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Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7 - 18 members in 36 triplogs have rated this an average 4.6 ( 1 to 5 best )
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36 triplogs
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Mar 26 2022
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 Guides 12
 Routes 60
 Photos 1,225
 Triplogs 900

48 male
 Joined Apr 30 2008
 Tucson, AZ
Aravaipa CanyonGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Canyoneering avatar Mar 26 2022
azdesertfatherTriplogs 900
Canyoneering9.70 Miles 427 AEG
Canyoneering9.70 Miles   5 Hrs   33 Mns   2.28 mph
427 ft AEG   1 Hour   18 Mns Break35 LBS Pack
 no routes
Partners none no partners
Hiked out from Hells Hole Canyon to the western trailhead. Before leaving camp we had two large turkeys near us making a bunch of noise! Later in the morning ran into a large one, bigger than some of the kids with us. Ran into a good sized pack of coatis as well. The pack of fathers and sons did great coming out, despite having done 10 miles the day before. It was amazing watching the cottonwood fuzz falling from the trees; a wind would blow through the canyon and it looked like a snowstorm of white. Some places the ground was literally covered with white. Beautiful time of year to experience Aravaipa!
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
"I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived." — Henry David Thoreau
Mar 25 2022
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 Guides 12
 Routes 60
 Photos 1,225
 Triplogs 900

48 male
 Joined Apr 30 2008
 Tucson, AZ
Aravaipa CanyonGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Canyoneering avatar Mar 25 2022
azdesertfatherTriplogs 900
Canyoneering9.70 Miles 686 AEG
Canyoneering9.70 Miles   5 Hrs   45 Mns   1.85 mph
686 ft AEG      30 Mns Break35 LBS Pack
 no routes
Partners none no partners
Led a group of 10 in for a 2 day. Started around 9:15, arriving just after 3pm. Day 1 we started at the western TH and made it to Hells Hole Canyon, where we camped for the night on a little bluff above the creek. We saw a deer, a turkey, and several fish up to maybe 8” in length. Lots of kids of various ages, so lots of time resting and waiting for them to catch up to ensure we had everyone, but no problems other than Jeremiah stepping barefoot on a bee at camp and having a swollen foot from his allergy to bee stings.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
"I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived." — Henry David Thoreau
Apr 24 2021
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 2,451
 Triplogs 142

37 male
 Joined Mar 01 2018
 Chandler, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 24 2021
John10sTriplogs 142
Hiking14.37 Miles 1,201 AEG
Hiking14.37 Miles   6 Hrs   53 Mns   2.27 mph
1,201 ft AEG      34 Mns Break
 
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TboneKathy
Route Scout Route Recorded  on Route Scout Popup | MapDEX
This was our third third trip to Aravaipa in the past six months--the first was in late October, exploring Horse Camp Canyon from the west trailhead [ triplog ] , and the second was two weeks later, when we hiked to Turkey Creek and Hell's Hole Canyon from the east trailhead [ triplog ] . I was excited to visit Aravaipa in the spring, though I was a little worried that I was setting my expectations too high after two fantastic previous visits, when we were lucky to see a lot of great wildlife. But this trip was certainly no letdown.

The drive to the trailhead along Klondike Road was fast and easy--it's well graded, and we were driving 55+ mph on the smooth straightaways. We didn't have the fall colors this time, of course, but there was plenty of green, the water level was about the same as before, the weather was perfect, and the water temperature was refreshingly cool. We didn't see many other people early on--there was a group of backpackers in the parking lot packing up, but we only saw a handful of hikers/campers the rest of the day, until we got back near the parking lot in the afternoon.

Our destination today was Booger Canyon, but since this was a day trip, it's a 3+ hour drive from Phoenix, and Booger is almost seven miles from the east trailhead, I knew we wouldn't have too much time to explore, but we wanted to check it out. Our first wildlife sighting was some wild turkeys early on, including a large one fanning its feathers. We also had multiple Great Blue Herons flying overhead, and one finally landed so we could get some good pictures.

I hadn't hiked west of Hell's Hole Canyon from the east side, and the geology and landscape change quickly after Hell's Hole--the canyon gets wider, the walls are a darker red/brown, and there are a lot more saguaros that extend far down the sides of the canyon. Around five miles in, we hit the jackpot on wildlife...probably because we were getting closer to the middle of the canyon where there's less foot traffic. In the span of one mile, we saw a deer, more Great Blue Herons, and had two separate coati sightings. We were lucky enough to see two large groups of coatis at the end of our last visit, and this time we saw two individuals at different points along the trail. The first one climbed head-first down a tree as we approached and then eventually moved up the side of the canyon. The two we saw today looked a little different than the ones we saw last time--they had bushier tails, were lighter brown, and didn't have the same prominent rings on their tails.

As expected, we didn't have much time to explore Booger, but we enjoyed what little we saw. The canyon is full of massive boulders, and despite the dry year, a lot of the pools were full, with some small trickles and waterfalls throughout. It felt like an obstacle course as we navigated the jumble of boulders. Others have mentioned in trip logs that they preferred exploring Hell's Hole to Booger...they're very different, but I found Booger just as intriguing, and it's worthy of a return visit to get further back toward the springs--we only got a small taste of Booger today, and when it comes to side canyons of Aravaipa, it's one of my top picks.

On the hike out, we saw a few more Great Blue Herons and wild turkeys...and a few more groups of people as we got closer to the trailhead. We also noticed a large natural window in the rock that we'd somehow missed on the way in. The hike managed to live up to the high expectations, and by the end of the day, we'd seen ~10 wild turkeys, six or seven Great Blue Herons, a deer, and the two coatis.
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Old Rusty Stuff
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Booger Canyon

dry Booger Canyon Dry Dry
Full pools with some trickles in the waterfalls

dry Deer Creek Dry Dry
water report recorded in the field on our app Route Scout Dry at the intersection with Aravaipa Creek
Mar 30 2021
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 Guides 3
 Routes 13
 Photos 231
 Triplogs 15

male
 Joined Sep 27 2020
 Tucson, AZ
Aravaipa CanyonGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Mar 30 2021
andrewpTriplogs 15
Backpack11.00 Miles 1,600 AEG
Backpack11.00 Miles3 Days         
1,600 ft AEG
 
no photosets
Partners none no partners
This was my second trip to Aravaipa this month and this time it was with the purpose of taking my nephew on his first backpacking trip. I couldn't believe the number of people we ran into, especially on the first day!

Day 1

We started from the west trailhead around 9:00am and proceeded to find our way up the creek. My nephew insisted on wearing a heavy pair of boots so we ended up looking for land routes rather than pushing through the water. Overall the hike in went fine and although this was his first experience hiking with any real weight he's a strong kid and did really well.

We encountered a couple of groups on the way in who appeared to be culling the non-native fish population. These crews were a common encounter throughout the trip and although we only saw then a few times it seemed like we could always hear the beeping of the equipment they were using to shock the fish.

The plan was to setup camp at one of the sites near Horse Camp and then spend the rest of the afternoon exploring in the area. The problem was that all three of those sites were taken. After the disappointment at Horse Camp we continued upstream with the intention of snagging one of the sites near Booger Canyon. Got to the first site and someone was already camped there. Found someone at the second site and chatted with him for a bit. His group ran into the same issue that we did and he and his buddy were scouting ahead for a larger group of 4 or 5 people. He was sitting on this camp while his buddy fetched the rest of the group.

I could tell that my nephew was running out of steam and I was starting to get concerned. I knew of a couple more sites further upstream, but that would put is in a crappy place for the exploring that we wanted to do the next day, plus it would make the hike out that much longer. We found a place to park and I went looking for a spot in the area.

I eventually found a "meh" site a little farther upstream and went back to fetch my nephew. As we started upstream something caught my eye on the north bank and I ran across to investigate. Ended up finding a nice secluded site just east of the entrance to Booger Canyon. As a bonus it was very sheltered from the wind which was really picking up. Finally dropped our packs and setup camp.

Day 2

Woke up with the sun after my first-ever night in a hammock and felt more rested than I ever have after a night outdoors. This hammock thing may be a game-changer for me. We eased into the day with some breakfast and prepared to check out Booger Canyon.

Our original agenda was to do Horse Camp and Virgus, but being right next door to Booger caused us to change up our plans. Booger was a great spot for some scrambling and boulder-hopping with each level higher more interesting and beautiful than the one below. We got about 3/4 mile in and hit a wall (literally). I knew it was possible to go farther, but I was concerned that after getting up over the waterfall we would have trouble getting back down. Not wanting to have to explain to my sister how things went bad I decided to call it before we ran out of talent. We were bummed to turn around but that quickly faded when we had a bit of trouble finding a path down an obstacle. Ultimately, we made it out without incident, but it underlined how going down can present a completely different set of challenges than climbing up.

In the afternoon we trekked downstream to Horse Camp and explored the canyon up to the horse shoe-shaped pool and fall. There was no way we were going to get any farther, but the journey up to that point was incredible. I couldn't believe how the canyon had been completely washed free of all debris and imagined the force of water required to do that. This was much easier to navigate than Booger and made for a fun afternoon.

Day 3

The wind really started blowing around 4 am and stayed with us for the rest of the day. It made breaking camp a pretty annoying process but we took it slow and managed to be back on the trail around 10:30am. The trip back to the trailhead was uneventful and we stopped a lot to appreciate the canyon and take more photos. Back to the car by 2pm and home just before 4pm.


I was honestly surprised at how much greener the canyon was compared to a couple of weeks ago. I was hoping to see a bit more wildlife but I think that all of the activity in the canyon caused a lot of the fauna to lay low. Between the fish crew and other hikers I think I counted 30 people the first day and most of them were making a lot of noise.

Ultimately, we did see a large flock of water birds (not sure what) near Horse Camp. I startled pack of coati on Tuesday when looking for a campsite and a single straggler visited us in camp on Wednesday. We encountered a number of tree frogs in Booger and could hear them in the evening from our campsite. On the way out we saw a pair of white-tailed deer as well. The creatures that we encountered most were caterpillars. They were everywhere - from massive nests on the trees to individuals on what seemed like every surface. I can't imaging what butterfly season looks like in the canyon.

I doubt that I'll make it back to Aravaipa this summer, but I'm looking forward to planning a trip in the fall.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Booger Canyon Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Booger Creek Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Horse Camp Canyon Pools to trickle Pools to trickle

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Javalina Canyon Light flow Light flow
Mar 10 2021
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 Guides 3
 Routes 13
 Photos 231
 Triplogs 15

male
 Joined Sep 27 2020
 Tucson, AZ
Aravaipa CanyonGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Mar 10 2021
andrewpTriplogs 15
Backpack31.86 Miles 1,603 AEG
Backpack31.86 Miles2 Days   3 Hrs   57 Mns   
1,603 ft AEG
 
no photosets
Partners none no partners
I've wanted to backpack Aravaipa for a long time and the planets finally aligned for me to be able to go. This is an amazing place and even though I spent three days there I only saw a fraction of it. Fortunately, I'm heading back in a couple of weeks to take my nephew there on his first backpacking trip :)

Hiked in from the west trailhead and after a while decided that I'd much rather walk in the stream then navigate the overgrown trails. I never had to navigate water more than knee deep and still managed to make pretty good time.

My plan was to camp in the area between Virgus and Horse Camp, but since I got to the area earlier than expected I continued on to see what else I could see between Horse Camp and Booger. Found a couple of nice campsites near Booger, but the constant hum of bees made me a bit concerned. Headed back to the Horse Camp area and took one of the sites there.

The second day I hiked back upstream to explore into Hell Hole Canyon. What an incredible place! I couldn't believe how different it was from the main canyon. After passing several seeps and springs I found one where it would be possible to top off my bottles so I stopped there and took a little break. After some trail math I realized that I should probably head back if I wanted to make it back to camp by 5:00. As much as the canyon was calling me to continue I forced myself to turn around at the ~2mile mark and head back.

The third day was supposed to be spent exploring Virgus Canyon on the way out, but the weather was getting progressively more and more ugly. In the span of 30 minutes it went from breezy and pleasant to cold cold and windy with dark clouds moving in. I cut my exploration of Virgus short (and in the process gave the palm of my hand a nasty cut). After a bit of first aid I shouldered my pack and made for the trailhead. Got a little bit of rain on the way back, but the weather got better the farther west I got.

Overall a great trip and I can't wait to return. I saw a lot more people than I had expected and ended up between two occupied campsites on the first night. Everyone was pleasant and respectful, but I was expecting a lot more solitude. Instead I counted at least 25 people!!

I was also disappointed that I didn't see much in terms of wildlife. Aside from a few deer near my camp and a couple of Blue Heron near the west entrance I didn't see much of any fauna. I also didn't see many tracks nor scat. I wonder if it was still a bit early in the season or if the number of people in the canyon were causing the animals to lay low. I'm hoping that I have a different experience on my next trip.

When I take my nephew I plan to devote the second day to exploring Virgus, Horse Camp, and maybe Booger rather than trekking all the way to Hell Hole. That was an awesome experience, but it was a bit of a slog. I think we'll have a lot more fun just exploring with no real plan or destination in mind.

Also, based on all of the descriptions that I read in advance of the trip I fully expected to prefer the east side of the canyon to the west. That wasn't the case at all. In fact I loved the stretch from Painted Cave Canyon to Virgus as I preferred the more closed-in feeling of the narrower canyon. In this stretch it seemed like there was something different around every corner whereas the stretch from Horse Camp to Hell Hole seemed to be a lot more of the same. In the future I think I'll do a trip in from the east side to see how the experience is different.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Booger Creek Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Deer Creek Pools to trickle Pools to trickle

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Horse Camp Canyon Pools to trickle Pools to trickle

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Paisano Canyon Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Virgus Canyon Pools to trickle Pools to trickle
Nov 30 2020
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 Guides 17
 Routes 69
 Photos 457
 Triplogs 49

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Nov 30 2020
GrangerGuyTriplogs 49
Backpack23.00 Miles 600 AEG
Backpack23.00 Miles2 Days   1 Hour      
600 ft AEG23 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
The Road:
The initial crossing of Aravaipa was dry, and then the wet crossings started. After the first two wet stream crossings, I had to wait for a couple of coatimundi crossing the road. There were lots of maple leaves falling on the road; kind of like a mini-snowstorm with the gusty winds. Maybe a little past the main color at this point. I had five uneventful creek crossings up to the main parking lot and outhouse.

I decided to go ahead in the car past the main parking lot. It was very beautiful but definitely 4WD, not just high clearance from the main parking to the trailhead. As you approach Turkey Creek, there are some large, crudely painted signs pointing to Turkey Creek, 200 yards. There are two more crossings from there which absolutely are 4WD, especially for the return trip. The small trailhead parking at the wilderness boundary is just beyond those signs. It is not clear if parking is allowed near the crudely painted signs.

The Trail to the Cliff Dwelling:
My plan for the first day was to park at the Turkey Creek, East Wilderness Trailhead, then hike to the Indian Ruins/Cliff Dwelling on Turkey Creek, then return to the car and head down the creek. At 10:00 am, I left the Turkey Creek Trailhead.

Turkey Creek was dry. Interesting, this road was not blocked off. It is not actually in the wilderness. The road 5108 is allowed to be driven. This had not been obvious to me. You can drive all the way to the ruins and beyond with a 4WD vehicle. Nevertheless, this was a nice warmup. The road was dry and flat. But it was cool in the morning, and I was just wearing a T-shirt.

The Turkey Creek Road is really a beautiful place. Fall colors still going on the first week of December. Lots of yellow and brown, but no red to speak of. If one wanted to get an early start on the Aravaipa Canyon, one could drive up to one of the campsites along Turkey Creek and camp overnight, before heading to the trail. There are about 6 nice campsites along the road between Aravaipa and the ruins.

Near the cliff dwellings, there is what looks like an old cowboy camp, including a corral. Road 5108 bears left at 1.5 miles from Aravaipa, and there is a sign for the cliff dwellings to the right. There is a trail register and an interpretive sign. Just at the base of the trail to the ruins, there is another good campsite.

Having visited the very intact cliff dwelling, I headed back to the Aravaipa.

The 3 mi round trip to the cliff dwelling was a good checkout for my footwear solution. For Aravaipa, I wore Merrill Bare Access trail running shoes, which are very light and very porous. Inside of that, I wore neoprene wet suit socks, and inside that, a thin pair of merino wool hiking liners. Over the outside, I wore lightweight trail running gaiters. This combination worked extraordinarily well. It kept my feet warm. Although a tiny bit of grit got inside the shoe, I did not feel it through the neoprene sock. The merino wool prevented any possibility of rubbing and therefore blisters. The only flaw in the system was that the shoes get very stiff and hard to put on when stored overnight in the 30s. About 30 miles total, including shakedowns, was a little hard on the neoprene socks, but they were old and worn anyway. :)

The Aravaipa Trail from the East:
I left the trailhead at 11:20 AM. Right away is the first walk in the stream; just a quick crossing near the trailhead. This place is positively awesome. There is a pretty good path on the right-hand side of the creek.

The second crossing of the creek came 0.3 mi from the trailhead. I had an idea that I would mark the crossings with waypoints. I kept it up most of the first 5 miles, but would not do it for the rest of the trip. Just after the second crossing, I picked up another way-trail on the left side of the creek.

I encountered the first deer about 0.6 miles down the trail. At about 0.8 mi, there is an interesting crack in the rocks, filled with debris. A small person could slip through without a pack and avoid a crossing. Everyone else has to go into the water to get around.

I spooked three javelina, 2 adults and a baby. The baby went one direction, the adults went the other. They were really annoyed at me. I did not turn my back on them until I was well clear of them.

You can see some pretty cool hoodoo like structures on the cliff tops at about 0.9 miles.

In early December, the color just continued to get better downstream. It went from more brown near the trailhead to more green and yellow a mile down. It was definitely not past the prime color yet.

I had a sense I should look for the "best" line of travel down the canyon, but I don't think there is any one "best" route. I think there are many good routes. If you just follow your gut, following this route is pretty easy.

I realized that my GPS track was going to be very noisy and would have to be cleaned up, due to being in the canyon. As it turned out, the noise added almost 7 miles to my apparent distance. This has been removed in my posted track.

The lighting in early December was just perfect for photography. Even at high noon, the sun is pretty low, and the light is beautiful. Taken with the fall colors, this was a great opportunity for photography.

At 1.8 mi, I encountered 3 more deer standing in the stream. It was time to look for a place to rest and have some lunch. A little break, sitting in the sun, felt pretty good. Usually I don't wait this long to eat, but I was having a lot of fun.

The thing to remember about Aravaipa is that it is about the journey, not the destination. It is like a trail to nowhere, but it is absolutely gorgeous every step.

There was no water in Parsons Canyon. It looks like it would be a cool explore, but it was not on the agenda. With the perennial water in Aravaipa, I don't see why one would worry about water from side-streams.

There is a great camping spot at 2.6 miles.

At 3 mi, just short of Deer Creek, I marked a spot where there are 2 beers parked next to the trail. I was going to pick them up, empty them, and carry them out on the way out, but I forgot to look. Though the canyon is quite clean and free of litter and debris, it puzzles and disappoints me someone would leave something like this.

There is great camping at the confluence with Deer Creek. The intersection with Deer Creek is not at all what I expected. I expected a slot canyon, but it is very wide and flat, at least for some distance. There is another good camp spot at 3.2 miles, on the right hand side going downstream.

One great thing about traveling this in December. No bugs! No bugs!

I ran into my first person a little past Deer Creek. He was obviously a photographer with a good camera and tripod. For a mile or so, I had noted I was catching up with someone, by the footprints exiting the stream.

Just short of 5 miles, I lost the path for a bit, and the stream was pretty deep. Nevertheless, it seemed walking in the stream was the best plan for about 100 yards.

I startled some coatimundis, actually we startled each other. They have an interesting high-pitched squeak. They were gone in a flash.

Very near the outlet of Booger Canyon, the trail crosses right to left. Near the outlet of Booger Canyon, on the other side of the creek, there is a really nice campsite. It is not overused. There was a white-tailed deer running across my path in the area. I walked a little beyond, and then decided to go back to the campsite I saw. Judging from the map, it looked like it would be prettier there than in the Horse Canyon area. This decision would cost me the ability to get to the west wilderness boundary the next day, though, since the plan for day 2 was to hike down to the west boundary, and back to this location.

Day 2, Aravaipa:
I started out about 8:20 AM. Before leaving, I cleaned up the campsite a little, picking up debris left by previous campers, then headed for the west boundary. I saw 3 deer right away.

As you leave the Booger Canyon area, the terrain begins to change from broad canyon, meadow and forest to narrower canyon. There are lots of different trails, very braided. You don't have to worry about getting lost, but sometimes the path you are on disappears and you have to hunt for another.

I passed Horse Canyon on the opposite side of the creek. Looks beautiful, though. There is a campsite here, across from Horse Canyon. Not as nice as the one I found at Booger Canyon. The campsites are very heavily used. The tent sites are down to the dirt. Glad I did not stay here the first night. This is obviously a popular place to stay for people coming in from the west. And yet, a little further down, another really sandy camp site.

A little further down, just past the bend in the creek going downstream, there is an awesome campsite on the north bank under an overhanging cliff. It is sandy, but would be rain protected. Only thing is, I would not want to be anywhere in this canyon if rain was forecast.

At 8.3 miles from the east end, the canyon begins to open up. The stream turns south and opens up to the 11 am late fall sun. For the first time on day 2, I got to feel some warmth from the sun.

At 8.6 miles, I stopped to take some pictures of a pretty little rapid. One of the very few on this sedate creek. In the lower part of the river, it seems easier to just walk in the water. The side trails are overgrown; the water is pretty easy.

All of a sudden, it felt like I was getting to the end of the wilderness. The canyon began widening out and the walls began to get shorter. There is a concrete wall here. At 12:00, I had to turn around to get back to my camp before it got too late. From a practical standpoint, I had left the wilderness, although not from a legal standpoint. Judging from the map later, I was about 600 trail yards from the boundary when I turned around.

On my return upstream, I came across an unnamed waterfall from the south side. It is dry, but there is all this white stuff, on the surface, making it look like there is water. I had to cross, so I did not get any closer to the dry waterfall. The rest of the hike back to my camp I did not make any further notes, as I was focused on getting back.

Day 3, Aravaipa:
8:08 am, I headed out. My feet were freezing as I left camp. My watch said it got to freezing, but there was no ice to be seen anywhere. Nevertheless, my shoes were so cold, they were stiff. I could not tie them, and barely could get them on. Once I made a few crossings, the shoes were soft, and I could tighten and tie them, and they were toasty the rest of the way.

As the sun got higher, I had to stop to change from my stocking cap to my booney hat and put on my sunglasses. Even though I was a little cold, the sun was my enemy. I could not see where I was going.

Just to keep warm, I was going pretty much non-stop for 2.5 hours. I decided to stop and take a break. I found a nice log in the sun and stopped to eat a little lunch and rest. As I finished, I looked at my map to see how far I had to go after my snack. Haha, turns out I was just about 0.2 mi from the car.
Meteorology
Meteorology [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Autumn - Color Foliage
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Substantial
The best fall colors are in the eastern half of the canyon, and seemed to peak near Deer Creek.
Nov 14 2020
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 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 2,451
 Triplogs 142

37 male
 Joined Mar 01 2018
 Chandler, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 14 2020
John10sTriplogs 142
Hiking14.96 Miles 300 AEG
Hiking14.96 Miles   6 Hrs   1 Min   2.76 mph
300 ft AEG      36 Mns Break
 
Partners partners
TboneKathy
Two weeks ago, we hiked in Aravaipa starting from the west trailhead, and we enjoyed it so much that we immediately started looking for permits to the east trailhead, and we were lucky enough to find an opening this past weekend. The drive from Phoenix to the east trailhead is much longer, and we ended up having to drive past the turn off on Highway 70 to fill with gas in Pima to make sure we had a full tank to get into Aravaipa and back out. There isn't much in the way of larger towns past Globe, and the only gas station we passed in Bylas was closed and didn't have a pay at pump option, and we saw no gas stations along the highway in Fort Thomas.

The 40+ miles of dirt road leading to the trailhead is in very good shape, and it was so flat and straight we were able to drive 65+ mph along some stretches, which trimmed a nice chunk off the estimated arrival time the GPS originally projected. There were five shallow creek crossings over the last few miles to the trailhead, but nothing a vehicle with reasonably high clearance couldn't handle. We debated driving the extra 1.5 miles on the "4x4 recommended" road to the Turkey Creek parking lot but decided against it since we weren't sure about the condition of the road or creek crossings, but in hindsight, we could have made it without any issues based on the vehicles parked there, many of which were lower clearance than what we were driving.

That added 1.5 miles to our hike each way, but it was fast, easy hiking along the road. The fall colors were fantastic, and we saw six wild turkeys along the trail in the first mile on our way to the Turkey Creek cliff dwelling. I was surprised to see how "domesticated" the site was--the BLM had signs pointing to the location, rails along the short walk up to the cliff wall, and informational signs about the history of the dwelling and the inhabitants. The structure lived up to its reputation as one of the best-preserved Solado ruins in SE Arizona--it was in great shape aside from some holes in the roof, though one opening was a window that the natives had intentionally built into the roof. Like some of the other Solado ruins I've seen, finger marks were visible in the mortar of the walls--it's always interesting to see those 700 year-old handprints frozen in time and to imagine what life was like back then. This was the first Solado dwelling I'd seen built in this fashion, with a roof sloping into the canyon wall, and I was impressed by how well it blended in. Later, as we hiked out, we could barely see it from the road below even when we knew what we were looking for.

After leaving the dwelling, we hiked back along Turkey Creek and turned into Aravaipa. The geology on the east side of the canyon is different from the west, but no less beautiful. Between the fall colors, the beautiful water, and the canyon walls, it was a fantastic hike. This side seemed to have more informal trails along the banks of the creek, so we didn't spend as much time walking directly in the creek for extended stretches. We passed a quite a few groups heading in both directions as we hiked in, and we turned at Deer Creek/Hell Hole to explore the side canyon and search for Hell's Hole arch.

The geology of the canyon changed again in that area, with darker rock and more hoodoo-like formations up along the rim, and more saguaros up there. We followed the dry wash into Hell Hole, and the scenery was spectacular, with towering canyon walls and interesting rock formations. The walls were littered with stains from areas where water flows when it rains...that area would be incredible with water flowing, with multiple 100+ foot waterfalls. The canyon looked like it was going to dead-end ahead of us, but the walls narrowed and it curved to the north. Farther back, there was a trickle of water, and just as we started talking about turning around to make it back to the trailhead at a decent time, we saw Hell's Hole up on the canyon wall. The arch was a great feature, and we were happy we found it before we had to turn around.

If we had more time, we would have explored farther west in Aravaipa and checked out Booger Canyon, but that'll have to wait for another visit. Between the two visits, I still haven't seen the middle part of Aravaipa and or many of the side canyons. On the hike out, we had a few more wildlife encounters, including several deer and a great blue heron. We still hadn't seen any coatimundis, but we lucked out--at the end of our hike, within a mile of the east trailhead, we came cross five or six coatis near the trail, the first time either of us had seen one. It was the perfect ending to a great day of hiking, and on the drive out, we ended up seeing five or six more coatis along the road...when it rains, it pours :). The day worked out just about perfectly--on top of the great weather and fall colors, we got to check out the cliff dwelling and Hell's Hole and saw a lot of great wildlife in ~15 miles of hiking.
Fauna
Fauna [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Coatimundi
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Substantial

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Deer Creek Pools to trickle Pools to trickle
water report recorded in the field on our app Route Scout Dry on the way into Hell Hole Canyon and just a trickle of water farther back in the canyon
2 archives
Oct 30 2020
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 23
 Photos 2,451
 Triplogs 142

37 male
 Joined Mar 01 2018
 Chandler, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 30 2020
John10sTriplogs 142
Hiking11.73 Miles 1,648 AEG
Hiking11.73 Miles   7 Hrs   37 Mns   1.69 mph
1,648 ft AEG      40 Mns Break
 
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TboneKathy
This was my first visit to Aravaipa, and my hiking partner was able to secure a permit when a cancellation gave us an opening. We started from the west trailhead, and the area, including the last stretch of the drive, was very beautiful before we even got into the canyon. We were only doing a day hike, so we knew we wouldn't be able to hike the full ~12-mile length of the canyon and back, but we wanted to explore Horse Canyon around the midpoint.

Despite the dry year, the creek was still flowing, though I assume the water levels are down from where they would typically be around this time of year. We'd read that there are quite a few side canyons that can be fun to explore and that they're hard to see because of the thick foliage along the creek. I took a quick look at the topo map the night before the hike and marked waypoints on the GPS near the side canyons in case we wanted to check them out. Many of them were, indeed, tough to see from Aravaipa Creek.

We didn't end up checking out the side canyons along the way, but the landscape was fantastic--a unique combination of water/trees nearby, surrounded by a more traditional desert landscape up higher. The water temperature was cool but not uncomfortably cold, and we saw some wildlife along the way--fish, a small snake, a skunk, and a deer standing in the middle of the creek up ahead as we rounded a corner. Unfortunately, we didn't see any coatis...maybe next time.

There were a few tents set up near Horse Camp, and we turned north into Horse Canyon and spent some time exploring. It was a great area and would be even more incredible if the water was flowing more heavily. We scrambled up a few levels along dry falls and cliffs and ate lunch among the smooth rock slides and pools. It was clear from the stains on the rocks that when the water is flowing, there are a lot of water falls in that area, and the pools are connected as the water cascades down the canyon. Definitely a place I want to check out again when there's more water.

We hiked back into the canyon until we reached a dead end where we would have had to backtrack and climb up and around the obstacles to continue, but we were running out of time. We could see two or three big caves farther back in the canyon that would have been fun to see up close, but another stop for the next visit. We hiked back out through the creek again, and as we drove out on the gravel road, we spotted four or five javelinas, including two small babies that ran up the hillside as we passed.

The hike itself was flat and relatively easy, but the views were fantastic, and there's a lot to explore between Aravaipa and the many side canyons. We plan to return soon and try the east trailhead so we can check out the other side of the canyon and the Turkey Creek ruin.
Feb 06 2020
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 Routes 61
 Photos 1,008
 Triplogs 224

41 male
 Joined Aug 19 2009
 The Basin
Aravaipa CanyonGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Feb 06 2020
survivordudeTriplogs 224
Backpack17.50 Miles 1,462 AEG
Backpack17.50 Miles2 Days         
1,462 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Partners partners
HighC480
Route Scout Route Recorded  on Route Scout Popup | MapDEX
First time out to this wonderful place and it was fantastic! Last minute decision to go and there were plenty of permits still available. Saw a bobcat on the drive in which was the first good sign. The trail is mostly just walking in the creek for the first mile or so = frozen feet. After a while a very distinct trail was followed as it crisscrossed the creek many times. Came across some javelina and several deer on the hike just past Horse Camp Canyon. Unbelievable amount of animal tracks. I have never seen so may in my life. Deer, javelina, racoons, coatis, and CATS! We made camp near Booger Canyon and decided to take the side trek and it was well worth it. Lots of climbing over HUGE boulders took us to a section with so many waterfalls, we lost count. Found a nice ledge to take a break on and watch the sunset. As soon as that sun sets, it drops like 20 degrees. None of the camp spots had fire rings, but we were very sure there were no fire restrictions (unlike one unnamed, unfortunate soul). I had 27 on the thermometer at 7AM. Shoes and socks were frozen solid. No issues with animals getting into our food, but we did bag it and hang it properly (unlike one unnamed, unfortunate soul). The hike out was about 30 minutes quicker that the hike in. This included a nice talk with the park ranger, Heidi, who was picking some invasive mustard plants and checking permits. If you see her, her name is Heidi, she is not asking for your ID :sl: Saw more deer and some Cardinals. For some reason I left feeling somewhat disappointed. Probably due to the season and still not seeing a bighorn in the wild. Does not take away from this totally amazing area and cant wait to go back when its not so cold!

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Booger Canyon Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Cave Canyon Medium flow Medium flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Horse Camp Canyon Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Javalina Canyon Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Virgus Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
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3 archives
Jun 11 2018
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 Routes 27
 Photos 279
 Triplogs 56

36 male
 Joined Aug 06 2009
 Phoenix, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Jun 11 2018
nathanbriskTriplogs 56
Backpack10.33 Miles 1,309 AEG
Backpack10.33 Miles3 Days         
1,309 ft AEG45 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Amateur Aur At Aravaipa: Insult and Injury

This was one of my most humbling trips in a while. It seemed like everything went wrong!

A friend of mine invited me to join her for a 2-night backpack to Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness. She had a pass for 10 people, but as the trip date approached, her attendees were flaking like Tony the Tiger. The night before the trip, the trip organizer herself even backed out. She told me she'd do a day hike to meet me on Tuesday or Wednesday. But me--being a stubborn [insert ancestral stereotype here]--decided to go anyway. She emailed me a copy of her permit, and I saw it at about 3 in the morning--about an hour before I planned to drive out. Turns out I wasn't even allowed to go there without her; the permits are "un-transferrable." I decided to give it a shot anyway. Worst case scenario--someone tells me to go home.

During the drive in, I saw some wild javelinas (i think).

Day 1:

The highs for the day were in the low 100's, so I got an early start at 6am from the trailhead. The heat was completely bearable at that hour. The hike in was alright. I'd never done a wet hike before, so I didn't really know what to expect. I brought some pruners and was able to cut back some thorny branches from off the trail at a few points. I saw a coatimundi. I rolled in to Horse Camp and got my camp set up. i was surprised to find the fire pit dismantled. So of course--I made one. I know I had read somewhere on the permit to "use existing fire rings," but I didn't find any of those. I played in the creek some, lounged in the hammock, chatted with some other hikers. I saw about 4 other people at Horse Camp. I spent the evening playing my ukelele (feebly) around the campfire but was eventually driven into my tent by the bugs. They were unbearable.

Day 2:

I wake up in the morning to find my food bag completely molested by some wild animal. I felt so ashamed. I thought I had done it all! I hanged if from a branch about 8 feet off of the ground and 3 feet from the upper branch. What was peculiar to me was that the animal(s) didn't tear or bite through my stuff sack--THEY OPENED IT. As in--squeezed the button release and freakin' opened the stuff sack. I'm not altogether sure what I did wrong. But I know there are a few possible probs 1) the branch I hanged it from was too thick . . . critters were able to scale it easily and/or 2) I didn't store my food in thick freezer bags. Of course using a bear canister or ratsack would have resolved the issue, too, but I've never had to do that before. Of all the food I packed, the animals left me two tuna packets, 3 cheese packets, and few a hot drink mixes. That really took the wind out of my sails. Due to my newfound lack of nutrients, I opted to stay around camp until it was time to hike out on Wednesday. I ate my final food for breakfast and lunch. Spent all day reading Ian Fleming novels on my Nook. In the evening, I decided to not fight the bugs and instead spent a few hours in my tent listening to the pitter patter of all God's insects assaulting my plastic walls. Heard the sounds of a large animal poking around outside, so I kept my bowie and bear spray close. I saw about 6 people that day.

Day 3

Waited until 11am for the trip organizer to show up. She didn't. I decided to wait until dusk to hike out. By that time I hadn't eaten for 24 hours. Fortunately, I brought some salt tablets to replenish my electrolytes/sodium levels/anti-exhaustion-units. Hiking out went by a good deal faster. I was surprised at the preponderance of dead-and-down wood; that will certainly be a problem in the future. When I came to the trailhead, I looked more closely at the bulletin board. NO CAMPFIRES ALLOWED. What the heckenstein? No friggin' wonder there weren't any fire rings. I was ashamed of myself. I put my fire out completely, but I had still inadvertently broken the law. Sucks. I might be fined--we'll see. The bulletin board also said that bear-resistant food containers were advised.

During the drive out, I saw some white-tailed deer (I think).

This has been my most embarrassing trip for a while. Hopefully I learned some life lessons. I've certainly learned that real bug spray is necessary (my tea tree oil solution didn't cut it), and I won't go camping again without better food protection. I'll read over the dang trail bulletin board before beginning.

Here's my trip vlog: [ youtube video ]

UPDATE 6/26/2018:
I made an honest mistake, and I've made no attempt to hide it. Really I posted this triplog in hopes someone might learn from it. My conscience is clear, and I had learned my lessons before driving away from the wilderness area. One further thing I could have learned: hide my sins, and find safety in a lie. But not today.

I've been reported to the BLM. Perhaps I struck someone as the type who needed to learn his lesson in the wallet. And if a HAZ member saw fit to alert an authority about my candid triplog, I wonder how far my ~$500 will go to maintain their self-righteous smirk? And frankly--judging from the over-abundance of dead-and-down fuel in this wilderness--my quarantined, controlled, tended and summarily-snuffed campfire did more to decrease the risk of wildfire in the area than had been done prior; so, you're welcome.

As you sicc the authoritarian bulldog of our nanny-state on my finances for ignorant appreciation of yesteryear's freedoms, our founding fathers turn over in their graves, and you inch yet closer to the karmic destiny of a miserable louse.
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Camp-fire
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8 archives
May 27 2017
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 Routes 78
 Triplogs 93

male
 Joined Nov 11 2011
 
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar May 27 2017
charlomechfryTriplogs 93
Backpack16.39 Miles 981 AEG
Backpack16.39 Miles2 Days         
981 ft AEG
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
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1 archive
Nov 28 2016
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 Guides 1
 Routes 13
 Photos 444
 Triplogs 12

73 male
 Joined Nov 10 2014
 Peoria, AZ
Hell Hole Valley - Deer Creek, AZ 
Hell Hole Valley - Deer Creek, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Nov 28 2016
HikingBuddyTriplogs 12
Hiking8.17 Miles 3,100 AEG
Hiking8.17 Miles   4 Hrs   26 Mns   1.84 mph
3,100 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Had opportunity to hike with a diverse group of fine hikers, 10 including me, guys, gals, old and young. We hiked about 2.5 miles up east end of Aravaipa Canyon and setup our camp for nite. We hiked in and out of creek but water wasn't very cold. Got some snowflakes and light rain the first nite -- had some good bourbon, whatnot and warm grub to keep us from freezing. The next day we hiked 4 miles up Hell Hole Valley (canyon) along Deer Creek and back. A wonderful experience. That nite was clear but cold, more bourbon, whatnot and warm grub to keep us warm. Ice over everything next morning. Hiked backed out after warm breakfast on day 3.
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2 archives
Oct 24 2016
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 Routes 17
 Photos 485
 Triplogs 487

74 male
 Joined Jan 07 2010
 Chandler, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Oct 24 2016
Mike_FelsTriplogs 487
Backpack28.00 Miles 1,300 AEG
Backpack28.00 Miles2 Days   5 Hrs      
1,300 ft AEG37 LBS Pack
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
Did a 3 day backpacking trip in the canyon. Actually my third visit there. All my visits have been in October, but I think this year was the warmest of the three. Water level was as close as I can tell the same as it had been for the others. The main difference was the lack of animals. Last time I bet I saw 30 big horned sheep, this time not a one. Last time I had to hike through various groups of javelina totaling about 30 along the trail, this time not one in sight. I don't know if this was caused by the warmth or not. I did see two large families of coatimundi. I love watching them as they always seem to be having so much fun playing in the trees. There were several different types of birds, hawks, great blue herons, lots of song birds. Lots more people too. Last time there was only one person I saw in three days, this time it was nine. Granted nine people spread over an eleven mile span doesn't make it all too crowded.

The water was great. Cool, about 40 degrees I would guess. This time I was smart and wore a pair of gaiters!!! They are worth their weight in gold. Not once did I have any sand or gravel in by boots. I would never do this hike again without gaiters.

I camped near Horse Camp Canyon.

This was the first time I knew to check for Hell Hole Canyon. In fact that was a goal of this trip. Hell Hole is so misnamed, it is a fantastic place. So different from Aravaipa, but still beautiful in it's own way. I hit it about 9:30am and exited just before noon. I found that a lot of it's beauty was more visible without the sun being directly overhead. Early morning and probably late afternoon are the best times to see this place. It's a slot canyon, not a sandstone one like Antelope, but well worth a visit. After about a mile and a half in I hit a point that it felt like the temperature spiked a good 10 degrees within a few feet. And it kept raising from there on. The walls were getting shorter, must have been getting towards the end of the canyon. It wasn't nearly as nice to view either.

Figuring out the distance and AEG hiked is the hard part. My GPS said I hiked 35.04 miles in the 3 days. But looking at the track shows that I must have scaled a lot of vertical cliffs. With the satellite signals reflecting off the walls I know this number is ridiculous. The BLM map's numbers show it would have been a minimum of at least 20 miles. After playing in MapDex, BaseCamp, and Google Earth I figure 25 to 30 miles is probably about accurate. Seeing as a hike here is like a billiard ball bouncing off the rails, most of the distance covered is spent crossing the stream. Likewise most of the AEG encountered is climbing out of the stream a hundred times. The GPS came up with an ascent of 1529' and a descent of 2468'... From the topos it looks like the west entry into the stream is at about 2600', the entrance to Hell Hole is at 3100' and as far as I went into Hell Hole it gets up to about 3300'. Add in a few side trips and climbing out of the stream a hundred times, I guess I'd figure about 1300' is fair.
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Sep 20 2016
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 Guides 3
 Photos 4,732
 Triplogs 2,168

52 male
 Joined Sep 29 2004
 Small Town USA
Aravaipa CanyonGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Canyoneering avatar Sep 20 2016
SkyIslander18Triplogs 2,168
Canyoneering11.00 Miles 200 AEG
Canyoneering11.00 Miles
200 ft AEG
Canyon Hiking - Non-technical; no rope; easy scrambling; occasional hand use
B - Up to light current; wading/swimming; possible wet/dry suit
III - Normally requires most of a day
 no routes
5am departure from Pima.
Very scenic drive into the East entrance during sunrise.
7am entrance into Aravaipa.
Downstream to Hell Hole Canyon and in up to the spring/hanging gardens.
Back upstream to Turkey Creek and a visit up to the cliff dwelling.
Overcast all day, water felt great, lots of greenery with hints of autumn to come.
Wildlife - 7 javelina (with young), 1 deer, 1 bobcat, 20 vultures, 2 hawks, 1 ring-neck snake, many creek fish, 1 heron, 10,000 caterpillars, 1000 butterflies, insects of all kinds & a very unpleasant amount of biting mosquitoes.
Solid 9 out of 10 trip (1 point deduction due to the mosquitoes).
:D
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Aravaipa Canyon Medium flow Medium flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Deer Creek Light flow Light flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Turkey Creek Light flow Light flow
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Sep 27 2015
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 Guides 103
 Routes 262
 Photos 9,788
 Triplogs 768

60 male
 Joined Dec 20 2010
 Sunnyslope, PHX
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 27 2015
kingsnakeTriplogs 768
Hiking18.28 Miles 330 AEG
Hiking18.28 Miles   7 Hrs   57 Mns   2.30 mph
330 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Missed out on the last Aravaipa Property Owners Association (APOA) thru hike, I think it was last year, so I wanted to make sure I made it this year, even though it would mean missing the likely peak colors up Bear Canyon way. Most of the folks stayed at the TNC guest house between Cobra Ranch and the pit toilet TH; my wife and I opted for the Spring Hill Suites in Thatcher. She said the area had much improved since she worked for the Corps of Engineers out there 20 years ago. After a long drive, and checking out the Klondyke Pioneer Cemetery ( [ photoset ] ), I was crashing hard. Rather than try one of the area's good sit-down Mexican joints, I opted for a Taco Bell quickie. (I love quesaritos!) 8-[

I woke up about 12:30 a.m. -- I don't sleep well in hotels, even when I bring my own pillow along -- and never really got back to sleep. :(

We met up with the APOA about 8:00 a.m., intending to drive to the Turkey Creek TH. However, two recent 700 cfs floods, plus two recent 1000 cfs floods, had caused some jeep trail damage. (Mark Haberstich, TNC manager, said normal flow is ~12 cfs.) There was a several foot high shelf about halfway, that our driver did not feel comfortable tackling. Especially not with a dozen people hanging off the hay bales in the back of her pickup.

I hung up front with Chris the Speed Demon the three miles from Turkey Creek to Deer Creek. While we took a break, everyone else caught up, then we started up to Hell Hole, a natural arch ~1.5 miles up canyon. While the majority continued up Deer Creek, past the arch, I stayed back to take Hell Hole pix -- about a dozen. (In all, for the weekend, I shot 223 photos and video segments.) :whistle: When, after awhile, they had not returned, I took to studying caterpillars ( https://youtu.be/v5 ... 1y0s ). After an hour, and worried they may have somehow got back around behind me, and considering it was nearly 1:00 p.m. and I still had 12 miles to go, I headed back to Aravaipa Creek, picking up Bill & Linda (who had been bird-watching) along the way. We hiked together the rest of the day. :)

One advantage of the floods was that they had blown away the slime that often covers Aravaipa's rocks, so footing was pretty good on the many creek crossings. Unfortunately, the flood also made the side areas often quite muddy -- as evidenced by the numerous sideways hiker tracks. :doh:

My new 5-10 Water Tennies held up real well. I had previously worn some other brand of water shoes, which were so uncomfortable as to cause stabbing pain, crappy old sneakers (which actually did okay), and sandals, from which I had to dig out 1/2" rocks every 50-100 meters because despite the ~12 cfs flow, Aravaipa's current is strong enough to move small rocks (or cattle thigh bones). Only a few grains of sand penetrated the shoes, and absolutely no pebbles whatsoever. :y:

Near Javalina Canyon I almost sloshed into a snake swimming in the creek. :o When I realized he was enjoying a relaxing swim, instead of attacking, we stopped for a few minutes to watch him ( https://youtu.be/ff ... fnvM ).

One of our non-hiking neighbors, Langdon, owns the old Wagner Ranch, so we ended our hike there, rather than continuing the final .75 miles to the west end TH. 18.28 miles is the longest I've walked in a single day since the 35 miles I accumulated while hitchhiking across Utah in May, 1983, when I was 20 years old. :DANCE: After making sure everyone had made it -- Paul was somewhere back up canyon -- I met up with my patient wife, who had made the four hour end-to-end shuttle drive. :kf: We dropped Bill & Linda off at their place along Aravaipa Rd., took some photos of the Supermoon, then drove all the way back to Sunnyslope. Having only eaten some gorp, I ate twice on the way home: a murderwich from the Dudleyville store (now a Giant) and a supersize Big Mac meal from the Gold Canyon Mickey D's. :D

Despite my right foot being severely sore, I slept like a log. :zzz:

-----

Thru Hike Video: https://youtu.be/ml ... vm-M
Flora
Flora [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Saguaro
Geology
Geology [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Natural Arch
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Balloon
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Deer Creek Hell Hole Valley
Meteorology
Meteorology [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Moon Sunburst
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
Not yet. Still lower 90s mid-day, in unshadowed areas. Maybe in another week or two?

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Deer Creek Light flow Light flow
Water looked good.
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1 archive
Jan 03 2015
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 24
 Photos 94
 Triplogs 19

53 male
 Joined Aug 12 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 03 2015
ZortTriplogs 19
Hiking12.80 Miles 600 AEG
Hiking12.80 Miles   6 Hrs      2.13 mph
600 ft AEG25 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
New Year's in Aravaipa Canyon

A chilly five-mile splash in from the west turned to dinner rain, overnight snow and cold glory in the morning. Really no way to keep your feet warm in these conditions. Neoprene socks help, as does cinching the legs of your waterproof pants down over your boots. Gore-Tex or no, the deeper creek crossings will swamp your hiking boots.

Young deer, especially a buck were spotted a few times in the canyon and around camp between Horse Camp and Virgus Canyons. Beautiful way to spend New Year's Eve and Day.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Moderate
Many leaves on the ground, buts colors still on the trees though fading
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http://instagram.com/zort_the_beholder
Dec 27 2014
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 Guides 29
 Routes 329
 Photos 9,686
 Triplogs 920

40 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
GET 7 through 9, AZ 
GET 7 through 9, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Dec 27 2014
FOTGTriplogs 920
Backpack61.94 Miles 11,320 AEG
Backpack61.94 Miles4 Days         
11,320 ft AEG
 
1st trip
The Grand Enchantment Trail was never on my radar until azdesertfather suggested knocking out segments 7,8,9 over a three day trek. I thought it sounded cool and said sure. After all I had never did Aravaipa and had heard great things about the Santa Teresa's from the few that have hiked them. I had to leave the pups back on this one because of Aravaipa which was a bit of a bummer. However, I was excited to get to a new area and knock out some more mileage over my holiday break and I knew the kiddos would be in good hands at uncle Chumleys.

Day 1: Section 7, Aravaipa Wilderness

This day would be characterized by closed highways, a late start, wet boots and cold water. We knew we were going to get a late start on the first day, as we had to set up our shuttle. This meant a 330 departure time from Phoenix for me and a very early dog drop off at Chumleys. HAZ appreciation Chumleys way one more time for taking on my unruly children, I swear I am going to pay you one of these times ;) After the dog drop off, things were going perfect for our 0630 Pima link up. Then we hit a small snag an accident just outside of Superior on the 60 necessitated a scenic 0530 in the morning detour through Winkleman. Nevertheless, we only found ourselves about 45 minutes behind schedule by the time we reached Pima. We set up our shuttle and were stepping off at Araviapa just after 11:30. Aravaipa was simply amazing for me even with the extremely cold water and long stretches of sunless very cold canyon we had to wade through, if the water was not running it was frozen in these sections. Aravaipa was so scenic I am almost ashamed to say I spent less then five hours in the beautiful canyon, no worries though, it will be there next time and we had a mission to complete. Day one culminated with a very liberal interpretation of the Nature Conservatory's no camping policy.

Day 2: GET 8, Santa Teresa Wilderness

Day two started very cold, and I mean like Stalingrad winter of 43 cold! I have woke up to cold boots, wet boots and torn up boots, however courtesy of Ariviapa Creek this was the first time I woke up to frozen solid boots. I got a quick fire going and coaxed Dave out of his tent, but I could tell from the start he was feeling the effects of a very cold morning and uncomfortable night. I had listened to my go to guy for weather and bought an 11-20 degree liner for my 25 degree down bag, as I was told to be prepared for a deep freeze. I got my first real view of the Santa Teresas just after Reef Tank and all I will say is if you have not made it there, find away to get there. A stunning landscape of rocks, snow covered peaks, mixed in with some pine and several partially frozen cascades along the robust flowing inner drainages and creeks. I coaxed, prodded and annoyed Dave literally about as far as he could go on day two. We made camp, refueled and prepared for another night in the Arctic.

Day 3: GET 8, Cottonwood Mountain

The second morning was some how colder. The water I had brought up from creek for breakfast and hot drinks froze in the little less then 15 minutes it took me to get to ready to heat it. The first part of day three was spent finding a "creative" way to skirt the stretch of private land that breaks up the section 8 of the GET as you leave and reenter the Santa Teresa. From there it was up Cottonwood Mountain. The climb was not overly bad and other then a few faint spots the trail was great, cacti mingling with ponderosa and snow covered agave. Dave equally enjoyed this section, albeit it at a much more leisurely pace. We regrouped at the top and started making our way down. I will admit I still had small aspirations of pushing through head lamp marathon style, but it simply was not in the cards for Dave on this day. He did allow/tolerate me to push him until just after sunset, as I did not want anything to do with camping above 5000 feet with the temps we had been dealing with. I think we made it to exactly 5000 feet and actually enjoyed are nicest camp site of trip. Although, I may be using the word enjoy a little loosely, as night three proved to be hands down the coldest night of trip. We found our water freezing in mere minutes if taken away from the fire and even as we unpacked our gear ice formed on any object with the slightest amount of moisture left on it from the previous night's condensation. I slept relatively well, Dave had a bit of a restless cold night, but we survived and it did not take us much to get going the next morning.

Day 4: GET 9

Aravaipa and the Santa Teresa's were amazing, however, I would rate this segment somewhere between dull and stale. Although, the above mentioned are two tough acts to follow, it would have taken a lot for segement 9 to impress me. Dave was doing much better on the initial stretches of quad trails and forest roads, however, he knew he was not where he would normally be and certainly not where I was. He suggested leaving his gear at Klondike road and finishing the last 8 miles pack free. Initially, I was dreading the detour back to Klondike, but I knew it meant a lot for him to complete the segment and heck I only had a trip to Tuscon and Phoenix still left on my day, so what was a small detour at this point? ;) It would have made perfect sense for me to leave my gear as well, but I opted to carry mine out. Anyone who knows me, knows I have no problem leaving people in the wilderness, but never gear, too expensive to replace. It actually turned out to be a pretty good idea, Dave was like a new man once he shed that pack and was able to knock out the final 8 miles at a pretty good clip and arrived at the TH about 20 minutes after me. We both agreed had he carried pack, we would have been looking at a mid afternoon finish instead of our lunchtime finish. Dave found a nice shortcut via a decent forest road that got us back to his gear quicker then we had expected. I think the trip back to his gear mall only ended up costing us a little over a half hour. In the end a really good four day trek, rugged, a little challenging, great company, some tremendous areas, and generally good times. It was really nice to get back to that part of the state and I am already planning a return. I am grateful to have gotten the invite to help Dave knock out some coveted sections of the GET.

Final Notes: Blisterfree writes superb descriptions, with spot on routes and directions, so some well deserved HAZ is appreciation his way, as he blazed this very rugged rewarding route.

Trail humor: Apparently my very dry humor is equally as unappreciated among hiking partners as it is in the classroom. For example, Dave says, " I think this is the last trip for these shoes they are no good anymore" my response, "ya, but you can save the "souls" right?" Dave, "huh?" Me, "never mind."
Fauna
Fauna [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Wild Turkey
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Reef Tank
_____________________
4 archives
Dec 27 2014
avatar

 Guides 12
 Routes 60
 Photos 1,225
 Triplogs 900

48 male
 Joined Apr 30 2008
 Tucson, AZ
Grand Enchantment Trail #7-9, AZ 
Grand Enchantment Trail #7-9, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Dec 27 2014
azdesertfatherTriplogs 900
Backpack63.07 Miles 11,436 AEG
Backpack63.07 Miles3 Days      26 Mns   
11,436 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
This was an epic trip and a great way to end 2014. It's one I have wanted to do for over a year and just waiting for someone crazy enough to take this on as a backpack trip, as GET #8 as a day trip was out of my league (left for guys like juanjaimeiii!). Super thankful to find friendofThundergod eager to take it on and help me get one of the most remote sections of the GET checked off the list.

One of the first challenges was just finding someone to help us with the shuttle on this one. I originally had a friend who had committed to do the drop off at the beginning of GET 8 (east end of Aravaipa) whenever I was ready to go, but when the dates were finally picked, he was going to be out of town. Lee hadn't done GET 7 (Aravaipa Creek), and shuttle help for the west end of Aravaipa was going to be much easier to pull off, so we chose to make it GET 7-8-9 rather than just 8-9. Big shout out to friends Al & Kevin for making the 3-hour drive to Aravaipa to pick up my Jeep and drive it home, saving a bunch of extra drive time on trip out.

Sat 27, GET #7-8 (~15mi/1100aeg, 5hr 48min)
Started out about 4am, met up with Lee in Pima to set up a crazy shuttle on the NW end of the Pinalenos. Had a 45-minute detour due to an accident, but he left his vehicle at the end point and I drove us around to the west Aravaipa TH. About 7½ hours after starting the shuttle, we were finally set up and descending into Aravaipa to begin the adventure. Knowing that wet shoes are part of the game when doing Aravaipa (and that we were doing this in late December), I opted to bring a pair of water shoes for Aravaipa, which worked out great. Knowing we had a long ways to go, we opted to do Aravaipa without any exploration. We didn't see any wildlife except for one deer, but we were blazing through pretty quick, finishing all of Aravaipa in 5 hours on the dot. We finished about a half mile ahead of plan, past the old Salazar church, camping out the first night about a half mile or so into GET 8.

Sun 28, GET #8 (~17mi/3300aeg, 9hr 24min)
We woke up to some chilly temps as expected. In retrospect, the one thing I wish I had added to my pack was an extra liner for my sleeping bag. We were in the 20s the first 2 nights, but it was all right, it just gave us extra motivation to get our packs on early each day and take off. One other thing I wish I had done differently was carry less water on this day. Uncertain with water reliability, I carried 6 liters to get to the end of GET 8, which I didn't need to do and put my pack that day at over 50 lbs.

The day started with a little dirt road action before we could hit the western edge of the Santa Teresas to get the blood flowing, and started our climb. Heading down Aravaipa Road at sunrise, we came upon over a dozen wild turkeys waking up from their roost; amazing watching these big birds make their way up and down off of high tree branches! Coming up on the Teresas, it was so cool to know that this beautiful range is one that very, very few Arizonans ever see. We made our way up and into the western end of the Teresas, ending the day at a beautiful, sandy spot in Fisher Canyon, just inside the northern border of the wilderness. We could have gone farther, but knowing we would have to hike another 8 miles before the next campsite possibility, we decided to burn the final hour of daylight and build up a good woodpile for the night.

Mon 29, GET #8 (~16mi/4700aeg, 10hr 36min)
If you are doing GET 8, there is something you should know — there are few trails. In fact, there is no trail or series of trails you can use to go from one end to the other; the only way to do so is to go from the west end to the north end, hike outside the wilderness for a while to the east and then drop back down, hiking south to the southeast end. Topo maps show a trail just outside the wilderness that once existed (they are marked on some topo maps as Black Rock and Cottonwood Mountain trails). Because of two ranchers in this area who I have been told have a particular dislike for visitors of any sort, you have to be really careful in this area. The Black Rock Trail goes onto one of the rancher's land now and cannot be hiked, and this rancher has let the Cottonwood Trail basically fade into nonexistence (as it is on his land now also). The only legal option is to hike a careful loop of about 8 miles out of the wilderness, around the boundaries of their properties, and back into the wilderness, doing some bushwhacking along the way. I actually attempted to find a way to contact these ranchers to ask permission for access beforehand, but was totally unsuccessful.

We started off talking up a storm and soon realized we were following the trail that leads to the ranch (and trouble). Lee boldly decided, rather than to backtrack, to instead bushwhack up a mountainside and back down to a road I was familiar with. The bushwhack was doable and saved us some otherwise useless miles, but it did in looking back on our track put us on one of these rancher's land for almost a mile. It was marked as a forest service road but is apparently an FS road that he also owns (my sincere apologies to the rancher). If you do GET 8, I recommend following the standard route in respect of the ranchers.

After getting this behind us, then the elevation was set to begin, with a climb to well over 7,200 feet near the peak of Cottonwood Mountain. We followed a pack trail up into the wilderness gate and headed toward Kane Spring, which is generally one of the few locations along the route with somewhat dependable water. We headed up the ridgeline, hitting consistent snow around 6,000 feet but thankfully not too deep (we were punching through only an inch or two). Nice views at the overlook on top, I spent some time myself soaking it in before jumping back into catching up with Lee (he was a man on a mission!). My plans were to get to a nice campsite in cottonwood & sycamore trees about 4 miles down the south side of the mountain (outside the Santa Teresa Wilderness), but we ended up pushing a mile beyond that since we had enough sunlight left, making it to a nice campsite right at the boundary of the Coronado National Forest.

Tue 30, GET #8-9 (~14mi/2500aeg, 5hr 30min)
This was the coldest morning of all, getting down into the 10s. My water bottles were literally next to me as I slept, and when I woke up they were frozen. I told Lee, I was especially eager to get up and going super early, and we started out before daylight. Once I got my soreness worked out, we were both hiking at a steady >4mph clip down trails and roads to finish GET #8 and start GET #9. Knowing how eager Lee was to cut the trip short, and my skinny self having had enough of a 40+ lb pack for 55 miles, I came up with a plan to drop the pack as we left Klondike Road. I knew there was a water cache site there for the GET and it would be easy for me to drive back and pick up with minimal time lost...and it would give me a chance to get my running legs on. :y: For those of you who know me, I find it hard to resist not jogging out the home stretch of any hike, particularly if it is downhill!! Plus, I knew GET #9 wasn't the most beautiful section, with a good amount of dirt road walking, so it wasn't a big deal to just bust out the last 8 miles and help a buddy get home a little earlier to his awesome doggies, which I had already met on a prior hike. :D

I jogged part of it, pausing to keep Lee in sight. This guy is amazing with a pack though, and he was able to pass me when we reached the final stretch that has the elevation and cross-country bushwhack to it! :wlift: By the time we we lost all trail and had to bushwhack a trail for ourselves up and over the Dick Peak ridgeline, through thick catsclaw, holly, cactus and manzanita, he was nowhere to be seen. Once I reached the cattle tank at the top of the ridgeline, there was an old trail that descended into a 4WD road and back down to the car.

My plan was to finish by 11:21am (when we started the first day), so that we would have a 3-day finish. I thought dropping my pack would ensure that for me, and Lee pretty much made it; but the final bushwhack added more time than I expected. No real trail and finding only 1 cairn and 1 piece of blue tape in a tree about halfway up, and I finished 26 minutes outside of my goal. It still was a great way to end this segment (the highlight of segment #9 for me), and is one of the things you have to be comfortable with on the GET — some parts are just cross-country and you have to feel comfortable blazing your own trail to a specific destination. Blisterfree (organizer of the GET) in most places like this has done a great job of blue-taping trees for added confidence — but you can't depend on that in every area. Total time on the trail: 31 hours 18 minutes, putting our average at 2 mph over the whole trip.

I have to tell you — if you are looking for remote, GET 8 is the place to be. Actually, with the entire trip, we never encountered a single person (except a few in vehicles on Aravaipa & Klondike Roads). Normally when doing GET 8, water is going to be an issue. One of the plus sides to doing this when we did was that there were recent rains and snow melting off the higher peaks, giving us all the water we needed.

Had a blast getting to know Lee better, lots of cool discussions about American & world history, religion, politics, and even his great taste I share in several alternative rock bands. Great stories from his service time in Afghanistan, & grateful for his service for all of us. : app :

One final reason to :y: for this trip: getting segments 8 & 9 done puts juanjaimeiii & I both at having completed the first 13 segments of the Grand Enchantment Trail, from Apache Junction to Morenci!

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Aravaipa Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
Flow down Aravaipa Creek was similar to what I've seen in my last 2 trips out here.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Cottonwood Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
Great flow for this area; recent rains definitely helped.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Fisher Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
Great flow for this area; recent rains definitely helped.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Fourmile Spring Quart per minute Quart per minute
Found about a quart a minute flowing near here.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Gardner Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
Great flow for this area; recent rains definitely helped.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Holdout Creek Medium flow Medium flow
Great flow for this area; recent rains definitely helped.

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Kane Spring Dripping Dripping
A few water sources here; found a side trail leading to a small makeshift tank to east of the trail just before the spring; it had some concrete blocks next to it and had a small supply of water. Also a larger camouflage tank. The spring itself I think was the spot on the other side of the trail but it was bolted closed and I didn't take the time to work to get into it and see how much water there was. There also was water heading up to Kane Spring, on the trail north of the spring, at the dam and a couple of other areas.

dry Lantern Tank Dry Dry
no dice even after rains in this area...

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Limestone Canyon Pools to trickle Pools to trickle
Found some small pools here. At this time, we saw less pools on this end of the wilderness than on the western end, where they were more plentiful, but a few existed here in the southeastern end.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Reef Tank 26-50% full 26-50% full
Was a little dirty, with all the other water sources we were fortunate enough to have, this wasn't needed. We ran into clean flowing water along the trail a tenth of a mile or so before the tank.
_____________________
"I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived." — Henry David Thoreau
8 archives
Dec 03 2014
avatar

 Guides 7
 Routes 54
 Photos 13,163
 Triplogs 577

59 female
 Joined Aug 19 2011
 Scottsdale, AZ
Aravaipa CanyonGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Dec 03 2014
outdoor_loverTriplogs 577
Backpack9.00 Miles 150 AEG
Backpack9.00 Miles3 Days         
150 ft AEG
 no routes
Partners none no partners
I'm not even sure how to tell you all about this Trip...It was just shy of Brilliant... :y:
It didn't matter where I was or what was happening, Fate was Smiling at me the whole Time...Between Luck, Good Decisions and Excellent Timing, I just couldn't go wrong... :y:

Day 1
I had left Town about 10:00 P.M. the Night before to get the Drive out of the Way. I was going in the East Side, but I knew I really didn't want to do the Water Crossings in the Dark. I knew of an Overlook about halfway in to Klondike. I had taken a Nap there before after driving a lot of the Night as well. So I stopped there, crawled in the Back Seat and took another Nap... :D

Woke up at Sunrise and started Shooting...It wasn't a Barn Burning type Sunrise by any means, but it was good enough and I had Compositions in every Direction...It was Sweet and a great way to start off the Trip.

I had decided to Park at the Main TH and Hike in to the TH at Turkey Creek. After a Pucker Moment crossing Cherry Creek some time ago, I didn't want to Risk it. And with a Chance of Rain in the Forecast, I didn't want to leave the Escape parked in Turkey Creek either... :sweat: I got to the Main TH, changed Clothes and got ready to go...Three very nice Gentlemen Birder/Photographers pulled up and generously offered me a Ride to Turkey Creek, which I accepted gladly... :DANCE: We hit it off right away and had a great time just driving to Turkey Creek, stopping occasionally for some good and some excellent Photo Ops...They were just going in for the Day, but we had so much fun, that we Hiked together in Aravaipa for awhile, enjoying more Photo Ops, before they turned around to go out. The Color was Peaking and there were a lot of Photo Ops to be had! :D

My Goal was to Hike in to Hell Hole Canyon, Camp at the Entrance and then do the Canyon the next day...I was basing my Campsite and my Plans on the Weather Report. Just before I left Tuesday Night, I checked and it was a 20% Chance of Rain, with MAYBE .5 Inches of Precipitation, all on Thursday, with clearing Friday and another chance on Saturday. So I was prepared for some Rain...If I had known how much I would really get, I would have Base Camped way back towards the Beginning in an elevated Alcove... :sweat: Anyway, I set up Camp and then went Downstream a bit more to check out the Entrance to Hell Hole and take some more Photos...

Day 2
The Rain started about 3 A.M. and didn't stop until almost 4 P.M. with over 1"+ of Precipitation... :sweat: I only had a Tarp large enough to cover the Bivy so to stay Dry, I either had to stay laying down, or put my Rain Gear on and sit in the Rain...I was prepared for SOME Rain, but not this... ](*,) By Noon, I realized that my Plans for Hell Hole Canyon were out. I was still completely socked in with no idea if it was going to clear up at all. Finally, I got about a 20 minute Window where it quit Raining entirely and I packed up, deciding that I was going back to the Alcove near the Beginning and Camp there that Night. That Way I could Cook and move around and stay completely Dry. It started Raining again as soon as I got underway... :sweat:

I packed the good Camera away in my Pack and just had my Waterproof one out for the Hike back. It was a good Decision to bring it...The Hike back had some great Photo Ops including Waterfalls coming down the Cliffs from above... :D The Creek had risen about 2 Inches, was running Brown and had more Current going by mid afternoon...I eventually got to the Alcove, set up Camp, and finally ate something before settling in for the Evening...The Alcove was in a Large Divot in the Canyon and the Divot Area had a small Waterfall going as well so I fell asleep to that nice Sound... :)

Day 3
Woke up to some Blue Skies overhead and a really nice Day...Took my Time packing up, explored the Divot a little bit since it went back a couple of hundred feet and then started back towards the TH. I was really surprised. All of the Waterfalls had stopped, the Creek had not only gone back down and cleared up, but the Level was actually lower than when I went in on Wednesday...Interesting.

I had thought about Hiking up Turkey Creek, spending Friday Night there and doing the Ruins and Oak Grove on Saturday before Hiking out. But with another Chance of Rain on Saturday and the Fact that my current Permit wouldn't cover the extra Day, I decided against it. But I did drop my Pack and wandered up Turkey Creek Road for a ways. The Rain had made a lot of Leaves Drop and everything was just carpeted with Fresh, undisturbed Leaves...It was awesome and the Photo Ops continued. The Clouds actually started building again and I finally turned around, picked up my Pack and headed for the Vehicle.

One the Drive out, I ran into some more Photo Ops :y: and then stayed in the Area to capture Sunset and...a Moonrise...Very Cool... :D Then I headed for the Barn, stopping in Superior for Mexican Food...

Amazing Trip...Peak Color, Wildlife, (3 Herds of Javelina, 2 Rafters of Wild Turkey and a lone Coatimundi not in a Pear Tree...), Waterfalls, and New Friends...Even with all that Weather, the Rain provided it's own set of Photo Ops that wouldn't have happened, so it was all very good and I was ecstatic with this Trip...

I will tell more with the Photos, but don't hold your Breath, it may be another couple of Days before I Post them. I wanted to get the Log posted though so the Foliage and Water Reports would go in...
Meteorology
Meteorology [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Moon
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Substantial
Probably hit it pretty much at Peak. The Rain on the 2nd Day and a Breeze the 3rd Day knocked some of it down, but there was still quite a bit of Color on the Trees in Spots when I left on 12/5

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Aravaipa Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
See Notes for Aravaipa Creek for this Date.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Aravaipa Creek Medium flow Medium flow
12/3 Creek Crossings driving into the East Side of Aravaipa Canyon were slightly Deeper than Normal. 12/4 Creek in Aravaipa Canyon rose about 2 Inches due to Rain for 13 Hours that Day. 12/5 Surprisingly, the Creek Level had not only gone down overnight, but was significantly lower than the Level was on 12/3....Creek Crossings driving out were also significantly shallower...

dry Deer Creek Dry Dry
Dry on 12/3, but after a lot of Rain on 12/4 that certainly would have changed, at least temporarily...

dry Parsons Canyon Dry Dry
Dry on 12/3, but after a lot of Rain on 12/4, that may have changed temporarily...

dry Turkey Creek Dry Dry
Dry on 12/3, Large Puddles on 12/5

_____________________
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty & well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, totally worn out & proclaiming, "Wow What a Ride!"
Nov 20 2014
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 Guides 4
 Routes 8
 Photos 159
 Triplogs 13

71 male
 Joined Mar 05 2011
 Florence, AZ
Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness - GET #7Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 20 2014
bensondkTriplogs 13
Hiking13.00 Miles 800 AEG
Hiking13.00 Miles   7 Hrs   45 Mns   1.68 mph
800 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I had forgotten about reading the analogy to the Grand Canyon, but had the same thought in mind just before starting this triplog. Of course, it is an overstatement to say it compared to the Grand Canyon, but it is still very exceptional when compared to any hike in the area. We made it a day hike, by going from the east trailhead in 6.5 miles to Booger Creek where we had lunch before making the return trek. One tip that you might find useful – be sure to make a note of where the trail coming in reaches the creek, because it is not that easy to spot on the way back.
The hike is very unusual with so much time actually spent hiking in the water, but the water became the highlight of the hike, and something I’m sure we all looked forward to as the day progressed.
We started at 9:00 AM, with temperatures in the 50s and found the water to be colder than we had expected. Although we didn’t measure water temperatures in the morning, we all found that the water was cold enough to have a numbing effect on our toes. By mid-day, the water had warmed up a surprising amount (did we just get used to it?) and we actually found it quite pleasant. If you are careful in choosing your path, water depth is almost always no deeper than mid-calf. If you were not so careful, and walked too close to a large rock, you could find water quite a bit deeper.
On the way back, we decided to investigate the abandoned lodge that is about half a mile from the trailhead. As we approached the lodge, a javelin ran across the trail. On a lucky guess, I readied my camera, and caught a picture of a second javelin crossing the same trail. It doesn’t seem common to find these fellows sticking around for pictures – this made my first in the wild.
Friends that were leading the hike said I should bring an old pair of running shoes that I don’t mind getting wet, so I did. The problem with this is that the shoes were old enough that there wasn’t a lot of support left, and by the end, both the sole and the uppers were about ready to give up. Also, with the lack of support compared to my hiking boots, my feet needed a day to recover. I wouldn’t have been practical to wear hiking boots, but a better shoe would certainly have been nicer. Whether the money spent on water shoes would be worth it depends on the individual.
In a few place, I found my GPS (Garmin Oregon 450) track became erratic, which was likely caused by being near steep cliffs which created a shadow from most of the satellites. It is something to keep in mind if you are using your GPS to keep track of distances, as the distances are likely to be overstated on your device.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation None
Trees were still green, with only the odd exception.
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average hiking speed 2.09 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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