username
X
password
register help
GuidesRoutes
 
Photosets
 
 Comments
triplogs   photosets   labels comments more
Kalalau Trail to Kalalau Beach - 4 members in 8 triplogs have rated this an average 5 ( 1 to 5 best )
8 triplogs
  All Months
8 Triplogs
Jan
0
Feb
0
Mar
0
Apr
0
May
0
Jun
1
Jul
1
Aug
2
Sep
0
Oct
3
Nov
0
Dec
1
 

Dec 12 2017
ddgrunning
avatar

 Guides 2
 Routes 214
 Photos 4,003
 Triplogs 326

50 male
 Joined Apr 13 2011
 Gilbert, AZ
Kalalau Trail to Kalalau BeachKauai, HI
Kauai, HI
Backpack avatar Dec 12 2017
ddgrunning
Backpack29.65 Miles 8,513 AEG
Backpack29.65 Miles3 Days         
8,513 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
This was the highlight of a nine-day, 25th anniversary celebration trip for my wife and me. And wow, what an adventure!

We did several other hikes while on the island, but Kalalau Trail is definitely the crown jewel.

This was my first time to any of the islands, but I've known for a long time that Kauai was the island for hiking junkies, among which I proudly include myself. :D

Watching the weather forecast in the lead up to our trip had me convinced that the Kauai forecasters simply spin a wheel of options every hour or so and just plug in whatever it lands on--sunny, partly cloudy, overcast, rain, stormy, etc. And, after having spent some time there, that's probably a fairly accurate description, as it can be raining hard one minute, and then sunny skies are out 15 minutes later. Forecast aside, Kauai and rain are essentially synonymous (the center of the island gets an average of 30 FEET of rain per year), so you plan to get at least a little wet while you are there. That said, it's a bit more rainy in the "winter." The daytime highs were mid-70s, with nighttime lows in the upper 60s, and even when it rained it wasn't cold--just wet.

Ok, enough of the wind up ...

Day 1: Kalalau TH to Kalalau Beach + Side Trip to Hanakoa Falls (13 miles)

We arrived at the trailhead next to Ke'e beach shortly after sunrise and hit the trail around 7:15 a.m. Although the area had received rain over the previous few days, the first couple of hours of the hike were sunny and pleasant (albeit a bit humid--especially for us AZ types). The trail showed the evidence of the recent rains, as we were constantly navigating puddles and muddy sections.

Within the first 1/2 mile, the trail climbs to a lookout where the Na Pali coast opens up to view and the non-hiking tourists can get their social media snapshot without having to get their shoes too dirty .... :lol:

Two miles in, we came to Hanakapi'ai stream, which presents a frequent flash flood risk and can be very dangerous. Luckily, when we arrived the stream was calm and we were able to cross by rock-hopping and without getting wet. We briefly checked out the Hanakapi'ai beach area, though this time of year the surf is strong and the powerful waves ate up most of what typically is beach area in calmer times of the year. Watching the powerful waves crash in from various angles helped me understand why swimming in this area would be a very poor decision. Signs abound warning hikers not to do so and noting the deaths of many who have ignored that advice.

We briefly contemplated a side trip up to 300-ft Hanakapi'ai Falls (a popular four-mile round trip side excursion from the beach--and destination for most serious day-hikers), but ultimately decided against it, as we wanted to make sure we made it to Kalalau Beach before nightfall. Adding 4 more semi-bushwhacking miles would probably force us to camp at Hanakoa campground instead. So, we marched on.

Shortly after making the climb out of Hanakapi'ai valley, the rain set in and came down steadily for the next 2.5 hours. The result was a cornucopia of waterfalls, hundreds of feet tall, cascading down the lush, jagged mountainsides in every drainage we passed in and around. :y: :) By the time we reached Hanakoa Stream, six miles in, the rain had stopped, but the stream was swollen and turbid. That said, it wasn't too deep and looked passable, so we swapped out our hiking boots for "tabis" (basically shoes with a felt layer on the bottom that is amazingly effective in keeping you stable on otherwise slippery, wet rocks) and carefully made our way across. Having trekking poles was also very useful here (and in many other spots along the muddy and exposed trail).

After successfully traversing the stream, we again contemplated whether to make a side trip upstream to Hanakoa Falls. At 500 feet, Hanakoa is taller than Hanakapi'ai falls, but generally has a weaker flow. On the upside, it is only about a 1/2 mile side trip, so would only add about a mile to our overall hike on the day. Plus, with 2.5 hours of rain and what we saw in crossing the stream, we knew that "flow" would not be an issue.

We decided to go for it. We dropped our packs and ponchos and headed upstream on the use path. The stream below got more impressive as we climbed, with strong cascades all along the way. When we finally reached the falls, it was absolutely raging! Even though the rain had stopped by then, it was a mistake for us to leave our ponchos with our packs, as the spray from the bottom of the falls created a windy, horizontal rain storm (think: Niagara Falls) that made it impossible to get too close--and also made it very difficult to get any decent photos, as the camera lens would immediately be covered with droplets as soon as you raised it to take the shot. When I comb through my photos, I'll see if I was able to capture anything worth posting, but as with many views on this trip, the camera is simply inadequate capture the real-time experience.

After returning from the falls, we strapped the backpacks on and continued another mile before we descended to the exposed area about 7 miles in, known as "Crawler's Ledge"--a narrow strip of trail that traverses around a rocky outcropping, with the ocean crashing against the base of the cliff, 100 feet or so straight down. Given the rain and trail conditions, extra caution was in order here. I'm not particularly squeamish with heights, and found the tales of terror I had read about this section slightly overblown, but my wife on the the other hand didn't particularly enjoy this section :scared: --and, in parts, she helped it live up to its name.

After successfully traversing Crawler's Ledge, I made the mistake of telling her that I thought that the really exposed sections were now behind us. Oops. :-$ As it turned out, the trail over the ensuing mile and a half was, in my view, more sketchy--involving several stretches where the muddy, 12 to 15-inch trail sloped towards sheer drops to the ocean hundreds of feet below, and was washed out in spots here and there. Again, I didn't find it particularly un-nerving, but can understand why others (my wife included) get a little jittery. That said, she managed like a champ : rambo : , but was glad when we arrived at the famous "Big Red Hill" around mile 9.5, where the trail opens up and descends rapidly (but with no sketchy drop offs) back towards the ocean.

At the bottom of the Big Red Hill is a relatively flat, grassy "meadow" area that fronts the ocean. We came across a herd(?) of about 40 billy goats out for a late afternoon frolic. Kind of a cool sight. From there, it was one more stream crossing and a relatively flat, but muddy, hike along the shoreline to the campground.

We arrived shortly before dark and set up camp right at the edge of the beach, near the waterfall that provides fresh water and a "shower" for campground visitors. The waves on Kalalau Beach were incredible, with 20+ foot swells crashing into the beach and into each other--one on top of the other. The sight and thunderous sound were mesmerizing, and entertained us throughout the evening.

As the tide came in, we realized that our prime, beach-front campsite might be a little too prime. :doh: So, just as nightfall set in, we made a decision to relocate to higher ground. Turned out to be a good call, as we could tell in the morning that the high mark of the tide would have lapped up against our tent.

Day 2--Day Hike up Kalalau Valley. (5.4 miles)

After a great night's rest and the unusual (for us) backpacking experience of sleeping in, we prepared for a day hike up into the Kalalau Valley. As we were eating breakfast, a young orthodox Jewish couple from Ohio approached us looking for one of the locals, who purportedly could arrange for a boat to come in an ferry out folks who were prepared to pay a pretty penny. They were exhausted and didn't think they could make it back--and were prepared with the requisite pretty penny. Unfortunately, given the size of the surf, there was no way any boat was coming for several days, so we offered them some Excedrin/ibuprofen and a shot of encouragement and sent them on their way.

The day hike up Kalalau Valley was delightful. Along the way, we checked out the sprawling and lush "garden" that the illegal residents maintain, and it truly is amazing, with several terraces, streams, and pools throughout. In the center of the Garden is a very large/tall tree-of-life-esque tree that completes the "Garden of Eden" picture. The locals have installed a climbing rope that allows them to climb up into its lofty branches--a lookout perhaps for patrolling rangers? At the base of the tree we found several modern gardening implements.

On our way to the Garden, we crossed paths with a couple of friendly "residents" (they tell you that they simply "vacation here often"), who offered us a stalk of freshly cut sugar cane and pointed out some wild orange trees where we could shake some fruit loose from the high limbs. I'd never had fresh sugar cane--pretty cool, and the oranges were absolutely delicious--not sure what variety they were, but different from anything I've had here in AZ or on the mainland.

After our side trip to the Garden, we made our way to the Big Pool, which marks the "end" of the official trail. We enjoyed the rope swing and swimming, made our way back down the valley.

After returning to camp, we found out that the rangers had helicoptered in while we were out, causing the locals to scatter into hiding. Apparently, the rangers were going to return the following day. I spoke with one of the locals who keeps several tents and simply relocates from one camping area to another camping area, setting up different tents each time to avoid suspicion. He called it a necessary cat-and-mouse game. He claimed he owned a construction business, but comes out to Kalalau when there is a big break between jobs. He mentioned a multi-millionaire named Don who comes out every October for a month and goes around offering coffee every morning and popcorn every evening to whoever is in camp. Kind of surreal ....

Other than food from the Garden, our local said he gets plenty to live off of from what he called the "offering table," which is a table located (ironically) next to the government shack at the far end of the campground, where backpackers unload food and other items they don't want to pack out. On the day we left, there was a full, glass bottle of salad dressing. Who backpacked that in?!! :doh:

Day 3 Kalalau Beach back to the TH (11 mi.)

The forecast was for high winds (50 mph gusts) on the day of our hike out, so we got an early start, hoping to get past the exposed sections and Crawler's Ledge before the winds whipped up. We did catch some gusts mid-morning that made some of the trail a little more tricky, but managed fine. By the time we got to Crawler's Ledge, the winds had died down substantially. In fact, as my wife finished off Crawler's Ledge on the return, and I congratulated her, she said: "Was that the section that almost made me cry on the way over?" I confirmed, and she said: "I did awesome!" Yes, honey, yes you did. :app: :app:

The rest of the return was uneventful--as long as you define "uneventful" as: incredibly amazing views of soaring knife-edged mountains, jungle in every shade of green, crystal blue ocean garnished with the famous "North Shore" surf crashing against the cliffs below, and the sights and sounds of tropical forest an in and around every turn in the trail.

After arriving at the trailhead, rinsing off muddy shoes and legs, and slipping into my Oofos sandals--aka "victory shoes"--we headed into Hanalei for some well-deserved, and delicious Hawaiian shave ice. Perfect way to cap off a magical trip in paradise.

My wife frequently reminds me that going on adventurous trips like this is a true sign of her love for me. I can't disagree! Gotta love a woman like that! :y: :DANCE: :yr:

To all who read through this entire triplog--man, you are true die-hards! Congratulations! :lol: :lol:
_____________________
1 archive
Oct 22 2016
chumley
avatar

 Guides 78
 Routes 679
 Photos 14,834
 Triplogs 1,534

47 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Hiking Kauai, HI 
Hiking Kauai, HI
 
Walk / Tour avatar Oct 22 2016
chumley
Walk / Tour
Walk / Tour
 no routes
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Figured I'd put a few overall notes down for anybody planning on a trip to Kauai for hiking.

Travel:
You can fly direct to Lihue (LIH) from Phoenix (PHX). There are two flights daily and both return as red-eyes. I found the prices to be best during the week. Lower prices seemed to be available with connections in LAX, SFO, or HNL. But the connections made the 6.5 hour trip significantly longer with most connections being 3+ hours.

Rental Car:
All the major agencies rent at the Lihue Airport. There is poor public transport on the island and the few cabs are very expensive. A rental car is almost required. The good thing is it's a small island and you can't really rack up many miles, so the rates are quite reasonable. I rented through Costco for under $200 for the week.

Food and Supplies:
There is a Walmart in Lihue (but not a supercenter) and a Costco (which has the cheapest gas on the island). Gas ranged from about 50¢ to $1 more than in Phoenix. There are three places I know of that sell fuel canisters for your backpacking stove (isobutane/propane mix)--because you can't bring these on the plane. ACE Hardware in Lihue, Napali Kayak Tours in Hanalei, and Kayak Kauai in Wailua. We got ours at ACE and it was only $6. It was some South Korean brand but worked just fine.

There are several Safeway stores in the various towns as well as another full-service grocery chain called Big Save. Both offer all the staples you need. Your Safeway discount card works there. If you shop at Big Save you should sign up for their discount card. We also enjoyed the fresh deli selections at the local Ishikara market in Waimea on the way to Koke'e and Waimea Canyon.

Weather:
It will rain while you are on Kauai. It's a rainy place. But except on the mountain, showers are usually brief. Most rain actually falls at night! The old volcano that makes the high-point of Kauai, Wai'ale'ale is 5100 feet in elevation, and the rain gauge there is often cited as the wettest place on earth. In some months it receives over 50 inches of rain, and averages 450+ inches of rain annually. Just 18 miles west of there on Polihale Beach, the average rainfall is just 8 inches. See this [ photo ] . Trade winds blow from the northeast so that side of the island receives more rain. It is all squeezed out by the mountains and the south and west coasts of the island are nearly dry. Depending on the strength of the trades and the available moisture, you may choose to hike one side of the island or the other on certain days if you have flexibility.

Camping:
There are state parks and county parks which allow camping. The county parks are all on beaches and offer camping at $3 per night per person. Permits can be purchased by mail in advance, but I would just get them in person at any of a number of locations. See their website for campground locations as well as the locations where you can pick up permits. Pay attention to the limited hours for the permit offices: kauai.gov/camping

Haena Beach Park, Anini Beach and Salt Pond are the three best county camping beaches. All have restrooms, sinks, and outdoor cold beach showers.

The state park campgrounds are $18/night up to 6 people. Koke'e is a beautiful campground that may sell out on weekends. Weekdays rarely sell out and would not need to be reserved in advance. It has developed campsites with a grill and spigot in each plus bathrooms and cold showers.

There are four primitive campsites in Waimea Canyon that we passed on our day hike there. All are basic with a rain shelter, picnic table, fire ring, and a composting toilet. As a tourist and visitor, I would get a permit if I planned to stay at any of them, but I'd be shocked locals ever buy a permit here. There's just not much use. The other sites in the mountains are also primitive and rarely visited. The final site is on the west coast at Polihale State Park. It's Hawaii's longest beach and getting here requires a 5-mile drive on a rutted dirt road that voids your rental car contract. :)

State Park camping can be reserved online. I was able to do it on my phone and never printed the actual permit. See: camping.ehawaii.gov/

Roosters:
In 1992, Hurricane Iniki hit Kauai square with 145-mph winds. The US Navy radar station up near Koke'e recorded 227mph before it was destroyed. :o So what does that have to do with anything? Yeah, so a chicken farm was destroyed in the hurricane freeing all the chickens. Now 25 years later, the island is innundated with chickens. They have no predator and they are everywhere. This isn't really a problem except if you are trying to sleep outside. For some reason these are the dumbest birds known to man and will begin their morning cockadoodledoos at 2 or 3am. Bring the best earplugs you can buy. You will need them! (The exception being the Na Pali coast where I believe the permanent residents effectively manage the population in the most delicious way possible :-$ ).

Kalalau Trail / Napali Coast:
Camping permits for this trail are $20pp/night and are available from the State Park website above. Unlike the others, this one sells out in advance. It is limited to 60 people per night and you are limited to a 5-night stay. I would recommend a minimum of 2 nights. If you wish to explore either of the two waterfall trails on the way to Na Pali a 3rd or 4th night are nearly required. We didn't manage to visit either waterfall due to our 2-night stay not providing the time for it. (Hanakapi'ai Falls and Hanakoa Falls).

Other Hiking Trails:
There are a bunch of other hikes on the island, but I would recommend the ridge line hikes from Koke'e State Park toward the Napali Coast. The views are phenomenal. Waimea Canyon is amazing, but some of the best views are enjoyed from the short viewpoint hikes rather than descending all the way to the bottom. I found this book to be a useful resource as it focuses much more on hiking and other outdoor recreation than other all-encompassing guidebooks. amazon.com/Kauai-Tr ... zona

See reports of my hikes here:
Sleeping Giant
Nualolo Awaawapuhi
Waimea Canyon to Lonomea Camp
Secret Falls
Kalalau Trail

This was one of the most memorable trips I've been on and I can't recommend it enough to others who enjoy outdoor recreation. (I hear there are nice resorts on the island for people who just want to sit by the beach and lounge, but this is a hiking website! :) )
Named place
Named place
Kokee State Park
Meteorology
Meteorology
Sunset
_____________________
Championing breakfast since 1994.
2 archives
Oct 16 2016
chumley
avatar

 Guides 78
 Routes 679
 Photos 14,834
 Triplogs 1,534

47 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Kalalau Trail to Kalalau BeachKauai, HI
Kauai, HI
Backpack avatar Oct 16 2016
chumley
Backpack28.77 Miles 7,727 AEG
Backpack28.77 Miles3 Days         
7,727 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
clairebear
Jabreme
John9L
Probably the best backpacking trip I have ever been on! :y:

My friends Jane and Luke got Maui'd but had a family-only ceremony so there was no way I would turn down an invitation to their backpacking honeymoon. After all, the Na Pali Coast is one of the most scenic and iconic stretches of coast on Earth, featured in dozens of movies, tv shows, etc. The 4000 foot peaks surround a stunning beach and valley that is inaccessible except to those willing to make the 11-mile journey by foot along a trail that is equally challenging as it is scenic.

Big thanks to John and Claire for signing up for this one and putting up with my slack planning early on. With a full week on the island, we managed to cover a lot of miles in a variety of settings, but the Kalalau Trail was, of course, the highlight of the trip. Hell, it was the highlight of all trips!

We started out a couple hours after the others since I figured that an 11-mile hike couldn't be too bad. While we did catch up with them just before arriving at camp, this hike is an absolute ass-kicker. It took us 7 hours to make it those 11 miles, and that was with perfect weather and totally dry trail conditions. The trail has a lot of up and down, rising from sea level to about 800 feet and back down, dipping in and out of various valleys. Claire once commented it was like the Tonto Trail ... another drainage to cross ... a zipline would be so much easier! :)

While the ups and downs, ins and outs took their toll, the views along the way are nothing short of incredible. With year-round temps around 80, and pleasant trade winds providing cool breezes, the weather was perfect. It can (and does) rain here frequently, but we had the good fortune of having a dry hike to camp.

Mile 7 features the most challenging terrain, including a feature called "crawlers ledge". There's a set of switchbacks that descend a loose scree slope (I lost my footing :scared: but fell safely on my ass). That probably didn't instill any confidence in those following me. Next the trail traverses a narrow cut along a cliff a few hundred feet above a violent ocean below. It's mostly mental, but sure is easy to get in your head! (I think Backpacker has it listed as top 10 most dangerous hikes in the world.)

After the cliff section there are a couple of cuts across eroded slopes of loose red volcanic sand. A bit reminiscent of the Nankoweap Trail, but something about the ocean below makes for a different looking mind :pk: than those we usually deal with here in the desert. : rambo :

Eventually the trail makes the final descent into the Kalalau Valley, crossing a picturesque stream before reaching the beach. A large camping area in the shaded forest adjacent to the beach provides ideal camping conditions, and two composting toilets help keep this popular location mostly clean. A waterfall at the far end of the beach is great for showering and getting drinking water.

The Kalalau Valley features dozens of "outlaws": people who live here full time. Technically you are not permitted to stay more than 7 days and must have a permit. From time to time, the residents here are rounded up and removed, but they just come back. They've actually got a pretty good setup and all those we encountered were friendly and helpful. Apparently if you carry in cigarettes you have a valuable currency. Fires are not permitted, but the locals are usually burning something, and hot coffee was offered in the morning! :y:

On Monday we did an easy dayhike through the valley exploring the multitude of use trails. The two main trails lead to Big Pool and Outlaw Pool -- two nice spots for swimming. Big Pool features a rope swing below two picturesque cascades and is highly recommended as a destination. The hike upstream from Outlaw Pool was an outstanding journey along a stream of endless cascades, waterfalls, and swimming holes. The gem of the valley however, is Community Garden. At least an acre in size it is a wilderness farm maintained by those who live here illegally. It is absolutely gorgeous! Bananas, avocados, peppers, tarot, potatoes, and a bunch of other things provide easy sustenance all year long.

The ocean at Kalalau Beach has dangerous rip currents and shore break making swimming difficult. Most of us managed to get in about waist deep but didn't risk going farther. There's a scenic cave at the far end of the beach, with sea water that you can swim through to a sandbar in the deep, dark end. The beach is an amazing place for sunset, and the night moonlight was pretty cool too! 8)

Tuesday we started early on the long 11-mile hike back, again taking 7 hours. This time the weather slowed us as it rained for a few hours on the last 6 miles creating treacherous conditions with slippery footing with mud and leaves. I was happy to have my trekking poles and would recommend them to anybody who makes this trip. Luckily the rain was light and there was no problem crossing any of the flood-prone streams.

Finally back at the car, we made plans to meet up with the others later, and all headed our separate ways, with many more Kauai adventures planned in the days ahead.

I really can't recommend this hike enough. It's among the best.
Fauna
Fauna
Domestic Goat
Meteorology
Meteorology
Rainbow Sunset

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Hanakapiai Stream Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Hanakoa Stream Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Ho'ole'a Falls Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Hoolulu Stream Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Kalalau Stream Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Waiahuakua Stream Light flow Light flow
_____________________
Championing breakfast since 1994.
Oct 16 2016
John9L
avatar

 Guides 6
 Routes 173
 Photos 5,029
 Triplogs 1,631

male
 Joined Mar 12 2004
 Scottsdale, AZ
Kalalau Trail to Kalalau BeachKauai, HI
Kauai, HI
Backpack avatar Oct 16 2016
John9L
Backpack28.26 Miles 7,644 AEG
Backpack28.26 Miles3 Days         
7,644 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
chumley
clairebear
Jabreme
This trip started with Chumley saying one of his friends was getting married in Hawaii and was then spending a few days backpacking the Kalalau Trail. We were all invited for the backpacking portion. The weeks and months flew by and Chumley procrastinated on buying the airfare to Kauai. I wasn’t sure if we were actually going two weeks beforehand but then Chumley finally came through and bought the plane tickets. This will be my first backpacking trip I’m flying to so that presented a new challenge on how to pack and other logistics.

We flew out of Phoenix on Saturday afternoon and had a direct flight to Kauai that lasted about six hours. We landed and picked up our rental car and made it to Ace Hardware right before they closed and bought fuel. From there it was over to Safeway for food and then on to our hostel at the Kauai Beach House Hostel. The time change was three hours back and I was sleeping by 10pm.

Our first full day started fairly early as I woke up around 5am and watched the sunrise over the Pacific Ocean. The three of us started slow as we packed up and then started the hour drive to the north side of the island stopping for some breakfast along the way. We started hiking around 8:45am and headed up the Kalalau Trail. There were quite a few people on the first two miles as the trail makes a moderate climb. We eventually dropped down to Hanakapi’ai Beach and took a break at this wonderful beach. Most of the day hikers hike up Hanakapi’ai Falls but we don’t have the time.

After our break we made the solid climb up the trail and continued our traverse as a light rain fell. We kept at it and took a lunch break at mile 6 which features a camp, stream and nasty toilet. From there it’s easy going for a mile until the ledges. The trail wraps around the cliff edge overlooking the Pacific Ocean. The drop will kill you and every step counts. I felt it was more challenging going this way because some of it was downhill on a steep and loose trail. I was glad when we finally got away from the cliff edge and made the final descent to Kalalau Beach. Right before hitting the beach we ran into Jane and Luke and their friends. We selected a prime campsite right at the start of the camping area. We spent the rest of the day exploring the beach and admiring sunset. This place is just spectacular and all of us were in heaven! It was a great first day!

Day two started very slow for us. Our group of eight took our time in camp as we ate breakfast and discussed the options for the day. We would day hike up canyon and explore some pools. The going was fairly easy as we gained elevation and eventually hit the deep pools where we spent an hour swimming and relaxing. It’s a beautiful day and life was good. Afterward we headed back down canyon and checked out the Community Garden the locals maintain. It’s in amazing condition with irrigation and several composting piles. The locals won’t go hungry! The rest of our day was spent relaxing in camp and exploring the beach and the caves on the far west side. I heard scenes from Pirates of the Caribbean have been shot here. This is such a magical place it’s perfect for the movies!

Jane and Luke and company woke very early on Day three. They wanted to get an early start for the hike out. Chumley, Claire and myself started over an hour after them. The first few miles make a solid climb and then the ledges were up next. We took our time as we carefully worked our way across. I found them to be much easier on the hike out because there wasn’t as much downhill. We also had ideal conditions as it was sunny and dry at the moment. Once through we all took another break at the six mile camp. From there it was a grind back to the two mile mark at Hanakapi’ai Beach where we caught up with the rest of our group. The last two miles were very wet & muddy as it rained almost the entire time. I was very glad to arrive back to the rental car and the end this trip. Our plan was to head back to the hostel and then more hiking later in the week.

The Kalalau Trail is just spectacular! The views are epic right from the start and the trail is a modern marvel. There are long stretches where you’re right on the cliff edge but don’t notice due to all the vegetation. The exposed cliffs are a rush but aren’t too bad if you take your time and keep a cool head. Besides that the rest of the group was a lot of fun and I’m glad we got to be a small part in Jane & Luke’s honeymoon. Thanks Chumley for putting this together and I look forward to a trip to the Big Island maybe next year!!!
_____________________
2 archives
Jun 07 2016
MikeS
avatar

 Photos 99
 Triplogs 866

male
 Joined Mar 18 2012
 Goodyear, AZ
Kalalau Trail to Kalalau BeachKauai, HI
Kauai, HI
Backpack avatar Jun 07 2016
MikeS
Backpack38.40 Miles 15,225 AEG
Backpack38.40 Miles4 Days         
15,225 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
The Kalalau Trail along the Na Pali Coast in Kauai is the best trail I have ever been on. An amazing experience that I can not put into words. My video below explains it much better than words ever could, enjoy. Loved it.

https://youtu.be/Zp ... goXM
_____________________
Subscribe to my adventure videos at: [ youtube video ]

Follow my adventures on Instagram at: adventures_az
1 archive
Aug 21 2015
Lucyan
avatar

 Routes 1
 Photos 17,685
 Triplogs 906

40 female
 Joined Jan 18 2011
 In the Wild
Kalalau Trail to Kalalau BeachKauai, HI
Kauai, HI
Backpack avatar Aug 21 2015
Lucyan
Backpack22.00 Miles 5,000 AEG
Backpack22.00 Miles
5,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Island paradise, hidden beaches, wild coastline...
The difficulty of this trail and remote location of Kalalau Valley make this a pristine nature experience off the beaten trail. Some say that the Na Pali is one of the most beautiful coastlines in the world. The trail traverses 5 valleys (ie-constantly going up and down for a total elevation gain/loss of 5,000') before ending at Kalalau Beach where it is blocked by sheer cliffs. The 11 mile trail ( + 5 miles of optional side trails to see water falls) is graded, almost never level as it crosses above towering sea cliffs and through lush valleys. The trail drops to sea level at the beaches of Hanakapi’al and Kalalau. Trail conditions may range from muddy puddles to dry, crumbly rock near cliff’s edge. Eroding cliffs and big surf sometimes take out small sections of trail. Rated “9” out of “10” in difficulty by the Sierra Club.
Culture
Culture
Campsite
Meteorology
Meteorology
Sunset
_____________________
2 archives
Jul 24 2014
MikeS
avatar

 Photos 99
 Triplogs 866

male
 Joined Mar 18 2012
 Goodyear, AZ
Kalalau Trail to Kalalau BeachKauai, HI
Kauai, HI
Backpack avatar Jul 24 2014
MikeS
Backpack29.00 Miles 11,800 AEG
Backpack29.00 Miles3 Days         
11,800 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Amazing backpack trip on the Napali Coast on Kauai, HI via the Kalalau Trail. Backpacked in with wife on Thursday, hiked around the Valley on Friday and out on Saturday. Tough trail with amazing unmatched views. This should be a must on everyone's bucket list.
_____________________
Subscribe to my adventure videos at: [ youtube video ]

Follow my adventures on Instagram at: adventures_az
Aug 30 1991
mazatzal
avatar

 Routes 33
 Photos 2,273
 Triplogs 1,125

63 male
 Joined Jul 28 2004
 Scottsdale, AZ
Kalalau Trail to Hanakapi'ai FallsKauai, HI
Kauai, HI
Hiking avatar Aug 30 1991
mazatzal
Hiking10.00 Miles 1,308 AEG
Hiking10.00 Miles
1,308 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
We took the Kalalu trail to Hanakapai Falls and back. We got soaked in a rainstorm :lol:
After that we went to a few beaches on this side Kee, Haena and Lumahai. The surf was high at Lumahai.
_____________________
4 archives

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

help comment issue

end of page marker