some of which were quite precarious and resulted in some wet feet. After 3 hours, we stopped for lunch at one of the stream crossings that more resembled a small pond due to the topography. At this point, while we were only 500 feet from the pass, we were surrounded by mountains and it was like being in a crater. After lunch, it took us about another hour to get to the pass. Along the way we were able to look down into the valley/canyon we had camped in the night before and it was quite impressive. All told, it took us 4 hours to climb the 4 miles and 2,000 feet to the pass. I was beat. The area resembled a moonscape. There was a small lake at the pass which would have been a viable source of water had we needed it. We continued down the other side meeting quite a few groups along the way. (This is a very popular part of the John Muir and Pacific Crest Trails so backpackers were quite abundant.)

Our objective for camp 2 was Waugh Lake. However, along the way we heard from other backpackers that the lake had been drained for dam repairs. Knowing this, we decided to camp along Rush Creek so as to have water access and avoid a mosquito nightmare. We ended up camping near the intersection of the Marie Lakes and John Muir Trails at 10,000 feet which was right at the fire line in the Ansel Adams Wilderness. Day 2 came in at 7.0 miles in 5 1/2 hours, not including lunch, with 2,100 feet of AEG. I hadn't eaten enough throughout the day so I was feeling a little "punky" until I got some dinner in me. Night two was Italian night and we had tortellini and some other pasta with a couple of meat sauce options that were really delicious. Mark and Carolyn did a bang up job on the dinner detail once again. I was once again relegated to the dish washing detail. We had a small campfire but went to bed early due to fatigue and a pesky mosquito population on this side of the pass. In the middle of the night I woke up remembering that I had forgotten a packet of beef jerky in my backpack. Rather than take my chances on bringing a bear into camp and losing my backpack, I got up and pitched it about 40 feet from camp. In retrospect, I probably should have placed the jerky into a bear canister, but I was too lazy to stumble across camp and find a quarter to open and close the darn thing.

DAY THREE
I woke up at first light around 5:30 to a series of flashes. Somebody was apparently taking pictures. When I stuck my head out of the tent Jeff was lining his camera up on something on the nearby rocky slope. Jeff then informed be that our camp was surrounded by 3 or 4 bears. Cool! The last one was scampering up over a rise to my left so I never saw any of them but he claimed that 3 of the bears were small and 1 was very large. Jeff only managed to get a picture of one of the small ones. After policing the area, we determined that the bears never came into our camp, but they did find the jerky that I had tossed out. The question is whether the jerky brought them calling, or whether they would have come calling anyway and my tossing the jerky kept them out of camp. (Our bear canisters were on the edge of camp by the fire pit and were unmolested as well.) I prefer to think the latter, but I probably should have utilized the bear canisters for the purpose they were intended. (smile) After breakfast we set off at 8:15 knowing that we probably had an extra hour ahead of us on day 3 since we had stopped short on day 2. However, we really expected it to be an easy day as it was supposed to be all down hill and only 9+ miles or so. Whoops! As soon as we got onto the Rush Creek Trail heading around the north side of Waugh Lake, the trail began a series of short but steep climbs and descents. No big deal, just not the lay-up we were expecting. It was also quite a bit warmer this day with the temperatures finishing in the mid 80's when we exited at the lower elevation Silver Lake. Waugh Lake was dry which looked kind of eerie in the middle of a green forest.

After 3 hours we stopped for lunch on a finger jutting into the north side of Gem Lake and took a well deserved swim. The water was much warmer here and we filled up our water containers for the final push out. The trail climbed up and down a few more times before reaching the saddle, 45 minutes later, that looked down over Agnew Lake. What a pretty sight this was as one could clearly make out the trail heading steeply down the north side of the gorge to the Agnew Dam. At this point, the elevation was 9,100 feet and the remaining 3 miles of trail was all down hill with steep switchbacks to Silver Lake at 7,200 feet. This final descent was steep and hard on the toes, but a relief from all of the previous up and downs. This last leg took a little less than 90 minutes to get to the bottom. The rail crossed over the tram line a couple of times and was quite scree filled in spots. The trail was also very exposed to the sun in this section so even though we were going down hill, it was hot work. Day 3 came in at 10.9 miles which was longer than expected and took 5 ? hours with approximately 600 feet of AEG with a gross descent of 3,400 with a net decline of 2,800.

With that we piled into the 2 Expeditions and headed back to Reno. (Of course we stopped along the way for some cold beverages.) One Expedition circled back to Tuolumne Meadows to pick up the 3rd vehicle before returning to Reno. The only mistake we made was that we forgot all about 2 of the bear canisters in the Reno bound Expedition so I had to mail those back after returning to Phoenix which was no big deal. All in all, another excellent Yosemite adventure with great friends.
_____________________
1 archive
Jul 18 2009
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Kinder Crossing Trail #19Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 18 2009
Tim
Hiking6.50 Miles 700 AEG
Hiking6.50 Miles   3 Hrs   45 Mns   1.73 mph
700 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
My buddy Jim and I headed up to Kinder Crossing with his son, Alex, and his son's buddy, Karl, for a little hiking and car camping so as to get out of the Valley's heat. Our intent was to do a clockwise loop down the Kinder Crossing Trail and then follow East Clear Creek downstream to the Horse Crossing Trail. From there we were going to head up the East side on the Horse Crossing Trail and then take Forest Service Road #137 down to the East side of the Kinder Crossing trail so as to complete the loop. The temperature was in the mid 80's when we pushed off at 10:45 and there were a few groups of people on the trail and down at the first swimming hole. Once we started heading north downstream we had the place to ourselves. We changed into sandals and/or water shoes as we were going to be feet wet most of the way. What a fun hike! Periodically there were decent game trails to follow along the sides of the creek but we often just slogged downstream through the knee deep water. Lots of craw fish. Along the way, I kept a sharp eye out for the trail heading up and out the East side but never saw it. (I've read that the trail is about 3/4 of a mile down stream and goes up along that spine just to the right of the word "East" on the topo map, but who knows. I've driven along the top of the East side and found the trailhead marker to be at the end of the FSR at the top of the same spine which is nowhere near where the topon map shows the trail to be. Go figure- smile.)

We arrived at the Horse Crossing Trail in just over 2 hours. We found the trail going up the west side but it was in a different place than appears on the topo map. (Is there a trend here?) The bottom of the trail was at a camping area with a large fire ring. This trail goes up the South spine of the drainage whereas the topo map shows the trail going up the North spine. We spent some time exploring along the East side of the creek in search of the trail going up to the top of the East side but had no luck finding it. I've got a good idea where the trail should be but it looked to be a bit more of a bushwhack than we were up for. Again, I've been up along the FSR on the top of the East side and the trailhead is where the topo map depicts it to be. We just couldn't find the starting point on the bottom. I'll have to come back another time and take both trails down from the top of the East side as I'm really curious where they intersect the creek. We ended up hiking up the West side of the Horse Crossing Trail with the intent of walking the road back to Kinder. Along the way we came across some ATV-ers and paid them $20 to take our driver back to our car. While it seemed like a good idea at the time, this was a waste of money as it probably only saved us 45 minutes of walking. I had the whole hike at roughly 6.5 miles in 2 3/4 hours with 700 feet of AEG. 600 of that was climbing up the Horse Crossing Trail which has a much more friendly grade than the Kinder Crossing Trail.
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Jul 11 2009
Tim
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 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Dane Canyon LoopPayson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 11 2009
Tim
Hiking7.00 Miles 800 AEG
Hiking7.00 Miles   3 Hrs      2.33 mph
800 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
In an effort to get out of the Valley's heat, Carolyn and I headed up to the Rim Saturday morning. We must have missed the FSR that heads down to Dana Cabin itself as we parked in a clearing area almost due east of the entry point into Dana Canyon. No big deal though. We pushed of at noon with the temperatures in the lower 80's and just headed west down the slope until we eventually crossed the U-Bar Trail. We then took it north a 100 yards or so until we could find a good spot to begin our decent into Dana Canyon. We had to make a few switchbacks to safely descend the 300 feet to the canyon floor but it wasn't difficult. What a pretty canyon and loop hike! The game trail was easy to follow and the frequent creek crossings were extremely manageable and we were able to stay feet dry. This hike is a lot like going down the Houston Brothers Trail. As we neared where our exit point was supposed to be that would take us up to the jeep road, I noticed a break in the trees. We headed up this gap and came across the carin marking the route. There's really no trail here so we just climbed the route of least reistance. It was only a 150 foot climb out of the canyon but it was steep. The fomer jeep road took us down to the Barbershop Trail which was well cairned. After the trail turned east, we jumped a lone elk that was crashing through the trees. We missed one of the turns on the Barbershop trail and had to double back as we stayed on the road too long. One has to pay attention on these trails that follow and cross all of these FSRs. The U-Bar trail back to Dana Cabin was a very nice downhill walk through the woods. At the Cabin, we left the U-Bar Trail and headed northeast up the road before short-cutting north to our car. We had the entire loop at 7 miles in 3 hours with 800 feet of AEG. We were late getting to the Rock Crossing Camp Ground and it was full. Since we had plenty of water, we just found an unoccupied fire ring in the woods off of FSR 722B (?) that made for an awesome camp site.
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average hiking speed 2.27 mph
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