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Nov 24 2016
AZHiker456
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 Guides 28
 Routes 197
 Photos 7,418
 Triplogs 184

38 female
 Joined Nov 07 2015
 
Mustang Mountains High Point 6469Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 24 2016
AZHiker456
Hiking5.55 Miles 1,558 AEG
Hiking5.55 Miles   4 Hrs   7 Mns   1.39 mph
1,558 ft AEG      7 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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The Mustang Mountains Highpoint has been tempting me since I moved in to my new home in Elgin just under a month ago. It is the first thing I see when I look out the window where my desk is, [and even when not looking out the window, it’s very noticeable out of my peripheral vision, being under 4 air miles from my front door]. Needless to say, it was the unquestionable summit of choice for my first hike in the Mustang Mountains.

Before hitting up the peak however, I made a slight detour to check out something I spotted from satellite imagery while planning my route, which looked rather bizarre to me. My best guesses were: a very large piece of airplane, vehicle, or other type of metal wreckage, some sort of water tank [or the remains of one], a dam, or the foundation of an old building/other structure. It proved to be a dam, and a rather neat one [built back in 1955], as I noted in the Description.

Although the ground visibility was much better on this adventure than my previous one, there were still a few stretches, [the final part of the ascent / beginning part of the descent from the peak] were the footing was *horrendous, [*at least in terms of high potential to twist / break an ankle]. Go figure, my first two hikes back to action would be ones with this kind of footing. Nonetheless, I made it back once again in one piece, without taking a single misstep, and I had a wicked good time.

I was tempted to do an ‘up and over’ type of route [i.e. up the peak’s Northern ridgeline and down via the badass, craggy-looking S/SE ridgeline; but the bee that “greeted” me, [and then “escorted” me the final 100 feet to the summit], did not exactly give me a warm welcome. And given the fact that I was alone, still in the recovery process from multiple injuries, and not even 100% certain if the fun-looking rock crags would suddenly turn to shear cliff, I decided to play it safe and opted for an out-and-back.

I’d noticed the second dam sometime during my ascent/descent, and it was practically right on the way I needed to go to get back to my vehicle. Unlike the first one, [which had no water on either side], this one had a large pool of water on one side. It made for some really awesome distance photos and was fun the check out. I’d actually noticed this dam as well on satellite imagery but hadn’t way-pointed it since it didn’t look as interesting [kind of looked like a black hole, which I guessed was either water or a mine].
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average hiking speed 1.39 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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