username
X
password
register
for free!
help
GuidesRoutes
 
Photosets
 
 Comments
triplogs   photosets   labels comments more
Previous  1 ... 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22  Next
432 triplogs
Jan 07 2007
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Black Mesa Loop - Superstition MtnsPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 07 2007
Tim
Hiking9.30 Miles 1,125 AEG
Hiking9.30 Miles   3 Hrs   30 Mns   2.66 mph
1,125 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Carolyn and I pushed off from the trailhead at 9:30 this past Sunday morning with clear skies, a stiff breeze, and temperatures in the low 50's. A great day for a quick hike before the NFL playoff games. We did this loop in a clockwise fashion going out on the Black Mesa Trail and coming back on the Dutchman. We checked out a copple of "secondary" trails along the way for future loop hikes. Just below Yellow Peak there is a unmarked turnoff, (a row of rocks is across the "turnoff"), heading north up to Second Water. Initially, this trail doubles back a bit but was in pretty good shape as it heads up the west side of the northbound wash. It would be easier to find this subtle turnoff if one were hiking East to West on the Black Mesa Trail. Just West of the intersection of the Black Mesa Trail and the Dutchman is another secondary trail heading south down to West Boulder Canyon. I'm sure that at some point that route would turn into a bushwhack. At Parker Pass we checked out the cairned south turnoff heading to O'Grady Canyon and this didn't look too bad either. We also went up First Water Creek a little ways but this looked to be a thorny bushwhack. Either one of these last three would enable a nice loop hike back to the Massacre Grounds. All told, about 9.3 miles in 3 1/2 hours and the temperature was in the low 60's when we got back to the First Water Trailhead.
_____________________
Dec 09 2006
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Massacre FallsPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 09 2006
Tim
Hiking4.10 Miles 1,102 AEG
Hiking4.10 Miles   2 Hrs   15 Mns   1.82 mph
1,102 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I didn't have much time so this trail was a nice way to spend a couple of hours on a beautiful Saturday afternnon. This trail presents a lot of rewards, (ie: views, varied terrain, solitude), for being so close to the Valley. It's an easy to follow trail with about a 900 foot elevation gain over the 1.8 miles to the falls. It took about an hour to get there including a short side trip to the top of the "bench" overlooking the Massacre Grounds. On the way back, I did some exploring east of the trail in search of cairns that may mark the way to First Water Creek so as to complete a loop. I had no luck, (just as well as I had no time), finding any cairns so it just must be an unchartered cross county adventure for another day.
_____________________
Dec 02 2006
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Dacite Super LoopPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 02 2006
Tim
Hiking6.50 Miles 2,395 AEG
Hiking6.50 Miles   3 Hrs   15 Mns   2.00 mph
2,395 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Paul, Dan and I did this hike on a beautiful Sturday afternoon. We got a late start as we'd been out way too late at the casino the night/morning before. So slightly hungover we headed up to West Boulder Saddle at 11:00 in the morning. The road to Carney Springs is now blocked by the Forest Service so you have to hoof it up to the break in the fence line. I was sucking wind and birnging up the rear when I arrived at the top an hour and 15 minutes into the hike. The trail across to Fremont saddle was well cairned and easy to follow. It took us an hour to make this traverse. We had to do a little bush whacking just before we dropped down into the chute that deposits you on Fremont Saddle. An older gentleman watching us from down below at the saddle claimed that we must have missed a cairn as we came down the wrong face to the chute but it seemed okay to me. We elected to come back down Peralta trail rather than taking the traditional Cave Trail. It was a total of 5.1 miles from to the Peralta Trailhead and another 1.4 mile walk down the road back to our car. We finished this loop in just under 3.25 hours.
_____________________
Nov 25 2006
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Camelback Summit - Echo Canyon THPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 25 2006
Tim
Hiking2.60 Miles 1,300 AEG
Hiking2.60 Miles   1 Hour   26 Mns   1.81 mph
1,300 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
It was a beautiful sunny day last Saturday and I thought there wasn't a better way of breaking in a new pair of hiking boots. It's been quite a few years since I've been up on Camelback and I'd forgotten about the crowds it can attract. I went up the Echo Canyon side, (46 minutes), and my knees felt it. I came down the Cholla Trail side to the east, (40 minutes), after stopping on top for quite a while to enjoy the views and read a book.
_____________________
Oct 28 2006
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Dutchman Trail #104Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 28 2006
Tim
Hiking9.00 Miles 1,400 AEG
Hiking9.00 Miles   3 Hrs   30 Mns   2.57 mph
1,400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This solo hike originated at the Peralta Trailhead and was a clockwise loop starting off on the Bluff Springs Trail before coming back around Miner's Needle on the Dutchman Trail. I've done this hike before in a counter clockwise direction but prefer this clockwise direction as it puts "Cardiac Hill" at the very beginning of the hike when the temperatures are at their coolest. I started off at 7:45 with a temperature of 68 degrees. (There were fewer than a dozen cars in the parking lot when I arrived.) Heading up Barks Canyon I came across two slower moving gentlemen that were hiking without a map and thinking about looping around Miner's Needle or Weaver's Needle. They couldn't decide. As the Weaver's Needle loop, (on trail without bushwhacking at the cross cut), via the Terrapin Trail is a 12.9 mile loop, I advised they take the shorter Miner's loop before moving on. In this area of Barks Canyon it is easy to lose the trail as it crosses the wash numerous times and there are lots of "side" trails. As I climbed up the small hill just before the Terrapin/Bluff Springs intersection, I looked back down the trail and saw those same two gentlemen erroneously heading up the wash pass the turnoff. (It's pretty easy to miss as the turnoff up and out of the wash isn't well cairned.) If that's how they planned to make their loop they were going to be in for a long day as Upper Barks is no picnic- especially without a map! I didn't see them on TV that night so no news is good news I guess.

The trail from the Terrapin intersection, (the 1 hour point), to the Dutchman's intersection along the wash is not difficult to follow although it is overgrown in spots with cat claw. I reached Miners Summit at the 2 hour point and was back at the trailhead having completed the 9.0 mile loop in 3.5 hours with only a few short stops to "chat" with other folks. The temperature at the end was a warm 82 degrees but only really noticable during the last hour coming across the basin. It was 11:15 at this point and the upper lot was almost full with over 3 dozen vehicles.
_____________________
Oct 14 2006
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Reavis Ranch via 109 SouthGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Oct 14 2006
Tim
Backpack12.50 Miles 2,000 AEG
Backpack12.50 Miles   7 Hrs      1.79 mph
2,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
My buddy Jim, his 14 year old son, Alex, and myself headed out for an overnight camping trip to Reavis Ranch on Saturday October 14th. As the planned hike in was a short distance, we were in no real hurry and didn't leave the valley until after 9:00 in the morning. The forest service road to the trailhead was in decent shape although rutted in spots but nothing that any high clearance vehicle couldn't negotiate. A passenger car could make it as far as Woodbury Trailhead still. We got to the trailhead in under 2 hours and pushed off for the ranch at 11:00.

The weather had been threatening all morning and we had rain gear and were expecting to have to use it. However, the "dark" clouds were passing around us and heading north to the high country. Aside from a short sprinkle after we reached the ranch there was no rain at all which was really surprising. Alex was in the lead all day and came across a bull snake on the side of the trail which gave a momentary "thrill". There were quite a few trees down across the trail and it was overgrown with knee high grass up in the meadow which made it challenging to follow at times, but nothing too difficult.

We traversed the 6.25 miles to the ranch in a leisurely 3 ½ hours. There were a lot of apples in the orchid and we were treated to an apple eating doe right next to our camp site Sunday morning. Those deer must be very domesticated and used to people in the Ranch area because I was able to get within 15 feet of this one and say "cheese".

After an excellent dinner with lots of red wine and a roaring campfire, the overnight temperature was in the upper 40's or lower 50's and very pleasant with no wind or rain. There was water in the creek, but it wasn't flowing like it does in the spring. Just a series of pools but they were adequate to provide ample water. The trip out began promptly at 8:00 and was accompanied by clear & sunny skies and took the same 3 ½ hours to return to the car.
_____________________
1 archive
Jul 15 2006
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Yosemite 2006 Hike, CA 
Yosemite 2006 Hike, CA
 
Backpack avatar Jul 15 2006
Tim
Backpack27.00 Miles 4,100 AEG
Backpack27.00 Miles   16 Hrs      1.69 mph
4,100 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
3 day backpacking trip in Yosemite.
_____________________
1 archive
Feb 25 2006
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Reavis Ranch via 109 NorthGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Feb 25 2006
Tim
Backpack20.60 Miles 2,040 AEG
Backpack20.60 Miles   7 Hrs   45 Mns   2.66 mph
2,040 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Having nothing special planned for the weekend, I made a spur of the moment decision to head out to Reavis Ranch for an overnighter. This would be a solo jaunt as I just started stuffing the backpack Friday night. I was a little concerned about the overnight temperatures as some folks had reported them to be in the teens the prior week which makes getting up in the morning a little rough.

It was about an hour and 40 minutes to the Reavis Trailhead from South Scottsdale. I pushed off just before 10:00 in the morning with perfect conditions. Clear sunny skies, 58 degrees, no wind and 43 pounds on my back due to some extra clothing. I just wore a t-shirt and was very comfortable all day. It was 1 ¼ hours to the Reavis Falls turnoff and roughly 2 ¼ hours to the trail's high point at the saddle between Castle Dome and Windy Pass. The views looking East out over Two Bar Ridge were stunning. I was surprised at the good time I was making on this 1,400 foot ascent. Unlike the Southern route or the Reavis Gap route, this Northern Route's ascent, (although longer and higher), is much more gradual and on a much "cleaner" trail that is void of all of the scree one would find on the Reavis Gap Trail. Instead of Juniper forests, one is treated to panoramic views in every direction.

At the Plow Saddle junction, (2 ¾ hour mark), I headed south to check out Plow Saddle Springs which is at the junction with the Frog Tanks Trail This little side trip was just under a mile and only took a ½ hour. It was a steep 400 feet down to a very dry cement trough. On the way down, I could hear something "heavy" across from me on the other side of the drainage in the thick trees and brush, but could never get a visual on it. "It" was breaking a lot of branches and snorting like a horse so I suppose it was a deer or two. I was hoping to get a glimpse of a bear, but this wasn't the terrain for that- I don't believe. After returning to the upper intersection the trail climbs up and around a tall hill overlooking the Frog Tanks Trail down below. I was pretty fatigued at this point and had to be careful with my footing as the downhill section from this hill to the intersection of the Frog Tanks Trail and beyond to the North end of the Reavis Valley has lots of loose rock on it. I arrived at my campsite just south of Reavis Ranch at 2:30 and was thoroughly beat. The entire trip, (including the ½ hour side trip to Plow Saddle Springs), was 10.8 miles in 4 ½ hours. While I was very tired, (okay, I haven't been running as much as I should- smile), I still think this route is much easier than the Reavis Gap route.

It was 75 degrees as I set up camp and finished a book before starting dinner. During this time, 3 different groups of campers passed by. Once the sun set, the temperature started to drop rapidly. By the time I hit the hay at around 9:00, it was quite cool. I could see my breath and condensation was forming on the inside of the tent. However, I don't think it got much below freezing, if at all. When I woke up at 3:00 in the morning to check out the stars, (stars are simply way to bright out at the Ranch), it actually felt as if it had warmed up somewhat. The 6:30 temperature was in the low 40's and by the time I pushed off at 8:00 am, the temperature was in the lower 50's. I wore 2 t-shirts on the way out and was again quite comfortable. I spooked two groups of white tail deer just north of the apple orchid, but other than that, the trip back was uneventful but much quicker and less strenuous. I shared some water with 3 campers and a dog that had spent the night at the Plow Saddle intersection/campsite and saw another solo day hiker, but that was it. When I got to the trailhead at 11:30, the temperature was 65 degrees. Per the GPS, It took 3 ¼ hours to travel the 9.8 miles back to the trailhead. All told, the GPS unit had the adventure at 20.6 miles in 7 ¾ hours.
_____________________
Jan 30 2006
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Dutchman Trail #104Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 30 2006
Tim
Hiking14.00 Miles 2,000 AEG
Hiking14.00 Miles   5 Hrs   30 Mns   2.55 mph
2,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Carolyn and took this little jaunt on Sunday January 29th. We started from First Water Trailhead a little after 8:00 in the morning. It was a clear sunny day with no wind and temperatures in the lower 50s which quickly warmed up to an early afternoon high of 65. We took this trail as a clockwise loop around Black Top Mesa going out to the Cavalry Trail intersection and back. We got to the top of Bull Pass in just under 2 hours. We stopped for lunch at the Terrapin Trail intersection which was about the 3 hour mark. On the way back through Boulder Canyon we came across two gentlemen who, while not lost, were a little confused as to where they were at and how to "loop" back to the First Water Trailhead. They didn't have a map and were going from memory. We gave them our map which seemed to put them more at ease. We got back to the trailhead right at 2:00. We saw quite a few folks and horses between the trailhead and Bull Pass Trail but had the place to ourselves for the loop around Black Top mesa. All told, the GPS unit had the trip at 14 miles in 5 1/2 hours, not including a 30 minute break for lunch.
_____________________
Dec 26 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Bull Basin Loop - Eastern SuperstitionsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 26 2005
Tim
Hiking9.90 Miles 1,962 AEG
Hiking9.90 Miles   5 Hrs      1.98 mph
1,962 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I did this fantastic loop as a solo hike on Monday December 26th. I'd always wanted to do this loop but after reading past trail descriptions from others had decided against it due to the immense amount of cat claw and overgrown vegetation on the Bull Basin trail. A recent update by Kanode persuaded me to give it a shot as the trail had been cleared out in December of 2004.

I started off this loop in a counter clockwise direction, (the only way to do this route as far as I'm concerned), at 7:50 in the morning just after day break. Given the recent warm temperatures in the Valley, (upper 70's over the Christmas weekend), I was expecting morning temperatures in lower 40's and dressed accordingly. Mistake! It was 29 degrees when I started and I was quite chilly. Fortunately, there was no wind to make matters any worse. After 20 minutes, the trail starts its 1,200 foot ascent up to Bull Basin and the temperature was no longer an issue. I stripped off the fleece and wore a T-shirt the rest of the way. The trail was very clear and easy to follow. It appears that it has received a lot of recent horse traffic up to the saddle. There was one false trail early on, (take the right fork), but it petered out shortly and this error only took 5 to 10 minutes or so. It took me an hour to reach the corral at Bull Basin which is approximately the 2 mile mark and at 4,600+ feet. Just before the corral, there is a cairned side trail that leads to an interesting wooden trough with several stone walls.

From the corral to the saddle is another 500 feet in elevation, but it's a steep and rocky section as it goes straight up a drainage. Again, route finding was not an issue. At the saddle, (5,100 feet and 1,700 feet above the Miles Trailhead), there is a gate to pass through. I was surprised to get cell phone reception at this point. This was roughly at the 4 mile point of the hike and took me just under two hours.

Heading down from the saddle for its 1,200 foot descent the trail remains easy to follow although it is steep and scree covered. This was a pleasant surprise as I was expecting it to be severely overgrown. At about the 4,600 elevation level, the overgrowth appeared and the trail became more difficult to see. However, as others have stated, once I pushed through the brush, the trail continued on the other side. The brush is mostly manzanita so it didn't scratch me and actually helped with my footing as it arrested my descent through this steep section. This thick cover would make this section very challenging if one were attempting this loop in a clockwise direction and going uphill through this mess. In this section I passed through a second barbed wire gate and by an old steel trough. At about the 4,300 foot level, (ie: halfway down the drainage to the Haunted Canyon trail intersection), cat claw begins to appear as the trail crosses the wash numerous times. It wasn't bad however, (I was wearing long pants), and I only recorded one significant scratch. While the trail was more difficult to follow, (it didn't help that the rising sun was directly in my line of sight), at no time did I lose it. It took me an hour to get from the saddle to the trail intersection.

The Bull Basin and Haunted Canyon trail intersection is at 3,900 feet. This makes for a 1,100 foot ascent to the next saddle at the top of the Paradise Trail. However, the Haunted Canyon trail is well maintained and provides very good footing which helps mitigate the work required. After I passed through the gate at the beginning of the Paradise trail, the route wound around the summit to the saddle at roughly 5,000 feet. This climb took just under an hour as I was starting to get tired. (I think I over did the egg nog and brandy thing over the holidays which didn't help any.) From here I began the 1,600 foot descent to the road. The first ½ mile of this trail is steep and scree filled so I was really glad to have my hiking poles. Once I got into the trees, (the green area on the topo map), the tail leveled out some and provided much better footing. There were several wash crossing, but for the most part it remained a pleasant walk through the woods all the way to the road.

All told, my GPS unit had the hike at 9.9 miles at it took 5 hours with a short 15 minute break for a snack and some blister care. Oh, the temperature was 67 degrees when I finished at 1:00 so it eventually did warm up significantly.
_____________________
Dec 03 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Coffee Flat Trail #108Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 03 2005
Tim
Hiking10.50 Miles 1,400 AEG
Hiking10.50 Miles   5 Hrs      2.10 mph
1,400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Carolyn and I took this out and back trip from Woodbury Trailhead on Saturday, December 3rd. The original plan was to take the Coffee Flat Trail to Dripping Springs and then head north on the Red Tanks Trail up to the Red Tanks Divide. Unfortunately, the going through the sandy washes was a little slower than anticipated and I had a commitment back in Phoenix so we had to turn around just halfway up to the Divide. It was a beautiful, sunny day with temperatures in the upper 40s when we started and mid 60s when we finished. It took us just under 90 minutes to get to the trailhead from south Scottsdale at the roads were all in good shape. We parked right by the gate at the Woodbury Trailhead turn off and headed off down the dirt road to the JF Ranch right at 8:30.

The first 15 minutes down the dirt road to the ranch is no thrill, and even less so walking up hill on the return trip. There was very little water in Fraser Canyon and the wash was very sandy. We got to the Whetrock Canyon entrance in an hour and ventured up its entrance a little ways. When we had been here a year ago, this entrance was impassable as its narrow length was filled with water which wasn't the case this day. We got to Dripping Springs in an hour and a half, and continued north up the wash. The Red Tanks trail is very similar to the Boulder Canyon Trail on this section as one is rock hopping and taking the path of least resistance. This wash was dry and sandy too. One has to keep an eye out for cairns as the trail occasionally pops out of the wash and travels along its side on much more solid ground. There's no getting lost as all paths eventually lead back into the wash. However, if you're not watching for the cairns marking the turnoff up Red Tanks Canyon, it would be really easy to just keep boulder hopping up Randolph Canyon. Once we headed out of the wash and up Red Tanks Canyon, the trail changed and became much more overgrown. There was quite a bit of cat claw obscuring this little used trail. We never lost the trail, but we did get scratched up a bit. I would strongly advise against attempting this trail in shorts. The trail climbs up along the west side of the canyon. The wash down below was very green as it snaked its way north. We turned around at the 2.5 hour mark which had us halfway up to the divide, (halfway between "tanks" and "canyon" on the topo map). This point was 1 hour out from Dripping Springs. All told, the GPS had the trip at 10.5 miles in 5 hours, not including a 20 minute stop for lunch at Dripping Springs on the return. All in all, a gorgeous day.
_____________________
Nov 05 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Weaver's Needle CrosscutPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 05 2005
Tim
Hiking8.90 Miles 2,200 AEG
Hiking8.90 Miles   4 Hrs   45 Mns   1.87 mph
2,200 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Carolyn and I used this trail as part of a larger loop with the Bluff Springs, Terrapin, and Peralta Trails. We took off on this loop just after 8:00 on a bright and sunny Saturday morning. We were heading up Bluff Springs Trail in a counter clockwise direction. It was a cool 60 degrees when we started which is good as going straight from the car to Cardiac Hill is tough enough without having to deal with temperatures. The Bluff Spring Trail was quite eroded from last springs rains, especially around the upper wash crossings in Barks Canyon. We were mindlessly trekking up the wash and missed the trail crossing heading up and over the ridge to the Terrapin Trail intersection. I knew where the Bluff Springs Trail was supposed to be and even momentarily saw another hiker up on it, but couldn't find the designated trail coming out of the wash. Silly and very frustrating. Just as we were getting ready to bushwhack up the ridge to where I knew the trail to be, we literally stumbled across it and were back on our way having spent 25 minutes putzing around.

We reached the intersection of the Terrapin Trail and Weavers Crosscut in a little under two hours. The turn off for Weavers Crosscut is clearly marked by a large cairn and we were armed with Joe's GPS route so we took off cross country with an "adequate" degree of confidence. (smile) The trail itself is a minor bushwhack from cairn to cairn and it is well marked. We lost the route for a short time just before the saddle, (I call it a saddle but it's the same "ravine" that Fritzski referred to in his trail description), but quickly got back on it as all paths lead to this clearly defined saddle. The cat claw wasn't too bad. Coming down the west side involves a lot more boulder scrambling, but again the route is well cairned and there really is only one way to go. The cairns were a little sparse crossing the wash and up to Peralta Trail, but even if one didn't see or utilize the cairns, it would be nearly impossible to miss running into this well defined trail. The crosscut itself took us just under an hour to negotiate. At its intersection with the Peralta Trail, we came across two ladies heading north who were training for their first Grand Canyon hike. We chatted with them for a quite a while before heading up to Freemont Saddle and back to the trailhead. All told, we had the trip at 8.9 miles per the GPS in 4 ¾ hours. We probably added a ½ mile and 30 minutes screwing around in Barks Canyon, but what the heck. It was a gorgeous day and only 80 degrees when we finished just before 1:00 in the afternoon.
_____________________
Oct 30 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Black Mesa Loop - Superstition MtnsPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 30 2005
Tim
Hiking9.70 Miles 1,125 AEG
Hiking9.70 Miles   3 Hrs   15 Mns   2.98 mph
1,125 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Seeing that we had experienced time zone changes this past weekend and the NFL games were moved back an hour, I headed out Sunday morning to get a quick hike in before the afternoon's games started. (That and the fact we were stuck with only the Cardinals game in the morning made this pretty much a no brainer.) I pushed off from the trailhead at 8:30 with temperatures in the upper 60's. I headed out to Black Mesa attending to do a clockwise loop so as to maximize the views. It was a beautiful day and, surprisingly, not many folks were out. There were only a dozen cars at the trailhead. On the way back, just east of Parker Pass, I came across 3 ladies on horses. I should have known something was up when the lead rider, (while 20 yards away), referred to me as a "Horse Eating Human" after my customary "Good Morning!". Apparently her horse has "people problems" and she really had to rein it in and slap its flanks in order to get it up the hill and past me. (Realizing she had a "situation", I had stepped off the trail an additional 20 feet or so and remained still and quiet.) This "beast" was rearing up and pitching a serious fit! Knowing her horse had these "issues", why she picked the Dutchman Trail of all places is beyond me.

On the return trip, I explored a little ways up West Boulder Canyon before it got to "brushy". Perhaps another day when it's cooler and I have long pants. All told, the hike came in at 9.7 miles, (per the GPS), and took 3 ¼ hours. It was 80 degrees when I finished just before noon and I had used a good 2 liters of water.
_____________________
Jul 18 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Blue Lookout Trail #71Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 18 2005
Tim
Hiking2.90 Miles 2,546 AEG
Hiking2.90 Miles   1 Hour   15 Mns   2.32 mph
2,546 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This was a quick little jaunt as part of a "beat the heat" weekend in Alpine. First off, I found the Forest Service Road, (#84), to be closer to 4.4 miles to the trailhead and not the 6.5 miles advertised. While this road is not nicely graded like most of the other Forest Service roads in the area, any passenger vehicle could manage it. Clearly, this road served as the fire break during the KP Fire in May of 2004 as evidenced by all of the burn out on your left as you drive in. The trees on the right are virtually untouched. The trail heads east from the parking lot and has a lot of trees fallen across it. At about the 1.1 mile mark, (the trail is literally due north of the lookout tower at this point),the trail comes across several fallen trees and appears to end. 10 yards back is a sharp switchback that heads back due south up the slope to the tower. Just before the the summit is the junction with McKittrick Trail which turn off to the the left at a 90 degree angle. As one approaches the summit, there are fallen trees all across the trail and no easy or correct way to get around them. I bush whacked to the left on the way up and bush whacked to the left, (that would be the other way), on the way down and found them both to be equally as bad. The tower itself is in pretty poor shape and the stairs are somewhat suspect, but the views are very good.
_____________________
Jun 11 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Soldier Pass Trail #66 - SedonaSedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 11 2005
Tim
Hiking3.80 Miles 480 AEG
Hiking3.80 Miles   1 Hour   45 Mns   2.17 mph
480 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Seven of us, (Doug, Diana, Brad, Diana, Dan, Naomi, and myself), headed out for Soldiers Pass from the western end of the Brins Mesa Trail. This is the first time Dan had ever been out hiking in the wilderness without a gun. (smile) We got a later than normal start at 10:30 but the day was slightly overcast with temperatures in the upper 70s. This was a short 3.8 mile point-to point hike that packed in a lot of views, especially as one came down Soldier Pass. On the way down, we were treated to usual stunning views of Sedona along with Seven Pools and the Devil's Sinkhole. The car shuttle was around 8 miles and took approximately 15 to 20 minutes to drive so this was a real convenient point-to-point hike.
_____________________
May 19 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Buckskin Gulch - Wire Pass to Paria RiverSouthwest, AZ
Southwest, AZ
Backpack avatar May 19 2005
Tim
Backpack44.00 Miles
Backpack44.00 Miles   24 Hrs   60 Mns   1.76 mph
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Okay, now I know what all of the fuss is about. When we started planning this hike 5 months ago, I was slightly skeptical that it would meet expectations. Boy was I wrong. This is one tremendous adventure and rest assured, everything that you've ever heard is true. We spent the night at the Marble Canyon Lodge, (1-800-726-1789), which is about 4 hours from North Phoenix. Our group of 7 trekkers, (Tim, Carolyn, Doug, Craig, Rob, Mike, and Dennis), had our shuttle drivers, (Betty Price @ 928-355-2252 and Susan from Paria Outpost 928-691-1047), picked us up at Lee's Ferry at 6:00 am. Thursday morning May 19th for the 2 hour round trip to the Wire Pass entrance to the Buckskin Gulch. (The trip can be done in 90 minutes but we had to stop for coffee.) We had to use two vehicles so the shuttle cost was $220 plus tip. Betty is a wealth of information and local lore who kept us entertained for the entire drive up. We had previously contacted the Kanab Ranger Station, (ph# 435-644-4600), and had a 7 day forecast of clear skies, warmer temperatures in the upper 80's with the Paria River flowing at slightly less than 50 cfs, (which is reported to be knee deep but ankle to calf was more common). The weather can be a real balancing act as you want warmer & dryer conditions so as to get through the Buckskin, but not such high temperatures that one gets over heated on the last day coming out.

Day 1
After Betty dropped us off, we hit the trail at 8:30 am. Our game plan was to do the entire 44 mile hike to Lees Ferry in 3 days. However, we were permitted for 4 days which would allow us to make adjustments for trail conditions and attitudes. (smile) We knew the 1st day would be the toughest as we had to hike at least 16 miles from Wire Pass past the confluence to Wall Spring in order to obtain fresh water. Soon after heading down the wash we were welcomed to the beginning of the slot canyons that were to be our home for the next 9 ½ hours. Once we entered the slots, the whole experience resembled spelunking more than hiking. With the exception of some 3 foot choke points, the norm is to have steep and smooth walls just 6 to 10 feet across with a ceiling height of 100 to 300 feet, if you can even see the ceiling. Whatever the height, it is sufficient to block out the sun. The GPS unit is worthless on day 1. This hike reminded me more of some caves I've walked through back in the Midwest rather than a canyon in Arizona. The temperatures were very cool, but not cold, and I only went through 2 liters of water the entire day. Occasionally, the slots would emerge to a wide open riparian canyon area, (it turns out that one of these was the access to the middle trail route), but for the most part, it was a water filled slog through some serious mud. We were counting the pools that required wading, (nevermore than knee deep with one waist deep exception), but stopped after number 20 when we hit the Cesspool which was a series of one muddy pool after the other. I understand that in higher water conditions this can be one continuous ½ mile to 1 mile wade. (Thrills) In the middle of that Cesspool we come upon not one but three fledgling owls! Just sitting at the side of the trail. They were a little distressed to have our company which made us a little distressed as an 18 inch baby owl still packs some tremendous claws. We literally shimmied by and were happy that mamma was not around. (As far as we knew.) After the Cesspool we came upon the infamous Rock Fall and had our only serious challenge. (Although, I found the numerous tree trunks one had to crawl under much more annoying.) We had heard that there was a hole next to the 10 foot down climb that was much easier than scaling the face. Not hardly. We all took the down climb rather than the hole. Both ways had a rope with steps tied into it that probably would have held just fine, but we utilized our own rope and lowered packs and bodies down without incident. After this obstacle it took us a little less than an hour to negotiate the remaining muddy pools to reach the confluence. From there, it was approximately another hour until we reached the campsite at Wall Spring. (On the BLM map, Wall Spring is at P-9 whereas the Confluence is at P-7) While the spring is nothing spectacular, (it's easy to pump or you could even fill bottles directly), the campsite was a bomb. We got there at 6:00 pm, (16 miles in 9 ½ hours), and all were thoroughly exhausted. We had approximately 1 hour worth of breaks and lunch. We enjoyed a great meal, red wine, whiskey, the resulting spiritual enrichment, (smile), and tall tales until 11:00 pm. which while fun, was going to prove costly the very next day.

Day 2
While everybody awoke pretty early at 6:00 Am., it took us a little too long to hit the trail after the prior night's "festivities". We started off at 8:40 to clear skies and warm temperatures. (It turns out that the area received record highs and the day time highs approached the mid 90's instead of the mid to upper 80's we were expecting.) Whereas the first day was more like a cave adventure, the second day was more of a river walk as one is constantly in the muddy Paria. (Is that redundant?) The cliff walls are still vertical, but now they're at least 100 to 150 feet apart and open up to the sky. The GPS signal was intermittent at best. A little after 12:00 we lunched at a spot just a half mile past the Adams Trail which accesses the rim to the south. At this point, we held a vote and decided that since we were making such good time, to stick to the original 3 day game plan and make for the last "Reliable Spring" at mile marker P-25. In retrospect, this was probably a mistake. Day two ended up being much hotter, (lower 90's), and longer, (another 15+ miles and 9 ½ hours), than anticipated and we were all thoroughly beat when we hit our camp site at 6:00 that evening. A better plan would have been to camp at one of the last springs before Wrather Arch and make a 4 day hike out of it. Such is life. The high point of the afternoon was hitting Shower Springs at around 3:45 in the afternoon. By this point we were extremely hot, fatigued, and two people had run out of their 3 liters of water. (We should have stopped to fill up with water at one of the many springs before Wrather Arch.) Shower Spring is the spring to end all springs so please make note. It is above the river bed and tucked up into the corner of the left corner of the canyon as it makes a sharp 90 degree right hand turn. If you're quiet, you can actually hear the darn thing. It's Nirvana. Cold water dripping down off of a cliff face into a knee deep pool of potable water. Heaven. From here, we hiked the remaining 3 miles down to the last "Reliable Spring". The last leg of this segment traverses along the Keyenta Bench and the footing can be somewhat treacherous. After a sharp right turn, this spring appears on the left side of the river. (There is an awesome camp site before it on the rise on the right side of the river.) It is marked by a large cairn and a stick. We elected to go a ¼ mile further down the river to another spring and a bomb of a camp site right at the river's edge. This spring is a seep that comes up from the ground just on the right side of the river bank. According to the BLM map, this would put us just 13 miles from our exit in the morning. We reached this campsite again at 6:00 pm. Which made for another 16 mile and 9 ½ hour day. We probably had 1 ½ hours in breaks and lunch, but we were beat. I went through 5 liters of water this day. No revelry this night. It was dinner and bed. Not wanting to go through the same late afternoon affair as the prior day, we all hit the rack by 9:00. It was significantly warmer at this point in the canyon and our tent didn't cool off enough for sleeping until roughly 11:00.

Day 3
We got up promptly at 5:00 and after a short breakfast and filling up our water containers, we were on our way a little before 7:00 for the anticipated 13 mile exit to Lees Ferry. (It turned out to be closer to 11.5 miles as our campsite was a little ways past mile mark P-25.) Like the proceeding two days, this day's hike was different and unto itself. Whereas the first day was cave like, and the second day was constant river crossings at the bottom of the canyon, this day more resembled a Grand Canyon Hike, (ie: Tonto Trail traverse): climbing the side of the canyon with some exposure. Roughly a dozen river crossings were all we encountered. The temperature was in the lower to mid 90's by noon which was again above normal. We climbed several hundred feet and continued to head south while always maintaining about 300 to 400 feet above the river. After the initial climb, this trail proved to be very foot worthy and we made good time. The trail then heads down to a grassy plain and crosses the river several more times. We stopped for lunch at noon and thought we had another 3 ½ miles to go, but it turned out to be much less than that. (I guess the BLM would rather under estimate than over estimate.) We ended up coming out at our cars at 1:00 having traveled just under 11.5 miles in 6 hours which was less than expected, but we only had 45 minutes worth of breaks. Showers, (bring $3.00 worth of quarters at least), and beers were had back at the Marble Canyon Lodge before driving back to Phoenix.
_____________________
May 07 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Oak Flat, AZ 
Oak Flat, AZ
 
Backpack avatar May 07 2005
Tim
Backpack9.50 Miles 900 AEG
Backpack9.50 Miles   5 Hrs      1.90 mph
900 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
On Saturday afternoon May 7th, Carolyn and I headed out to the Eastern Superstitions for a quick over night camping trip to Oak Flat. The weather was perfect with clear skies, day time highs in the upper 70s, and nightly lows in the upper 40s. We pushed off from the Miles Trailhead at 1:00 and headed down the West Pinto Trail to Oak Flat. There was water flowing along the creek the entire way. This forced us to follow the actual trail which heads high up on the northern bank at one point. (I must have simply traveled straight up the dry creek bed in the past as I?d never been on this part of the trail before.) Along this section there was a recent rock slide which obliterated a portion of the trail much like one sees in the Grand Canyon. However, scrambling over the rock was no major obstacle.

We got to Oak Flat in just over an hour and dropped our backpacks by the old corral across the creek along Pinto Peak Trail. For fun, we took Pinto Peak Trail up the mountain for about an hour, (just short of hill 4691 on the topo) before turning around. The Pinto Peak Trail, while somewhat slippery with loose rock, is in real good shape and very easy to follow. Along the way we came across 4 older gentlemen, (Fred & Company), who were on their way down from assaulting Pinto Peak and had a nice visit comparing notes. All in all we did just over 5 miles before setting up camp and relaxing near the creek. The mosquitoes were abundant until the temperatures dropped around 8:00. It?s always special being able to camp next to a flowing creek with a bottle of wine. (smile) The stars were especially bright given the clear skies.

After sleeping in we headed back to the car. For fun, (again), we dropped our backpacks and headed up the Cuff Button Trail. We had originally planned on taking this trail as far as Oak Spring, but turned back at the top of a ridge less than a ? mile north of Jerky Spring on the topo map. Cuff Button is an older and less traveled trail that can be difficult to follow in spots. More importantly, it is covered in cat claw which makes it very slow going and somewhat painful. The ?fun? vs ?reward? factor just wasn?t there. Maybe next fall with cooler weather which would allow for long pants and long shirt sleeves this could be doable. After turning around and picking up the backpacks, the hike back was uneventful although we did spot a large bull snake slithering off in the shrubs along the trail. With the aborted side trip up a portion of the Cuff Button, day 2 was just a little over 4 miles back to the Miles Trailhead. A lovely way to spend the weekend.
_____________________
1 archive
Apr 02 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Dutchman Trail #104Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 02 2005
Tim
Hiking9.00 Miles 1,400 AEG
Hiking9.00 Miles   3 Hrs   45 Mns   2.40 mph
1,400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Carolyn and I set out for a short loop hike on Saturday morning April 2nd so that we could get back to Phoenix in time for the NCAA Final Four games later that afternoon. (The hike was more fun than the basketball games as it turned out.) We elected to head out from Peralta Trailhead on the Dutchman and come back via the Bluff Springs Trail. According to the Beartooth Map, this was an 8.5 mile loop but our GPS unit clocked it in at something slightly over 9 miles. We got to Peralta at 8:30 to find the upper lot completely full so we had to park down below. It was a beautiful day destined to be in the low 80's so the crowds were understandable.

The wild flowers were in full bloom and the trip on the Dutchman out to Miners Needle was a sea of green and yellow. I got the bejesus scared out of me when I was motoring along a scree filled downhill stretch when I damn near stepped on a snake. It was a 4 footer moving in my same direction in the grasses encroaching on the trail. Due to the poor footing I had a hard time stopping and I'm thinking that I'm gonna get "tagged" for sure. As I'm yelling at the snake for not buzzing, ("Buzz witch!"), I notice that it doesn't even have a rattle. (This all took place within a split second.) It was some sort of a bull snake, although it had more green markings on it than brown which puzzled me. It's head was definitely not that of a viper. Carolyn got a good chuckle our of my reaction and we moved on after snapping the obligatory picture.

We saw lots of groups on the trail. Between Miners Summit and Bluff Springs we had the trail to ourselves but saw multiple groups on our way back to Peralta from Bluff Springs. Not as much water as I expected given all of the recent rains. What water we did come across was standing in small pools. The loop took us 3 ¾ hours. We spoke to the Ranger on duty when we exited at 12:30 and he reported that up to that point, over 300 people had hit the trails from this location.
_____________________
1 archive
Mar 21 2005
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
Whetrock Canyon LoopGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 21 2005
Tim
Hiking6.50 Miles 700 AEG
Hiking6.50 Miles   4 Hrs   15 Mns   1.53 mph
700 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
See Hike Description.
_____________________
1 archive
Dec 28 2004
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 432

60 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
West Pinto - Spencer Spring LoopGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 28 2004
Tim
Hiking14.00 Miles 4,080 AEG
Hiking14.00 Miles   6 Hrs   30 Mns   2.15 mph
4,080 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I've wanted to make this hike for some time and my buddy Paul agreed to tackle it with me on Tuesday, December 28th. It was a nice partly sunny day with temperatures in the low 40's when we started and they hit the lower to mid 50's by noon. After a 1 ¾ hour drive from South Scottsdale, we pushed off at 8:15 from the Rogers Trough Trail Head in a clockwise direction. After 15 minutes, we were up the hill at Rogers Spring which was flowing nicely. It took us about ½ hour to make the 700 ft. climb to the first saddle on south side of Iron Mountain. The views into the eastern Superstitions and Pinto Peak to the northeast were stunning. After heading down the 400 ft. eastern slope of Iron Mountain to Iron Mountain Spring, (dry), the trail heads 300 ft. up a drainage north to a ridge that runs pretty much due east. From the saddle to the top of this ridge there was evidence of the Forest Service having been out doing some recent trail maintenance. The trail was not overgrown at all and was in very good shape. From the top of this ridge it's pretty much a steady down hill all the way to Oak Flat and the intersection with the Spencer Spring Trail. While all of the leaves were down at Oak Flat, it is still a pretty place. It took us 3 hours to traverse the 6.5 miles to the end of the West Pinto Trail at Oak Flat.

As we started the gradual climb up Spencer Creek, I shed my fleece and was quite comfortable in just a t-shirt. Having been on this part of the trail before, I knew what lay ahead, and wasn't looking forward to it. (smile) As Fritzski has pointed out, the trail doubles back at the 9.5 mile mark as it crosses the creek for the last time. From this point the trail is faint at best and a real bush whack. One can get 5 feet off the trail and not know it. Cairns are pretty much non-existent and the climb up hill is steep and very overgrown. (Some serious Forest Service maintenance is needed on this 1 mile stretch.) We eventually arrived at Spencer Spring where it was decision time. We saw the cairns pointing out the trail heading due south up steep hill to Forest Service Road 650. Rather than hike the road, we elected to continue west up the creek. We figured this "short cut" would save some mileage and save some time. (We had some concerns about rain in the forecast.) WRONG! I should know better by now.

It was a fun scramble up the creek bed but it was slow going picking one's way around the various obstacles. Our plan was to hit the old closed off portion of the Forest Service road that winds down into Spencer Creek a little ways. While no longer drivable, it is a virtual highway for hiking. (This closed road is clearly, and accurately, shown on the Beartooth Map. The Forest Service has erected an earthen berm where it intersects FR 650.) Unfortunately, we stayed in the creek bed too long and instead of intersecting this old road, we ended up paralleling it. (One wants to stay well right of the creek bed and out of the "green" area on the topo map so as to intersect this closed road.) Then to make matters worse, we got sucked into heading south up what appeared to be a clear exit up a drainage to FR 650. This was a virtual lobster trap that ended up with a ridiculous bush whack up the last 100 ft. to the road. We ended up hitting FR 650 a good ¼ mile east of our planned exit. From there it was roughly a mile and a 1/2 and 30 minutes back to the trailhead. Originally, we planned on taking the shortcut back to the trail head, (it's easy to find as it's where the creek bed crosses the road between to hills), but by this point in time, we had had enough of bush whacking short cuts. (smile) Actually, it didn't look to bad at all and it probably would have gotten us back just as quickly. ½ dozen one, 6 the other. In retrospect, I'd still recommend exiting up the creek, (provided you hit the old road), rather than slogging up the hill from Spencer Spring and hiking 3 miles of FR 650. All told, our GPS unit had the loop right at 14 miles and it took us 6 ½ hours with a 15 minute lunch break. It was a lot of work and I was thoroughly exhausted at the end.
_____________________
average hiking speed 2.14 mph
Previous  1 ... 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22  Next

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

helpcommentissue

end of page marker