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The Barracks - 6 members in 6 triplogs have rated this an average 4.7 ( 1 to 5 best )
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Oct 18 2019
louie
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 Photos 46
 Triplogs 10

48 male
 Joined Jan 07 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
The BarracksSouthwest, UT
Southwest, UT
Backpack avatar Oct 18 2019
louie
Backpack21.16 Miles 2,000 AEG
Backpack21.16 Miles
2,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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Did this as a one way thru hike. River flow varied from 48 – 52cfs and never got my balls wet! I hiked this in Adidas Terrex Hydro Lace Boots and wore .5mm neoprene socks and had no issues with the water temps. I wore water proof, theoretically, breathable pants and tucked the bottoms into my boots and even when the water got thigh deep my legs stayed dry and warm for the most part. Per some canyoneering sites water temps were at 50 degrees.

Night time temps were in the mid 30’s so went with my outdoor vitals 30 degree down bag, a summer bag bivy, and slept on a hammock with my thermarest. I was worried having that cold air under my hammock would make me regret my sleeping choice, but as long as I stayed on top of my thermarest I stayed warm enough, but I wore two layers of pants, socks, and tops along with my light weight down jacket to bed every night.

Loved the fact we could have campfires! That made this adventure sooooo much more enjoyable.
The one bummer was it was hunting season and this place is full of deer so was not a fan of the intermittent gun fire. It was kind of creepy as you could see the hunters in their orange outfits running around the cliffs above us looking for deer to shoot and we just hoped we wouldn’t end up in the crossfire. We passed numerous hunters piecing out their kills and passed a few piles of the guts left behind by others. And then there was the dead deer in the river and a few carcasses along the trail that you could tell had been shot, but the hunters never were able to track down their kill. So just kind of put a damper on things and convinced me I would never hike this area again during rifle season.

The canyon itself was phenomenal! The best place to camp to have easy access to spring water to purify is Rock Canyon and Poverty Wash. I wish I could have spent more time in Rock Canyon, but did hike up maybe a quarter mile to a nice spring flowing right out of the sandstone and there is a pretty good doable camp spot along this area as well.

Poverty wash was awesome! The poverty narrows were sweet and made it to the end where you found yourself in this cool little circular room. There was no sign of cattle so the water in here seemed like it would be the least polluted. Misery canyon is in this same area as well and it was a pretty cool narrow canyon with high walls that became clogged with debris after a few hundred feet.

Mineral gulch had some pretty cool narrows worth exploring, but the water had less flow and wasn’t a fan of the cow pies along the spring fed stream.

Was not a fan of the hike out to get to Checkerboard Mesa. Too much exposure and free climbing for me and I would not do this again with a pack…but then again I’m damn near 50 and am becoming much more cautious in my middle-aged life. I just can’t scramble like I could 20 years ago and there were too many spots where one slip would mean serious injury or death.
Definitely download the route to an app on your phone or a Garmin as we lost the trail out more than once and being able to point ourselves back to the route bailed us out from getting completely lost.

We had high-clearance 4x4’s and we were able to easily drive to Bill Hay Canyon and discovered later we could have pushed it and made it another half-mile or so to where the road went hard left up the canyon leaving the river. Apparently, this road is another way to access the canyon and we ran into a few parties that were doing out and backs via use trails along Rock Canyon and Mineral Gulch. But there has to be a whole bunch of ATV trails and jeep roads that get people to the canyons edge and a bunch of use trails that drop to the canyon floor based on all the hunters we saw at the tops of the cliffs. That would be my route of choice for future expeditions via some sort of out and back although hiking up stream would definitely be exhausting, but still seems much safer.

Had no issue with the bypass around the fall. There was a climber rope there which was helpful, but as long as you take your pack off you can slide down on your stomach and pretty quickly you’ll feel footholds. But definitely take your pack off!

Awesome adventure!!!
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Substantial
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May 30 2018
bezzantine
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 Guides 1
 Routes 3
 Photos 33
 Triplogs 5

46 male
 Joined Apr 17 2013
 Mesa, AZ
The BarracksSouthwest, UT
Southwest, UT
Hiking avatar May 30 2018
bezzantine
Hiking16.00 Miles 2,000 AEG
Hiking16.00 Miles
2,000 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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BARRACKS SNEAK VIA POVERTY ROAD (2 days)

To bypass what seemed the least-interesting stretch of this hike, we started at Poverty Rd just a few miles from the Zion east gate. This route can be hiked from just off Hwy 9, but high-clearance 4x4 trucks going down Poverty Rd cut the hike by another couple miles or so. An ATV/UTV/rock crawler can get you even closer - to within less than 2 miles from the floor of Parunaweap canyon on this route. Any way you do it, the first part is a straightforward, nearly all downhill road march.

First day, we started about 7am, and were at the river by 10. From there, it's extremely pleasant hiking along the river bed, in and out of water countless times. It had been a dry year, and water was ankle to knee deep in most places. It was also reasonably clear, and we filtered/purified water straight from the river in most cases.

There were plenty of viable camp sites. We started by backtracking and exploring Mineral Gulch (totally worth it, and a preview of the good narrows further down Parunaweap). We had time for this, catching some petroglyphs along the way, and exploring French Canyon (Pretty, worthwhile, but we didn't follow it more than a half mile before the poison ivy density got pretty forbidding) before making camp just past Poverty Wash, all well before dark. We saw one other person.

Second day, we explored Poverty Wash (I'd call this the best of the side canyons, with a fantastic little grotto at the end), then went for the Barracks narrows. Some in our party helped each other over the falls at the well-known obstacle. Most took the bypass upstream and LDC of the obstacle. The bypass means a brief bit of on-all-fours up and downclimbing, including a cavey bit, but is class 3 at worst, and requires no lamp. While there are swimmable-depth spots here and there, water rarely was more than knee deep, and never above the belt unless you wanted it to be.

Beyond that, the scenic quality of the narrows goes from amazing to ridiculous as you wind out the last mile or so. Flash flood danger is highest in this stretch, where escape routes are rare until you hit the Powell plaque.

The Powell plaque is at a wide river bend; a great spot to relax, dump the gravel out of your shoes, maybe put on dry socks. Load up on water in the river or the clearer, but slow-flowing spring LDC, just across from the plaque. We had our fun, and now it was time to pay. We hiked out in mostly full sun on June 1st, with temps in prob the low 90s. It's a 500' up, half-mile class 3 scramble before *relatively* leveling off for another 4ish miles that more or less gradually take you up another 1000'. Do not underestimate this part of the hike. The initial scramble has some disturbing over-the-shoulder views for those not comfortable with heights,though exposure is minimal IF you stay on trail. Take plenty of water, because you won't see anything but a few slimy potholes until you're back at Hwy 9's Checkerboard Mesa pullout. This is typical Colorado Plateau geology, which is beautiful, but can be frustrating to cross. Be prepared for significant sand slogs, enough naked sandstone to repeatedly make you wonder where the trail went if you don't have your land nav game together, and a basically relentless climb that gets worst at the saddle west of Checkerboard Mesa before opening onto a final downhill mile. First people we saw this day were day hikers on the last mile only.

Brief points in addition to usual hiking gear/prep:
1. I strongly recommend GPS and a downloaded trail to follow, or good map and compass if you have the skills. I'm a HUGE fan of smartphone apps like Gaia and ScenicMap that have off-grid map download and gpx trail functions. The first part of the trip (Poverty Rd and along the river) are easy to follow, but GPS will help you find the petroglyphs and side canyons. Most importantly, it will keep you from getting dangerously lost and dehydrated on the last 4-5 miles between Parunaweap and Hwy 9. Cell signal (Verizon, at least) was almost nonexistent until near Hwy 9).
2. Sealskinz type socks or even cheap 2-3mm neoprene socks make creek hiking much more fun. These make a great combination with quick-drying trail running shoes for both the wet and dry parts of the hike. Trek poles are also great for moving quickly and confidently along the riverbed.
3. Re: camping - Between Mineral Gulch and Poverty Wash, there were many places with enough trees for hammocks, plenty of firewood around, and abundant tent space.
4. I recommend at least 2L/person departing from the river and starting the outhike, and maybe double that in serious midsummer heat.
5. If you've read this far... This is an AMAZING hike! Go get it while you can!
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Oct 21 2017
John9L
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 Guides 6
 Routes 170
 Photos 4,848
 Triplogs 1,619

male
 Joined Mar 12 2004
 Scottsdale, AZ
The BarracksSouthwest, UT
Southwest, UT
Backpack avatar Oct 21 2017
John9L
Backpack28.30 Miles 3,500 AEG
Backpack28.30 Miles3 Days         
3,500 ft AEG
 
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chumley
zukerrach
I never heard of Parunuweap Canyon until @volcanoCLMBR posted a triplog earlier this summer. I thought the place looked amazing and did some research. It seemed too good to be true so Chumley and I put it on the list. Then Rachel contacted me saying her and Jared will be visiting and we thought this would be a great option. Our original group was going to be seven people but things came up and we settled on a group of four of us.

Chumley and I drove up on Friday night and car camped east of Kanab. We met Rachel and Jared on Saturday morning in Mt Carmel. We then shuttled Chumley’s truck to the trailhead at Checkerboard Mesa in Zion National Park. We left a note in the car for Zion NPS and then headed back east to our starting point near Mt Carmel. We geared up and started our three day trip into paradise!


Day 1 – Saturday, October 21
After setting up the shuttle the four of us started the hike in following an active forest road. The going was somewhat monotonous but we made good time as we were passed by Quads, ATVs & trucks. Hunting season started this day so there were a lot of people out. We had at least a dozen wet crossings over the East Fork of the Virgin River over the first five miles. The water was chilly but the sun was out so we were comfortable. We left the road after five miles and the canyon starts to tighten up. Our pace slowed down as we waded through the Virgin. There would be a mix of wading and hiking along the banks. Fall colors were nice but we were at least a week or two late for prime.

We kept at it and eventually reached Mineral Gulch where we set up camp. The Virgin was a bit muddy so we were glad to see cold and clear water flowing out of Mineral Gulch. We never had to filter water from the muddy Virgin River. After camp was set up the four of us started a day hike up Mineral. We knew right away we were in for a treat! The canyon has water flowing for the first quarter mile as you meander through narrows and several slots. Our expectations were blown away as we progressed! This side canyon is spectacular! After a mile the canyon opens up and we continued heading north. We wanted to make it all the way to 7 Arch Alcove but it was farther than expected so we turned around. We wanted to get back to camp and settle into a campfire before darkness set in. The return flew by and we enjoyed a wonderful campfire. All of us were sleeping by 10pm. Overnight lows got very chilly but could have been worse.


Day 2 – Sunday, October 22
Our day two started very slowly. It was very cold overnight so we waited for the sun to rise. Once up we started the campfire again and had a slow and relaxing morning. I had coffee & oatmeal and enjoyed the morning. We eventually packed up and started hiking around 11:30am which is very late for us. Our plan was to hike 5-6 mile to our next campsite situated by Poverty Wash.

The hiking went well on day two. We found ourselves in the creek more so our pace was slow. The water was cold but several of us were wearing Neoprene Socks and this helped a lot. Most of the water was ankle to knee deep today. The biggest issue was mud and watching out for deep spots. We didn’t have any issues. We continued on as the canyon tightened up which made for dramatic views. After a couple of miles we detoured over to a petroglyph panel that was very impressive. It was early afternoon and the sun made picture taking difficult. From there we continued the final few miles and set up camp at the mouth of Poverty Wash. This wash had clear water flowing which made for easy filtering.

After camp was set up, Chumley and I set out for a day hike up Poverty Wash. This turned out to be another spectacular canyon! The water was flowing the whole way and more narrows greeted up. This canyon was very lush and scenic too! As we neared the end the canyon tightens and it appears to end. We were delighted to see a cave like slot canyon that led further. There was a simple scramble and we arrived at the end of the road in the Poverty Grotto. We absolutely loved this area! From there we made our return and took a variety of pics. This side trip took about an hour. Afterward, I filtered watered and settled in at camp while Chumley hiked back up canyon to check out another side canyon. All of us settled in for the evening around the campfire. It was a bit warmer tonight but temps got chilly again overnight.


Day 3 – Monday, October 23
We woke on day three around sunrise at 7:30am. It was really cold again so we built a fire and tore down camp. Our plan was to hike the rest of the way down canyon with stops at the Boulder Jam & Misery Canyon. After that we’ll exit the canyon and return to the truck parked at Checkerboard Mesa inside Zion National Park. We expected today to be easy but it turned out to a lot of work!

We hit the trail around 8:30am and were back in the water. The going was mostly easy as we snaked our way down canyon. This stretch of The Barracks is fantastic! The walls were high and there were fewer benches to avoid water. A couple spots were thigh deep but nothing too bad. You had to be careful to avoid mud and deep spots. The hiking pole helped a lot.

We continued on and hit the Boulder Jam within an hour of starting. I knew what to expect and climbed up to scope out the bypass while the others took pics. We then regrouped and made the climb up. We hit the rabbit hole and Rachel went first followed by myself, Chumley and Jared. The rabbit hole has a series of ledges to climb down and a fixed rope that helped but was not critical. We lowered the packs in stages and took our time scrambling and crawling through. I would guess the rabbit hole has a 25 ft drop. It was damn fun!

Once at the bottom we continued another half mile to Misery Canyon. We planned on exploring this canyon but you had a swimmer to get it. None of us were motivated to fully submerge so we kept going and found ourselves at the exit route ten minutes later. Once there we found the Powell Plaque (It’s hard to see behind some scrub) and washed the sand out of our shoes. From there we made the aggressive scramble up the exit route. It took some work but wasn’t too bad. Once above the canyon we started the long and slow trek into Zion. There is a good use trail to follow but you’re walking in sand for long stretches. It was sunny and warm and this section took more effort than expected. We took several breaks and enjoyed the amazing views! The final push along Checkerboard Mesa was exhausting but we got it done and were back to the truck by early afternoon. Once there we headed back to the starting point to grab the other car and then on to Kanab for lunch. Chumley and I said goodbye to Rachel and Jared and then headed back to Phoenix. Another trip in the books!


Final Thoughts
This is a spectacular canyon similar to the Zion Narrows but without the crowds. We only saw six people after leaving the forest road in the beginning.

Neoprene Socks and hiking poles helped a lot! The water was cold and muddy and slippery. The poles also helped measure depth so we could avoid deep spots.

I don't recommend hiking here during the winter unless you're seasoned for those conditions. The overnight temps got into the upper 30's for us. Borderline uncomfortable. My thought for best time is April/May or Sept/early Oct. Summer is okay but hike out early. With that...

Don't underestimate the hike out. It's roughly 4.5 miles and 1,600 ft of gain. It's slow and hard going. It's a mix of rugged scrambling, long stretches through sand, more climbing and generally slow going all the way to the road. It has little shade and never lets up. Go prepared with lots of water & snacks.

Give yourself at least 3-5 hours for Mineral Gulch. There are several arms that look interesting. We had about two hours. An hour+ is good for Poverty Wash. We didn't go into Misery. The entrance is tricky. Pretty much a swimmer.

You don’t need a permit for this and fires are permitted. Keep in mind you’ll need to leave a vehicle in Zion so you have to pay the entrance fee. Leave a note in your vehicle with your plan and exit date and name of the vehicle owner.

This canyon has lots of entry and exit points. You may be able to piece together a loop using forest roads. Check conditions before doing this. Some of the roads may be in bad shape.

This canyon is spectacular and highly recommended! I’m already thinking about a return trip in 2018!
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Autumn - Color Foliage
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4 archives
Oct 21 2017
chumley
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 Guides 76
 Routes 672
 Photos 14,131
 Triplogs 1,484

47 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
The Baracks, UT 
The Baracks, UT
 
Backpack avatar Oct 21 2017
chumley
Backpack31.40 Miles 3,500 AEG
Backpack31.40 Miles3 Days         
3,500 ft AEG
 
1st trip
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John9L
zukerrach
*Yes. I posted an obnoxious number of photos for a single trip. Sorry. It really was that amazing.

Background: In the waning days of President Obama's second term in office, he sought to cement his legacy with a series of environmental proclamations. Long accused of narcissism by his opponents, Michelle managed to convince her husband to forego his previous plan to have his face added to Mount Rushmore and instead choose something under the radar to put his name on.

So buried somewhere deep in the Bears Ears monument declaration was a short paragraph that renamed this otherwise unknown canyon in southern Utah after the man who said it reminded him of a canyon near his childhood home in rural Kenya. He had hoped to share some of his contempt for Utah with similarly "red" Wyoming, but there aren't any cool canyons there, so he had to just double up on Utah. Plus what president wouldn't want to put his name on a virgin? :o

A lot of the documentation is lost in some emails that James Comey talked about once, but they haven't been made public. What seems clear is that while DOI was willing to go along with a single under-the-table named designation, the president wanted more than one. A compromise was reached however, allowing for a single designation to be made, but in plural! That's how this canyon got it's name. It's not just the Barack. It's the Baracks. Plural. Because people who take selfies never take just one. (#truefact)

The current administration however, in its obvious desire to undo every single thing that President Obama did, directed the US Board of Geographic Names to change the name. Despite a revolt from @altUSBGN, the official agency relented and added an 'r' to the name, changing the meaning and denying the former president of his proclamation. There's no word yet if the monuments at the entrance to the canyon will be removed and repurposed along 'the wall'.

Despite not making the real news, I read all about this on Alex Jones' website and started my research from there. As it turns out, the president chose an area that's actually pretty cool!

Once the location was on our radar, 9L took the reins in planning and we set forth for an October trip. A couple of people who were planning to join us made up a variety of different mind-numbing excuses until we ended up with a perfect group of four.

Day 1: After setting up the easy shuttle, we got started Saturday morning with the easy road hike leading downstream. It was the first day of the deer/rifle season so we encountered a bit more traffic than is normal here. Lots of folks that don't look anything like deer were wearing bright orange. Apparently the hunters here are as blind as the voters! (HAZ :stp: smiley never coming back!)

We saw a few bighorn sheep along the river as well as some deer that had four legs and weren't wearing bright orange. Our first day was about 8 miles. The first 5 were along a 4x4 road that was open to OHVs of which we saw a handful. The last three miles was pristine river hiking.

After setting up camp we set off for an afternoon dayhike up Mineral Gulch. The first mile and a half is really cool and features a few typical Utah slot sections along with some more open areas. Farther up the landscape really opens up. We were hoping to get up to a canyon with some petroglyphs past Meadow Creek, but we were running out of daylight so we headed back to camp.

The first night I was in charge of the fictional campfire tale, which you can read as told in the first five paragraphs above.

Day 2: It was a chilly night and ice caked my shoes in the morning. We took our time waiting for the sun to warm things up a little before heading out on a short day two downstream. The river water was reported to be 43 degrees. :o The canyon narrowed and presented us with numerous amazing slots, bright red rock cliffs, and autumn-fired golden cottonwood leaves. We set up camp in under 6 miles and set out to explore more side canyons.

Poverty Wash was an absolute gem! Super narrow but still full of colorful flora, flowing water, dramatic geology, and an amazing little grotto at the end. This is an absolute must for anybody hiking past here!

I went back up the east fork a bit to French Canyon and headed up that one. It was super narrow and absolutely loaded with maple trees that were just past prime and littering the canyon in color. I reached the top in under half a mile, reaching a dead-end amphitheater of bright red sandstone cliffs.

Day 3: Monday we started early after a warmer night with the goal of getting home at a reasonable hour. The last three miles of the East Fork were even more stunning than the day before! More narrows, better color, higher cliffs. I had hopes of exploring Misery Canyon, but upon arrival we realized that this one would require swimming. It was early in the day and the water was colder than any of us wanted to go full monty on.

There were two guys camping there who had canyoneered down the day before. I had read that we could get upstream about a mile before reaching technical sections. This canyon looked amazing both from the mouth and from above on our climb out. I'd love to come back and explore this more.

Speaking of the climb out, we reached the Powell memorial plaque and the Parunuweap exit route after about two hours and began our ascent. We misjudged the difficulty of the next few miles back to the car. After a few days of cool autumn weather in a deep canyon, the sun and heat on the exposed rock and sand of the higher terrain was a big change of pace. It was still quite pleasant, maybe 75 degrees, but this is not something I would want to do during summer weather! While the views along the way are incredible, it's nearly 5 miles from the river back to the car and half of it is in nature's stairmaster ... sand! : rambo :

We shuttled back to the start and destroyed some mexican food in Kanab before making the long trip home. This one is on the list to do again! Thanks @volcanoCLMBR for the intro and @john9L for planning this one. It was good to hike with @zukerrach and Jared again. Honorable mention to @squatpuke for lunch and a side yard to pee in! :)
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Meteorology
Autumn - Color Foliage
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Moderate
Past prime to completely bare at the east end, prime to just past prime at the west end.

dry Meadow Creek Dry Dry
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Jul 02 2017
VolcanoCLMBR
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 Routes 1
 Photos 1,968
 Triplogs 422

40 male
 Joined Sep 16 2011
 Phoenix
The BarracksSouthwest, UT
Southwest, UT
Backpack avatar Jul 02 2017
VolcanoCLMBR
Backpack33.40 Miles 2,580 AEG
Backpack33.40 Miles3 Days         
2,580 ft AEG
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For some reason i had never made it to Zion NP before. Took monday july 3 off from work and headed north with some friends for the long weekend. The plan was to hike Angels landing on Saturday and backpack The Barracks (Parunuweap Canyon) sunday to tuesday.
The hike itself was stunning although it took til day 2 to start seeing all the good stuff along the Virgin River. The first 7 miles are uninteresting hiking mostly along a Forest Road that leads to some private ranches. We left the cars parked at Mt Carmel and started our adventure from there. Our first wildlife sighting came in the form of a rattlesnake along the road, along the rest of the weekend we saw five dead deer carcasses, it was definitely an area with plenty of game.
Our camp 1 was at the confluence of the Virgin River and Mineral Gulch. Water levels were very low along Mineral gulch, at about 1 or 1.5 miles into it the water completely dried off. We made it all the way to 7 Arch, we found a cave with some petroglyphs and another wall with some faded petroglyphs too.
After coming back from our day hike we broke down camp and made it another 4 miles down the Virgin river after day 2 totalling around 23 miles.
At this point we had already entered the most stunning parts of the Virgin River but the last four miles were simply the best and quite possibly rivaling the beauty of other more popular hikes inside Zion NP. Being off the beaten path was great, we did not see a single person until about five minutes before finishing the entire trip.
Our exit point was a fun class III climb. Route finding and climbing skills are must haves when exiting this place. From there we followed a general direction north with the help our our topo maps and our GPS. It was hot and exhausting, make sure you do refill your camelbaks as we had two people in our group run out of water.
If you or anyone else is not able to get Narrows permits i highly recommend this hike, its well worth it. A total hidden gem.
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May 09 2015
AZLOT69
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 Guides 175
 Routes 247
 Photos 7,463
 Triplogs 1,858

69 male
 Joined Feb 12 2002
 Gold Canyon, AZ
The BarracksSouthwest, UT
Southwest, UT
Hiking avatar May 09 2015
AZLOT69
Hiking8.50 Miles 688 AEG
Hiking8.50 Miles
688 ft AEG
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Nice canyon along the East Branch Virgin River. Rain, cold. No slots today.
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It's best for a man to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to open his mouth and remove all doubt.
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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