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Cold Spring Canyon Ruins - 11 members in 46 triplogs have rated this an average 4.4 ( 1 to 5 best )
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May 05 2019
jamminaz
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 Routes 11
 Photos 505
 Triplogs 28

52 female
 Joined Apr 15 2016
 Gilbert, AZ
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar May 05 2019
jamminaz
Hiking4.02 Miles 1,191 AEG
Hiking4.02 Miles
1,191 ft AEG
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1st trip
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Jagardner833
When we hiked to the Pueblo Canyon ruins awhile back we didn’t check out this cliff dwelling. Since we were camping in the area we wanted to check it off our list. So glad we did! As others have mentioned, the scree up to the dwelling is nasty! Even worse coming down....
Flora
Flora
Saguaro - Crested
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2 archives
Jan 27 2019
MountainMatt
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 Guides 1
 Routes 184
 Photos 2,478
 Triplogs 402

27 male
 Joined Jan 24 2016
 Arizona
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 27 2019
MountainMatt
Hiking3.89 Miles 1,395 AEG
Hiking3.89 Miles   3 Hrs   19 Mns   1.90 mph
1,395 ft AEG   1 Hour   16 Mns Break30 LBS Pack
 
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Always wanted to check out the more popular Ancha dwellings but not enough to go out of my way but being in the general area this little hike fit the bill perfectly.

Encountered lion hunters and their dozen dogs who I presume were from the nearby Ellison Ranch since they were on horseback most likely hunting to protect their livestock.

Took a couple bait cowboy/cattle trails but rerouted quickly and made the steep but fun little climb to the “Crack House”.

Even with high visititation it’s still such a cool site and as always a humbling and privileged experience being in the presence of such special history.
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Wildflowers Observation Isolated
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Jan 20 2019
pace
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 Photos 42
 Triplogs 10

42 male
 Joined Sep 15 2002
 Gilbert, AZ
Pueblo Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 20 2019
pace
Hiking7.00 Miles 2,500 AEG
Hiking7.00 Miles
2,500 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
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Took the entire family to the Sierra Anchas to see some ruins. We arrived Sunday at just after 10 AM. We hiked up to Cold Spring Canyon Ruins, enjoyed our lunch, then headed over to Pueblo Canyon Ruins. Great hike and everyone did great, even my 9 year old never complained. We camped down below Devil's Chasm so we could do the that hike the next day. Enjoyed the blood moon and the solitude of the Sierra Anchas. Saw one other vehicle on our way in at Devil's Chasm, but never saw them after our hike or anyone else for that matter.
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Feb 24 2018
friendofThunde
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 Guides 16
 Routes 271
 Photos 7,496
 Triplogs 694

36 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Pueblo Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 24 2018
friendofThundergod
Hiking12.55 Miles 2,816 AEG
Hiking12.55 Miles   5 Hrs   55 Mns   2.28 mph
2,816 ft AEG      25 Mns Break
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carriejane
This was obviously not my first time here, but honestly this area will never get old for me. This time around some ice made the hike in a little interesting and as usual you can’t beat the nice feeling that goes along with showing someone this area for the first time.

The ruins were great as usual and as stated earlier the ice was a little interesting, or dicey in spots depending on who you ask. I still maintain that for this area the fire may have improved the area slightly, but the trail has probably suffered some due to post fire erosion, but oh well that just makes it a little tougher on the masses. There are certainly some better views along the trail now and most of the annoying scrub brushes and manzanita along the route have been eradicated, so that probably cancels out the eroded portions. We only saw two other hikers the entire day and the conditions were nearly perfect for hiking overall. I forgot about the third set of ruins in Pueblo, but the "crack house" more than made up for that small disappointment, I hope. I have said this before, but I would still be a big fan of the forest service closing the road at Devils Chasm. Currently, parking at Devils Chasm to avoid the tight boulder squeeze on the road adds an additional three miles to one’s hike, if going to Pueblo or Cold Springs.

We headed to the trailhead for the “lower” Coon Creek ruins on our way out, but after not even a half mile of walking across the drab desert there, neither of us including the dogs thought the ruins would be worth continuing. We will save that one for another day, when the creek may be a more tempting aproach to the ruins.

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Feb 24 2018
carriejane
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 Routes 1
 Photos 490
 Triplogs 166

29 female
 Joined Dec 26 2017
 Tucson. AZ
Pueblo Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 24 2018
carriejane
Hiking12.55 Miles 2,816 AEG
Hiking12.55 Miles   5 Hrs   55 Mns   2.28 mph
2,816 ft AEG      25 Mns Break
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friendofThundergod
Another huge thanks to @friendofThundergod for being the best tour guide for my first trip to Pueblo Canyon ruins and Crack House. The Pueblo Canyon ruins were incredible and well-worth the extreme difficulty I had hiking across the icy sections of the trail. As Lee noted, ice hiking is definitely not my strongest suite and I take full responsibility for our slow hiking time. :) Despite struggling with the ice, I found it exceedingly beautiful, like we had entered Narnia! (Or Nambia, as DJT would say). The Crack House absolutely blew me away! I'd write more but I have a 250 page research paper to read about them. Perks of dating a teacher...
2 archives
Jan 06 2018
Johnnie
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 Photos 770
 Triplogs 45

57 male
 Joined Nov 29 2009
 Gilbert, AZ
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 06 2018
Johnnie
Hiking4.02 Miles 1,191 AEG
Hiking4.02 Miles
1,191 ft AEG
 no routes
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I haven't been back to Cold Springs Canyon for a few year so it seem like a good time to go with 4 friends who had never been there. Mike, Casey, Dan and Dan. on the road in we were delayed helping a vehicle get by "THE BOULDER" we all helped doing some more landscaping and rock removal, My 4 runner (99) made it thru without spotters. everything went well on the hike up. I hadn't realized that the fire went thru in front of the ruin and now the picturesque tree and yucca plant are toast (literally). otherwise the ruin seems OK. lots of cloud cover so temps were good on the way up.the only wildlife we saw going in or out besides the cattle was a solitary Quail.
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Oct 14 2017
ddgrunning
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 Guides 1
 Routes 198
 Photos 3,365
 Triplogs 264

48 male
 Joined Apr 13 2011
 Gilbert, AZ
Cold Spring and Pueblo Canyon Ruins, AZ 
Cold Spring and Pueblo Canyon Ruins, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Oct 14 2017
ddgrunning
Hiking9.98 Miles 7,479 AEG
Hiking9.98 Miles   6 Hrs   26 Mns   1.66 mph
7,479 ft AEG      25 Mns Break
 
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After camping at Devil's Chasm TH, we awoke for a second day of adventure, tackling the Cold Spring and Pueblo Canyon Ruins.

While we were eating breakfast, a couple hiked by along the road, headed toward the Cold Spring TH. After we packed up camp, we piled in the Suburban for the rough 1.5 mi. drive down the road to the TH. Along the way, we caught up with the couple that had hiked by earlier, and offered them a lift.

There is a huge boulder that has broken away from the wall and landed on the road about half way from Devil's Chasm to the TH, making for a very tight squeeze for a suburban. We barely managed to get through unscathed.

Made it to the TH and hiked with the couple for the first 1/2 mile or so. They pointed out to us the Copper Canyon Ruins across the valley. A hike for another day ....

The couple was on their way to Pueblo Canyon, but first up for us was Cold Spring, so we went our separate ways and thought we might cross paths again somewhere in the Pueblo Canyon area.

I underestimated the amount of bushwhacking and scrambling required to access these sites. Definitely regretted leaving my long pants and gloves in the car. ](*,)

That said, it was worth the effort. The Cold Spring ruins were our favorite. What a cool structure! Especially the surprise balcony out the other side of the cliff face. There is a lot of "dwelling" packed in that little crack!

After enjoying the "crack house," we made our way back to the fork and then on to Pueblo Canyon. Once you get around to the first section of the north-facing side of the canyon, the vegetation gets pretty thick, and even with a gps track, it gets a bit difficult to follow the route. We ended up bushwhacking a fair amount in this area, and the going was slow. (We did much better on the return trip.). In this area, as a general rule, when in doubt, stay closer to the cliff face.

At the mine/north-facing ruins, we stopped for lunch and admired the 3 ruin sites which were our destination on the opposite side of the canyon wall.

The mine is not much for exploring. Doesn't go too far back, and was choked with flies/bugs.

At the crossover to the north side of the canyon, I was a bit surprised to see the waterfall flowing. Pretty magical place. Would have made a nice prehistoric shower :-).

We enjoyed all three ruin sites on the south-facing side of the canyon. These must have been impressive structures in their day, and it was fun to look around. Though frankly, at that point, we were a bit low on energy reserves and looking forward to getting back to civilization.

Speaking of which, I'm amazed and puzzled how the inhabitants of these structures actually lived on a day to day basis. Not so much in Pueblo Canyon, where water was close by and the navigation not so gnarly. But Cold Spring and Devil's Chasm? What a pain it must have been, not just to get building supplies up there, but a major daily grind to get water, food, and other necessities of life.

In any event, the return hike was uneventful.

Once back at the car, we piled in for the rough road to Cherry Creek. At the "boulder," we weren't quite as lucky as going in, and just when we thought we were in the clear, the rear wheel slipped a bit and we earned a little AZ pinstriping on the back of the Suburban :-$ Oh well; I guess that will be part of the memory of the trip ....

Speaking of the suburban, just as we got to the Cherry Creek crossing, the check engine light came on and the engine went into "reduced power mode." It didn't have enough power to get up the hills. We pulled over and let it cool down; put some water in the radiator and nursed it back to pavement. After a couple more stops, it started to run fine and we made it back to Phoenix without incident. ($425 later and a new "throttle body," we are back in business ...).

All in all, a fabulous overnight Sierra Ancha trifecta with my son.

P.S. As the track shows, Route Scout had a heck of a time trying to track us in Pueblo Canyon. So, not sure what our actual mileage/aeg statistics should be, but they are both definitely off ....
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Apr 05 2016
Oregon_Hiker
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 Guides 8
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 Triplogs 417

72 male
 Joined Dec 07 2010
 Phoenix, AZ
Cold Spring Canyon Road Hike, AZ 
Cold Spring Canyon Road Hike, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Apr 05 2016
Oregon_Hiker
Hiking5.90 Miles 1,432 AEG
Hiking5.90 Miles
1,432 ft AEG
 
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This hike explores the old Sierra Ancha mining road that leads to Cold Spring Canyon and from there south ending in an unnamed box canyon between Cold Spring Canyon and the North Fork of Devils Chasm. The road is also known as the Big Buck Uranium Mine Road. I have recently become interested in exploring old abandoned roads and active ranching trails in the Sierra Ancha with the objective of identifying these routes as unofficial hiking trails. These routes can provide additional hiking opportunities beyond the official Tonto Nat Forest and SA Wilderness trails. Although often overgrown with brush, some of these old roads and ranching trails are kept in fairly good hiking condition by cattle who break trails through the brush. In some cases these "trails" show signs of human brush and tree clearing, perhaps for ranching access. My secondary objective was to take a look at two archaeology sites along this road. One site was named "The Women Must Have Carried the Water" pueblo by Lange in his archaeology report "Echoes in the Canyons...." and also has the ASM site number V:1:169. He came up with this name after seeing it scrawled in a hand written note left by local rancher and guide Dewey Peterson on the original site form from one of Haury's archaeology expeditions in the early 1930's. I could not find a name or site ID number for the other site which is only 0.1 miles further down the "road".

This was my first full day hike of a 5 day - 4 night camping trip to Cherry Creek Canyon. I drove the short distance from camp [ description ] to the trailhead where a small group of National Park Service archaeologists had set up camp for four days. Unfortunately the only woman in the group was off in the bushes for some undisclosed activity but in plain site of the road as I drove up. She quickly returned to camp but was scowling at me while I told one of her team where I would be hiking for the day. They were gearing up to hike to the Cold Spring Canyon "Crack House" cliff dwelling for a 4 day assessment of the impact of modern day visitors to the site . (At least that's what they told me). They would be about 30 minutes behind me on the old mining road which is used to access the cliff dwelling site.

It was a beautiful morning and I took my time taking photos and scanning cliff sides and hilltops for signs of habitations by the ancients. I found the road had been kept open past the turn off to the cliff dwelling by heavy cattle use making it a decent hiking trail. As the road ascended the shady south side of CS Canyon there were patches of what appeared to be poison ivy that had to be brushed aside. I'm not 100 percent sure that's what it was but there is a picture of it in this trips photoset. I did not break out in a rash later but that's not unusual since I seem to be immune to it. I took a couple of short off trail explorations to look for ruins with no luck except for a small cliff dwelling I spotted on a far away cliff using the super zoom on my camera. The road split as it approached the first archaeology site with what appeared to be a newer and better built section passing below the site and a much more overgrown and less substantial road angling up the hillside through the middle of the ruin which is located in a small saddle. This road section is not on any maps I've studied which peaked my interest. I followed this road to the first ruin. It was listed as having 8-10 rooms in Haury's report but it's difficult to make out individual rooms because the rock walls have been scattered by the road construction, cattle and probably pot hunters since Haury's time in the early 1930s. However based on the number of rock piles I found hidden under clumps of brush, the 8-10 room estimate is most likely accurate. I continued on this road for about 0.1 miles to the next archaeology site. The road had also scattered the walls at this site but it appeared that this had also been a pueblo style site with as many or maybe more rooms that the first site. This site was on the point of a rocky bluff sticking out from the hill and overlooked Peak 4333 which Grasshopper and I had hiked to on March 20 [ photoset ].

The old road continued on past this ruin site but was so faint in some areas it was difficult to follow until there was an obvious cut in the hillside as it descended to the bottom of the drainage in the bottom of the unnamed box canyon. The road led to the approximate center of the box canyon where it crossed the drainage. The bottom of this canyon is covered with a thick forest of mostly Oak trees. There were good views from the road of the cliffs that lined the sides of this canyon and I spent time scanning the south facing cliffs for cliff dwellings but did not spot any likely caves or alcoves. The road appeared to end shortly after starting to ascend the other side of the drainage although there were some cattle trails that continued. At this point I turned around and retraced my route on the road back to the trailhead.

This old mining road proved to make a good hiking trail (as long as ranching activity continues) to a scenic and historical mining area of the SA not reached by any of the official trails. One concern might be the potential poison ivy in the trail where it ascends the shady south side of CS Canyon. Since the road was put in for the uranium mine it probably dates back to the early to mid 1950s. I did not see the Big Buck Uranium mine adit which must be somewhere along this road or the spur I did not follow - a reason to return.
Named place
Named place
Cold Spring Canyon
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Feb 28 2016
DarthStiller
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 Guides 15
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49 male
 Joined Jul 05 2006
 Mesa, AZ
Pueblo Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 28 2016
DarthStiller
Hiking7.00 Miles 2,500 AEG
Hiking7.00 Miles   7 Hrs      1.17 mph
2,500 ft AEG   1 Hour    Break
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SUICIDEKING
wallyfrack
Back in April of last year, I made my first attempt to do this hike. At that time it was me, Mike, and my co-worker Gordie, who has done Keet Seel as well as some hikes in the Superstitions. We got about 3 miles from the trailhead, just past Ellison Ranch, when I got a flat tire. It was right before the really gnarly section of Cherry Creek Road. We put on the spare, which was nearly flat, and made the slow crawl, 20 miles back to asphalt. Once we got air in the spare in Globe, we got home ok. It was already late in the year to try to go back since things were beginning to heat up. After waiting 10 months, this would be the day I would go back to get this hike done : rambo :. This time it was me, Wally, Mike, and Mike’s buddy Andy.

It was a pretty solid 3 hour drive to the “trailhead”, which is basically one parking spot on the side of the road, which got us started at about 7:30am. It was still pretty chilly when we got out of the car, but by the time we got to the junction to go over to Cold Spring, everyone had taken off their sweatshirts/jackets/flannel. The forecast for the day was a high of 68, but it easily seemed to be 80 by the time we were done for the day. It was noticeably cooler in the shade, but never to what could be considered chilly.

Just past the junction on our way over to Cold Spring, we saw a very young calf laying down off the trail. We got a few pics and a closer look. Mama was eyeing us from behind some bushes (so I was told, I never saw her). The fur looked wet enough that this was likely a newborn. Sadly, something seemed wrong with it as it didn’t even have the strength to stand. On our way back, it was still lying there. :cry:

We spotted the crack house ruin along the trail and made our way underneath it. Then we found the spot where you start to ascend up to it. This was one of the rougher parts of the day. It’s very steep on the way up, and the ground is loose. There is a lot of vegetation, but it’s very useful to hang onto to pull yourself up and hold onto to keep from falling on the way down. Except for the prickly pear cacti, those you had to make sure you avoided. Andy had a spill early, but no major injuries or broken bones like his incident on Camelback last year. Just below the ruin is a tree that’s grown across the trail that requires some flexibility to maneuver up, around, under and through. This was not the easiest thing to do as middle age approaches and a full back is on your back :yuck: . The rest of the hike would prove to have many sections like this.

Having read the triplogs from last year, I knew that there was a bees nest present in the spring of 2015. I warned Mike about that as he entered and he mentioned, in a somewhat concerned tone of voice, that there were a huge amount of flies inside. I was the third to enter, and as I did, it was odd at how all the flies were zooming out of the front door away from everyone. By the time we all entered, they were all almost gone.

Inside the crack house ruin was very cool. It took some effort to try to figure out how to access each level with the X-formation logs without falling, but we were all able to handle it. The big payoff for this ruin is the balcony in the upper level, which gives a very nice view of the adjacent mountain, as well as the sheer drop on the other side of the 700+ year old wall :scared:. Before I ascended to the top level, I went into the room under the floor and got a look at how it’s put together. For as old as it is, it’s in good shape, but it’s still just sticks and mud that was holding our collective body weight from crashing down. If you tap your foot on it, you can hear the hollow thump from the room below :-k.

Once we were done, we made our way back to the trail junction and on to Pueblo Canyon. The ascent up the canyon seemed brutal. The ground wasn’t nearly as steep or loose as the short ascent into the Cold Spring crack house ruin, but the thick vegetation still made for a lot of maneuvering. Also, while my recent hiking has involved a lot of distance, it has not involved much elevation gain. This was Mike’s second time into Pueblo Canyon, and he said he didn’t remember it being so difficult his first time :whistle:.

Once were level with the ruins on the north side of the canyon, the difficulty of the hiking wasn’t done. The trail maintains the same average elevation, but is in no way really level, as it goes up and down, up and down around trees, boulders and terrain. In addition to the inherent level of difficulty, someone who recently hiked both of these trails decided to do quite a lot of trimming to the surround vegetation. This would have been ok, other than the fact that all that vegetation was just left on the ground, which made for quite a few tripping and slipping hazards :tt: :gun:. The closer we got to the waterfall, the easier the trail became, with less ups and downs and choked vegetation. At one point along this section on the south side of the canyon, my foot caught on a tree root, and I almost fell forward over the edge of the trail. There are a few sections here where there is a little exposure. Looking across to either side of the canyon from which side you’re on, it’s easier to see how much exposure there really just beyond a lot of the vegetation that surrounds you on the trail. If you fall and the trees and bushes don’t catch you, you could easily be in a lot of trouble :stretch:.

The first ruins on the south side of the canyon were ok, nothing special. There’s a couple walls left that are built into the ground on the edge of the canyon, holding back from a sheer drop. Inside the main building, the fingerprints in the mud are still visible, very similar to what’s at Devil’s Chasm. The front wall of this one seems to have fallen down outwardly and over time sediment has filled in the rocks, that now stick out of the ground all lined up. It’s easy to miss if you don’t look closer. The mine tunnel entrance is also nearby. I took a look in, but didn’t feel the need to go inside and explore. Looking across the canyon, all three ruins on the north side were visible, which made for a similar look to Walnut Canyon near Flagstaff.

The waterfall was running with a good amount of flow. It reminded me of Ribbon Falls in the Grand Canyon a little bit. We all took turns getting various photo shots from various angles as we passed it. Walking behind it was nice feeling the cold rush of air and some mist :DANCE:.

The three sets of ruins on the north side of the canyon are all very interesting. The middle set has a 2 level room that the floor has fallen down on one side, revealing the layers of beams, sticks and mud that it’s made of. In these ruins it was possible to find some pottery shards if you did any amount of looking. I quickly found a couple pieces and put them on a rock to make them more visible for the next visitors. Wally pointed out to me some he found that were similarly put out, as well as a little cubby hole shelf inside one room that had a whole pile of shards. In the 2nd and 3rd sets, there are quite a lot of patches in walls that are easy to see from the different colored mud. It’s also easy to see spots where the style of construction suddenly changes along a wall, indicating some sort of rebuild at some point.

Looking at these sets of ruins from the south side of the canyon, it looks very easy to walk from set to set, but in fact it’s almost as difficult as the rest of the hike. It’s a little more open, but the ground still has a lot of obstacles to step over and the trail meanders up and down around boulders and terrain. At one point, the trail descends and ascends around rock and vegetation. In this little dip, the ground is very loose and steep, and at the bottom, it opens a bit to some thin vegetation. From the south side, it was easier to see how just below that thin vegetation was sheer drop off of several hundred feet :scared:.

We all made our way back to the car safely without incident, other than the typical scrapes, bruises and cactus needle sticks. We finished up at about 2:30pm, making for a total of 7 hours, including all our time for stopping to get photos, exploration and lunch.

I had Route Scout running and my Garmin Oregon to record the track. Once were inside Pueblo Canyon, both lost satellite signals, resulting in a zig zaggy track from each. In some cases, the zig zagging was nearly identical in the same spots. For mileage I’ll just go with posted routes that seem to list it at 6.8.

Having been to Mesa Verde two summers ago, doing a hike like this gives the impression of how manufactured the NPS sites are to some extent, mostly in terms of how much infrastructure is added for accessibility. Getting to these ruins is not easy, and it was obviously not meant to be. Maneuvering our way through the natural state of an unmaintained trail is quite a different experience from walking along a paved path at a gentle slope. I appreciate both experiences, but I like doing a hike like this to have a sense of exactly how much is done by the NPS to maintain the ruins they do. It was a very long day and a lot of work, but as usual, getting out to the Sierra Anchas is always worth it :GB: :DANCE: .
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May 16 2015
Lucyan
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 Routes 1
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39 female
 Joined Jan 18 2011
 In the Wild
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar May 16 2015
Lucyan
Hiking4.02 Miles 1,191 AEG
Hiking4.02 Miles
1,191 ft AEG
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Wildflowers Observation Substantial
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Apr 22 2015
JuanJaimeiii
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 Routes 562
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52 male
 Joined Jan 30 2011
 Chandler, AZ
Pueblo Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 22 2015
JuanJaimeiii
Hiking9.00 Miles 2,900 AEG
Hiking9.00 Miles   5 Hrs   28 Mns   1.91 mph
2,900 ft AEG      45 Mns Break
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Took Taylor on a hike he won't soon forget. He works for me and likes to get out and hike but lately he has been eating more than exercising. With that said he asked if I would take him on a hike at least once a week for the next month to get things kick started. I knew he would like this one and sure enough I was right.

Along the way we saw both the Pueblo Canyon ruins as well as the Cold Spring ruins. The highlights of this trip were tons of flowers including a bunch of Columbines, the waterfall flowing nicely, a rattlesnake, a wild turkey and for the grand finale we drove Cherry Creek road out to Young. (Sorry Bruce we can still go back and hit DC and take the road out that way as well)

All in all it was a great day and very cool trip.
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Apr 04 2015
Craigbhikin
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 Photos 312
 Triplogs 42

56 male
 Joined Apr 11 2011
 Mesa, AZ
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 04 2015
Craigbhikin
Hiking4.02 Miles 1,191 AEG
Hiking4.02 Miles
1,191 ft AEG
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1st trip
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Another great hike in the Sierra Ancha Wilderness area at Cold Springs Canyon Ruins. Kim, Stan Denny and I camped, and hiked. It was another beautiful Arizona weekend hiking. We were not able to get into the ruins due to a bee invasion, and I thought about calling Truly Nolen, but who would pick up the bill? :( Some areas wild flowers were better then other areas, but it was very green, and no other hikers were hiking Cold Springs that day.
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Wildflowers Observation Moderate
Some areas were better then others.
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Craigbehikin
Aug 21 2014
JuanJaimeiii
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 Routes 562
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52 male
 Joined Jan 30 2011
 Chandler, AZ
Cold Spring and Pueblo Canyon Ruins, AZ 
Cold Spring and Pueblo Canyon Ruins, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Aug 21 2014
JuanJaimeiii
Hiking9.00 Miles 2,900 AEG
Hiking9.00 Miles   5 Hrs   59 Mns   1.50 mph
2,900 ft AEG
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The plan was to drive Senator Highway and hit some points of interest along the way. Threats of rain and a muddy Highway had us switching to plan B.

Plan B consisted of a hike and a tour of both the Cold Spring Ruins as well as the Pueblo Canyon Ruins.

We drove in and Cherry Creek Road with it's creek crossings was kind to us today. No issues what so ever. Once at the trailhead it was a bit muggy and warmer than expected. Off we went heading to Cold Spring Ruins first. This two story beauty is so cool with its views and balcony. Along the way we would sample prickly pear fruit. The fruit was so big it looked as if it was ready to pop.

Then after a nice visit we rounded the corner and headed for the multi-units in Pueblo Canyon. I forgot just how awesome the hike into this canyon was. It is lush and full of water seeps and tons of foliage. You almost feel like you are in a tropical oasis. The dwellings themselves are always an impressive site.

Afterwards I decided to take a shot at reaching the top via a scree shoot just around the corner from the dwellings. While it is doable I am not sure it would make much sense to go up there for anything other than exploration. I looked on Route Manager to see if there was a trail close to where I was at and nothing really exists. I will say the views from up there were spectacular.

I returned the way I came and joined back up with The Eagle. It appeared that rain was going to break out of the sky at any moment. Luckily we only received a light sprinkle. Back to the Jeep and then an easy ride out.

We had ourselves a great day out in the Sierra Ancha today! I wish we would have had time to do Devils Chasm as well. Dinner was calling.
Named place
Named place
Cold Spring Canyon Pueblo Canyon
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1 archive
Aug 21 2014
The_Eagle
avatar

 Guides 5
 Routes 784
 Photos 8,978
 Triplogs 1,044

63 male
 Joined Jan 20 2009
 Far NE Phoenix,
Cold Spring and Pueblo Canyon Ruins Tour, AZ 
Cold Spring and Pueblo Canyon Ruins Tour, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Aug 21 2014
The_Eagle
Hiking6.78 Miles 2,395 AEG
Hiking6.78 Miles   6 Hrs   2 Mns   1.68 mph
2,395 ft AEG   2 Hrs    Break12 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners partners
JuanJaimeiii
Our plan "A" cancelled for the 2nd week in a row because they've had 11" on rain in 2 weeks there. As far as plan B's go.... This one Rocks Big Time! It was put together at 9pm the night before.

First, I challenge anyone to get down Cherry Creek Road to the TH any faster than JJ. There were 3 water crossings, all a piece of cake, even the final Cherry Creek crossing. It's definitely a high clearance road past the last Cherry Creek crossing, some might attempt it w/o 4x4, not sure I have the nards to give it a try. Saw some deer and Javelina on the way in, as well as numerous Vultures, sitting on fences next to the road, eyeing us.

Up to Cold Spring Canyon Ruins first, just less than 1.5 miles and 1100' of AEG. The trail is easy enough to follow to get into the ruins. This a 3 level Ruin, not all that big, but they had some great views. with a couple of verandas. One at the South end, one at the East end.

Off to Pueblo Canyon Ruins next. This is a whole nother type of ruins area. If you only have time for one while in the area, this is the one. The hike itself is 100x more interesting.

If you start at FR203 (Cherry Creek Rd), this is about 2.6 miles and 1600' of AEG to get to the farthest ruins. A very picturesque hike once most of your elevation is complete, you get your first views of the Ruins on the north side. You'll be following the contours of the canyon at around 5300' under alcoves, in the riparian area, past less impressive ruins, past the old mine and then you make your way under the waterfall when you start turning back to the east to the 3 main ruin sites.

We took our time going through these sites checking them out. We went around the corner so JJ could check out a scree field for a possible future assault from the top to this ruin. As he was gone for his 15 minutes of checking, I took an hour and 10 minute break.

The skies were getting darker and it was starting to sprinkle, so we thought it best to get it in gear and get on that road in case we got a deluge like earlier in the week.

A great hike and adventure.. I finally got out to this area... Now the Devils Chasm is the next to get off the list.

Thanks for driving JJ Andretti!

Now a plug for JJ's Real Estate selling abilities.
Can he actually sell me a broken down property? They are kind of long, but that's what happens when you hike with a salesman.


Disclaimer.. Pay no attention to the dollar values or room quantities. He's a Realtor and does not have to be correct. Videos will be too long for most.

Cold Spring Canyon Condo :next: http://youtu.be/J-RUUg0oT-Q
Pueblo Canyon Estates - North :next: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mzel9Di_oVs
Pueblo Canyon Estates - South :next: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JHskTeIDudM
Fauna
Fauna
Tarantula
Culture
Culture
Graffiti Inscriptions
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
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There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness."
Dave Barry
1 archive
Apr 28 2014
PrestonSands
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 Guides 168
 Routes 149
 Photos 5,534
 Triplogs 1,317

41 male
 Joined Apr 12 2004
 Oro Valley, AZ
Pueblo Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 28 2014
PrestonSands
Hiking8.00 Miles 3,517 AEG
Hiking8.00 Miles   10 Hrs   30 Mns   1.23 mph
3,517 ft AEG   4 Hrs    Break16 LBS Pack
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
After a late night arrival and an unmercifully brief amount of sleep, I awoke at my campsite on FR 202 overlooking Cherry Creek and prepared for a day of cliff dwelling visitation. I passed the Ellison Ranch at the final Cherry Creek crossing and was soon at Devils Chasm, where I had planned to park. Surprise, the creek crossing was in perfect shape! I motored on, finally parking near the Cold Spring Canyon crossing. I donned my hat and pack and began the rocky climb up the old mine road.

Mine road became trail and then narrow path, and I pushed my way across a mountainside of thick brush. The north facing slope of Pueblo Canyon was a fern and forest paradise, with numerous seep springs, massive cliff walls and amazing views of my prehistoric destination that seemed deceptively close. After a time consuming traverse, I reached the old uranium mine tunnel. The builders of the north facing cliff dwelling next to the mine certainly had picked a wonderful spot. I wouldn't mind living here.

The sound of falling water greeted me as the canyon floor rose up to meet the trail, where I passed behind a lofty waterfall. The pool below it looked inviting, but the cool, windy conditions said otherwise.

A tiny, buzzing rattlesnake greeted me next to the trail as I approached the first cliff dwelling, but quickly withdrew into a crack to flick its tongue at me. This first dwelling, a.k.a. "Ringtail Ruin" was much larger and more impressive than I had expected. I marveled at the architecture and effort, exercised my camera and then sat down in the shade of the overhanging cliff to eat lunch. To my great surprise, two hikers soon appeared (the only others I would see the entire day). I talked with a man from Glenwood, New Mexico and his friend from Tucson before continuing on to the other ruins nearby. Another ruin destination was on my list for the day, so I made a quick retreat from Pueblo Canyon back to the old mine road, sending some large beast crashing into the trees in the process (I'm guessing a clumsy deer or probable bear).

Turning off onto another mine road, I rounded a ridge and entered Cold Spring Canyon, where my second and final destination of the day quickly came into sight: V:1:136, the "Crack House". Leaving this overgrown mine road, I fought gravity and vegetation and made the steep and slippery scramble up the mountainside to the ruin in the crack.

I had been wanting to see this ruin for years, so this was a special moment. Dumping my pack, I climbed three sets of wooden logs that acted as crude ladders to access the roof of the dwelling, located in a cave in the cliff. The Sierra Ancha Project had replaced one of the key roof beams 30 years earlier to stabilize the site, but I still walked VERY carefully for fear of damaging this amazing place. Peering over the edge of the balcony room in the cliff face overlooking Cold Spring Canyon was a fulfilling experience. Just an amazing place. The day soon grew late, so I made my way down from the Cold Spring Canyon ruin and began the hike back to Cherry Creek Road.

Back at my truck, I chose to blow off my concert plans later in the evening and spend a little more time with my beloved Sierra Ancha. I made my way down to Cherry Creek from Devils Chasm to enjoy an evening swim and then ate dinner on my tailgate, watching the Sierra Ancha skies fade to black. Days like these live among my very best memories.

Thoughts of work the next day finally motivated me to head for home. I arrived home in Tucson at 2 am, dead exhausted, with work only a few hours away. As usual, it was totally worth the exhaustion. It was a wonderful trip. :y:

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Pueblo Canyon Light flow Light flow
waterfall was raining nicely, maybe a gallon a second
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"I'm going for a coffee, but you never know when a hike might break out." -Jim Gaffigan
Nov 11 2012
jaboneagar
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 Photos 80
 Triplogs 46

39 male
 Joined Jan 27 2011
 Arizona
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 11 2012
jaboneagar
Hiking4.02 Miles 1,191 AEG
Hiking4.02 Miles
1,191 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
A cool ruin to explore. Check out the balcony room
_____________________
Jabon Eagar
Photographer/ Explorer
http://www.jaboneagar.com
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Jabon-Eag ... 270?ref=hl
Jun 02 2012
Palmpilot
avatar

 Photos 92
 Triplogs 4

47 male
 Joined Jun 21 2012
 Tucson
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 02 2012
Palmpilot
Hiking4.02 Miles 1,191 AEG
Hiking4.02 Miles
1,191 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
We chose the hottest day of the year up to that point, June 1st 2012, to head up to the Sierra Ancha-107 F in Tucson! We spent the night at our camp site, just off Cherry Creek road and about 100 yards shy of the old minning road that leads up to Pueblo Canyon/Canyon Springs ruin and enjoyed the approaching full moon. Got up at 6am and launched for the trail at 7am. We encountered 2 other hikers/campers at the top of the mining road; they were getting ready to head out for Pueblo Canyon ruins. Being a Saturday, I wasnt surprised to see other human beings out there, but we got lucky in that, after reaching Cold Spring Canyon ruins, we had it all to ourselves!

I was however surprised at how quickly we found the "Crack House". We must have been going at a pretty good pace, even in the heat and blazing sun! It felt good at 7am, but not at 8am! another surprise (and a pleasant one at that) was the lack of rattle snakes! I figured we would see at least one coiled up under a tree just off trail, but NO! The tree log ladders were alot easier to ascend than I expected! I wont go on and on about the ruins,as you've already read about them or seen them, but we spent about 2 hours there, got plenty of pics, including some of Cooper Forks Canyon Ruins visible to the east. We headed back down the trail (still no snakes) and headed up towards Pueblo Canyon Ruins. We made it as far as the vista over looking the north rim and got more good pics, then deceided to head back to the camp, due to extreme heat and low water supply. I look forward to PC ruins and CFC ruins soon....
_____________________
Mar 17 2012
evanshiker
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 Routes 16
 Photos 921
 Triplogs 41

male
 Joined Jan 22 2007
 Mesa, AZ
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 17 2012
evanshiker
Hiking4.02 Miles 1,191 AEG
Hiking4.02 Miles
1,191 ft AEG
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Did this hike on Saturday, this time taking several of my grandkids who were interested. They enjoyed it immensely. They are old enough (17 to 25) to fully appreciate and respect the cultural significance to this area. Hopefully, they can take their grandkids to visit some day. Having made my first visit there just one year ago, I couldn't detect any deterioration in this jewel. The wooden poles that you have to climb to get in and up to the 2nd and 3rd floors did not creak any more than they did last year. But a year is a short time in the life time of this place.

Weather was great - the wind that preceded the storm on Sunday just started to come up as we were coming back down the trail.

Water level in Cherry Creek was the lowest I've seen in my 5 trips to the area. Hopefully the storm on Sunday and Monday did a soaker on the area and not a gully-washer. But the road was good.

If, in the near future, you visit this area and spot a wallet along the road or trail, it may be my grandson's. He lost his somewhere up there. Just PM me if you find it. Thanks.
Culture
Culture
HAZ Rides
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To plunder, to slaughter, to steal, these things they misname empire; and where they make a wilderness, they call it peace. -- Publius Cornelius Tacitus (56 AD – 117 AD)
Feb 01 2012
JuanJaimeiii
avatar

 Routes 562
 Photos 7,588
 Triplogs 1,573

52 male
 Joined Jan 30 2011
 Chandler, AZ
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 01 2012
JuanJaimeiii
Hiking2.90 Miles 1,447 AEG
Hiking2.90 Miles   2 Hrs   13 Mns   1.31 mph
1,447 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
After making an attempt at Devils Chasm the other day my interest was really peaked in seeing the ruins. Joel and I set out to do both Devils Chasm and Cold Springs today. We started by doing Cold Springs and wow was it cool! I would have to say that my favorite part of this particular ruin is the balcony. The views from this piece of prime real estate are amazing! Very impressive indeed!
_____________________
Feb 01 2012
MtnBart01
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 Guides 3
 Routes 24
 Photos 3,413
 Triplogs 877

50 male
 Joined Aug 23 2005
 Chipita Park, Co
Cold Spring Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 01 2012
MtnBart01
Hiking2.90 Miles 1,447 AEG
Hiking2.90 Miles   2 Hrs   13 Mns   1.31 mph
1,447 ft AEG
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
JuanJaimeiii
Quick hike up the canyon proper after making arrangements with the cattle on the road to let us park. :) The fact that Johns jeep did not have a reverse all of a sudden was a foreshadow to the end of this trip, but at this point we were content with a full day of hiking ahead of us. Came down the old mining road to make a loop.
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LET IT SNOW! Let it SNOW! Let it Snow!
average hiking speed 1.66 mph
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