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Reno Trail #62 - 8 members in 11 triplogs have rated this an average 4.3 ( 1 to 5 best )
11 triplogs
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May 28 2022
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 Guides 29
 Routes 329
 Photos 9,686
 Triplogs 920

40 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Reno Trail #62Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Backpack avatar May 28 2022
FOTGTriplogs 920
Backpack9.20 Miles 1,305 AEG
Backpack9.20 Miles2 Days         
1,305 ft AEG
 
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
I seem to spend a lot of Memorial Weekends in this area. However, it had been several years since I had spent a night in the Bear Wallow Wilderness. We kept the miles leisurely and went more for the dogs and to experience a nice day and pleasant evening along the creek. We took the generally cleared Reno Trail to Bear Wallow Creek Trail and then set up camp shortly after the confluence with the South Fork of Bear Wallow Creek. From there, we explored another mile or so down stream.

Reno Trail was in pretty good shape, with just a little winter deadfall here and there and we made quick time to the creek. The Bear Wallow Trail was generally clear, but some blow-downs here and there and some reroutes gave the trail a primitive charm. If the rains come, by July the poison ivy will be waist high and the raspberries will have re-claimed most of the trail, making it perhaps less pleasant. The creek's immediate ecosystem and the surrounding forest has rebounded nicely since the big fire and it was nice to see some substantive recovery since my last visit. Apart from our little excursion down stream, we spent most of our day napping, reading, snacking and enjoying the surroundings at our superb campsite, which was situated on a nice bench of grass among the conifers and along the creek. A little cascade and “deeper” pool of water inhabited by some shy Apache Trout near camp completed the idyllic setting.

We hiked out early on Sunday and returned the way we came to complete the perfect little overnight trip into the Bear Wallow Wilderness.
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Jul 17 2021
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 Routes 104
 Photos 1
 Triplogs 79

41 female
 Joined Oct 21 2016
 Tempe, AZ
Bear Wallow Trail #63Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 17 2021
MAPTriplogs 79
Hiking10.71 Miles 2,835 AEG
Hiking10.71 Miles   6 Hrs   21 Mns   1.75 mph
2,835 ft AEG      14 Mns Break
 
no photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
**My FINAL Arizona 20-20 Challenge hike** :y: and it couldn't have been a more perfect hike! After weeks of fires burning literally on all four sides of this hike and then a week of rainstorms, we enjoyed 6 1/2 hours of perfect temperatures and no visible smoke or really any signs of all the chaos that has been raging this unique area of Arizona.

My friend and I camped at KP Cienega Campground Friday night (She experienced hail & strong winds & a pretty bad storm driving from Phoenix. I left a couple hours after her & only got rain for a bit.) Woke up Saturday to clear skies & crisp temps (50's), and drove to Gobbler Point to drop a vehicle. The road out to Gobbler point was in pretty good shape (FS 8154?). There were some deep puddles but the road is rocky enough that getting stuck didn't seem to be an issue. There weren't any crazy rocks. I'm sure a car could make it if necessary but a truck or 4Runner would be much better choice.

We started from Reno Trail & it was a smooth easy hike down to Bear Wallow. The trail is in great shape. Once we got down to Bear Wallow trail, there were a few sections of overgrowth completely covering the trail but I think the growth may have just happened with all the rain. The trail was still easy to follow, even with all the plant cover. LOTS of raspberries. No wonder bears like to have out down there! LOTS of Aphrodite Fritillary Butterfly (I think this was the type of butterfly) on the Bee Balm blooms. It was pretty magical with all the butterflies surrounding us for much of the hike. Overall the trail was flat for most of the Bear Wallow portion and was nice dirt and easy to find. Water was flowing in Bear Wallow Creek the entire way with some deeper pools here and there. Toward the end (boundary of the White Mountain Apache Reservation) more and more poison ivy appeared along the trail and it was difficult for my friend with shorts on to avoid coming in contact with it. We did see the dead bear the previous triplog mentioned! They were very much in the decomposition process at this point. Their jaws were intact and part of their face around their jaws were covered in hair. Their was also a paw covered in hair that was still intact. It was a strange sight for sure. I can't imagine how this bear died but they didn't appear to be very big. It's hard to tell by a mostly decomposed body though.

We took the Gobbler Point trail up and it helped us work up a good sweat very quickly. I think the high was around 70 but definitely started to feel the humidity in this portion. Gobbler Point trail is not challenging to follow most of the way. There are a handful of areas with dead trees blocking the trail but it is easy enough to go over or around most of them. We saw a dead elk (I think) along this trail that looked more newly deceased then the bear. The elk's body parts were strewn along the trail. Lots of dead bodies along this hike! Also, a lot more visibly abundant life in the area so I guess the two go hand-in-hand. We lost Gobbler Point trail just before the final set of switchbacks. Looking at a satellite map now, I think that portion of the trail is visible but it is not in the same location the route shows. The trail seems to have been re-routed at some point. We only struggled for a few hundred feet though before finding the trail again. After such an easy day of hiking, Gobbler Point gave us just enough "up" & just enough struggle to feel like a true Arizona 20-20 hike. ;)
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max North Fork Bear Wallow Creek Medium flow Medium flow
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Jun 06 2020
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 Guides 7
 Routes 160
 Photos 701
 Triplogs 199

39 male
 Joined Nov 30 2015
 Phoenix, AZ
Bear Wallow Wilderness, AZ 
Bear Wallow Wilderness, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jun 06 2020
ShatteredArmTriplogs 199
Hiking10.27 Miles 2,017 AEG
Hiking10.27 Miles   4 Hrs   1 Min   2.56 mph
2,017 ft AEG
 
no photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Headed up to the White Mountains very early Saturday to do some car camping/adventuring with the usual suspects. Didn't have much of a plan, but I had scouted out a few places I was interested in, one of which was Bear Wallow. Someone mentioned it as a possibility (I didn't know how far they wanted to go from the Big Lake-ish campsite), so I of course said I'd been wanting to check it out.

The original plan was to go down Reno, down Bear Wallow, and then up Gobbler Point, and complete the loop using forest roads. Time was an obvious concern, as we didn't start until after 1pm. A couple of folks camping with us were only going to do a short hike down Reno, so they offered to move the car up to the Gobbler Point junction to eliminate running on FR25.

Reno trail was nice, actually very easy to follow. It seems like they're actually working these trails. The Bear Wallow junction is bearly (sorry) signed, and I think I was the only one who actually realized we changed trails. Super lush down there, lots of green vegetation, random seeps, etc. Was impressed.

Got to a really burned area near where the south fork comes in. I think this may be where the Wallow Fire started, from what I can ascertain. The rest of the canyon was mostly unharmed.

We got off trail at one point near a bad washout; I think where the trail exited on the opposite side got completely erased. So we were in the creek making slow progress for a half mile or so. Got a little worried we wouldn't make it out before dusk at that rate, but after a half hour or so of nonsense, we stumbled on the trail again. Easygoing after that.

Topped off the water at what looked like some old dam. Not sure what it was for, but it's not doing much good now. The water was deep and very enticing below it, though.

Gobbler Point junction would be next to impossible to find without GPS or topo map skills. Once on the trail, though, it's pretty easy to follow until you get to the burn area a half mile or so before the top. It seemed to just disappear at that point, so we just went straight up, and found the trail again a hundred feet or so up. This burned area provided the best views of the day, but the thorny crap that grows in the burned areas could really use a trim.

When we got to Gobbler Point, we found that the car had been dropped off all the way at the trailhead, saving us another 3-4 miles of road. Everybody was absolutely thrilled about this development.
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Jun 17 2017
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 Guides 29
 Routes 329
 Photos 9,686
 Triplogs 920

40 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Reno Trail #62Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 17 2017
FOTGTriplogs 920
Hiking7.53 Miles 2,088 AEG
Hiking7.53 Miles   4 Hrs   25 Mns   1.96 mph
2,088 ft AEG      35 Mns Break
 
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
I had not been to Bear Wallow in a long time and I was interested in seeing how the area was looking and its trails. We started early to beat the heat and chose the Reno Trail to reach Bear Wallow Creek.

Reno has a little deadfall, but is generally in great shape and probably one of the best trails for reaching Bear Wallow Creek right now. After reaching the intersection of Bear Wallow Trail, we continued to the confluence of the north and south fork of Bear Wallow Creek. Bear Wallow Trail needs some work and there is poison ivy everywhere, however, the area is still scenic and it seems to be recovering. After hiking back to the trailhead, we walked the road up to the Reno fire tower.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Reno Spring Quart per minute Quart per minute
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Jun 29 2014
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 Guides 8
 Routes 12
 Photos 1,317
 Triplogs 491

57 male
 Joined Nov 15 2005
 Jackson, CA
Bear Wallow Trail #63Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 29 2014
toddakTriplogs 491
Hiking17.50 Miles 3,000 AEG
Hiking17.50 Miles   8 Hrs   30 Mns   2.06 mph
3,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Very cool that the main canyon was spared the ravages of the Wallow Fire. Good flow in the creek below the springs, unfortunately there were several cows roaming the canyon, with lots of patties everywhere, so carry lots or carefully purify. Climbed out of the canyon north up Gobbler Point #59 (fairly easy to follow except the top half mile or so which is choked with downed trees), road walked back east a few miles and dropped back down into the canyon on Reno #62, then back up and out to the trailhead. Very nice canyon, except for the hordes of flies and gnats that hover right in front of your face, try to get in your eyes and get sucked into your throat.
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May 31 2014
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 Guides 84
 Routes 700
 Photos 17,531
 Triplogs 1,704

49 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Rose Schell Reno Bear Wallow, AZ 
Rose Schell Reno Bear Wallow, AZ
 
Backpack avatar May 31 2014
chumleyTriplogs 1,704
Backpack16.51 Miles 3,711 AEG
Backpack16.51 Miles3 Days         
3,711 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Lee offered to drive, and since you can get to Rocky Point, San Diego, LA, Durango, and a few other places in less time, that was a welcome offer.

Having never been to this part of the White Mountains, I was intrigued. Especially after the fire. Some of the ridgelines were moonscape, but a very surprising part of the fire area are untouched, or only affected a little bit. Borderline healthy. In the moonscape areas, the aspens are growing strong with thick stands now 5-10 feet tall. In not too many years, these areas will be fantastic!

After playing Elk Pinball on the Coronado Hwy at dusk, we arrived at the Rose Spring TH and crashed there for the night. In the morning we headed out on the Rose Spring trail and were a little frustrated by the unanticipated elevation gains. It hurt a little bit to get out to the Schell junction. Which btw, is impossible to find if you don't have a track. The upper drainage has no noticeable route, and the sign is mostly burned.

Once headed down Schell, the route becomes evident, and the canyon is a real pleasant hike. The slope is perfect, and the foliage makes for a shaded, scenic trip. There's a fantastic grassy camp spot at the junction with the South Fork Bear Wallow Creek, which is also where the first water appeared for us. Just over half a mile later we reached the confluence of the north and south forks where they create the main stem of Bear Wallow Creek.

We set up camp a few hundred yards downstream of the confluence. After a short break, we headed up the north fork one mile to the junction with the Reno Trail where we ascended 2 miles to the road. The Reno trail is a gem! A nice moderate grade is an easy hike from the road to Bear Wallow Creek the lower half of which is shaded in pines with running water in the creek, and the upper half which is in burn area with well-established new aspen.

At the road, we hiked the additional half mile to the lookout tower. The views were great, but a little stunning. Looking north, as far as you could see, the landscape was affected by the Wallow Fire in 2011. Only Baldy to the northwest was untouched. On the horizon, the hills around Greer and Escudilla were torched. The fire began within a couple miles of this tower, and these landmarks are 30 miles away. All torched. That's a lot of land!

Even though Lee wanted to hike an additional 9-10 miles (depending on how we cut the switchbacks in the road) to make a loop back to camp, I decided I'd rather get back before dark and enjoy the beer I had left in the creek. Had I not been there to wuss out, I'm sure he would have done the extra miles on his own. But I value some relaxation time when I'm backpacking, and getting to camp after dark isn't my first choice. Unless that's the original plan.

Back at camp, we cooked up dinner, spent some fun time under the party lights, and retired for the night.

Sunday we hiked out via the South Fork canyon. There was an occasional wildlife trail, but for the most part we hiked in the creek, which had water in it all the way to where we headed up a very steep ridge toward the trailhead.

If I were to do it again, I might skip the Rose Spring trail, and drop into the creek via our exit route. It is steep but short, and cuts a few miles off the hike. But you have to be prepared for a very steep, off-trail hillside until you get to the creek.

Nice weekend with good people. Never been this far south in the White Mtns. I will surely be back.

Note: Bear Wallow Creek is the king of Poison Ivy. I've never seen so much PI in Arizona anywhere. Including Vasey's Paradise! The lower stretches of Schell, South Fork, and Reno also have poison ivy growing wildly along the trail. As a crazy-allergic poison ivy person, I prepared ahead of time and hiked with "dirty" clothes. As soon as I got to camp, I changed clothes and kept all my gear clear. Sleeping bag, tent, backpack, etc. The "dirty" clothes went in a ziploc bag and straight in the washer at home. I also scrubbed with Technu and rinsed in the creek. It'll be another day before I know for sure, but I think I came out of it all clear. Knock on wood.
Flora
Flora [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Poison Ivy
Meteorology
Meteorology [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Fire Burn Area & Recovery
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two scoops!
May 30 2014
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 Guides 29
 Routes 329
 Photos 9,686
 Triplogs 920

40 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Rose Spring Trail #309Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Backpack avatar May 30 2014
FOTGTriplogs 920
Backpack18.35 Miles 3,711 AEG
Backpack18.35 Miles3 Days         
3,711 ft AEG
 
Partners partners
chumley
I returned to Bear Wallow Wilderness this weekend with two friends, Chumley and Kim. We left Tempe at about 2:30 and were arriving at Rose Spring TH right around eight. I know as Chumley pointed out around hour two or three into the drive that there are comparable areas closer to Phoenix. However, I fell in love with the area last year and had been dying to get back. The remoteness of the area, lack of people and its historical connections to Leopold and his old stomping grounds is just enough to keep me coming back to this area.

I really had no solid plan. I had nixed my original plan to visit Pacheta Falls via Gobbler Point and a long off trail route earlier in the week, so I was content with just a nice trip into the wilderness and a little exploring. Took in some nice view along the rim, before dropping down Schell Canyon Trail into the narrow wilderness area. Nobody was smoked, but I think the general consensus was the rolling grade of the first three miles or so of Rose Spring coupled with hovering around 9000 feet certainly got the heart going early in the morning. We ended up making camp off Bear Wallow Trail, from there we headed up Reno Trail to the fire tower.

The Reno Trail did not disappoint. We saw what most of us agreed were perhaps a few of the largest Pine we have seen in the state, along with a quaint little spring area, and a flowing side drainage that was surprisingly still pushing a lot of water to feed Bear Wallow Creek and ultimately the Black River. Signs of the fire were few in this area. The lookout tower offered some spectacular and sobering views of the surrounding countryside. Chumley hammed it up with the watch tower guy for a bit while I finished off my lunch and Kim enjoyed the views. We returned the same route we took to the tower.

The rest of the evening included scrubbing our bodies in an attempt to remove any lingering urisol oils courtesy of the relatively thick in spots dreaded poison ivy we encountered in several spots. We then just enjoyed a picturesque "backpacker magazine" spot along the creek, had some dinner, chatted a little and kind of half crashed around 7 or 8 for myself..

The next morning Kim and I explore further down the creek a little while Chumley packed up. We opted for an off trail route to reach the TH. Rather than Schell Canyon to Rose Spring, we opted for the route the crow flies. We headed up the South Fork of Bear Wallow Creek until reaching the most obvious X-fill route and then headed up a steep but manageable ridge line to the road leading to Rose Spring TH completing our loop. The South Fork decision proved to be a great one, as we came across a few picturesque area and the hiking proved to be pretty standard off-trail creek hiking.

Final Notes: Was happy to complete Reno Trail as it lead to a 100% completion percentage for myself in Bear Wallow Wilderness. I can now legitimately say I hiked (not linked ;) ) every mile of trail in Bear Wallow Wilderness, my first fully completed wilderness area.

Disclaimer I know the kind of guy Chumley is, he will almost certainly blame his poison ivy on my dogs, however, remember it was not the dog's decision to wear shorts on Saturday despite several warnings.
Flora
Flora [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Poison Ivy
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] HAZ Food
Meteorology
Meteorology [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Fire - Wildfire
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2 archives
Jul 21 2012
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 Guides 19
 Routes 40
 Photos 5,624
 Triplogs 341

49 female
 Joined Nov 22 2005
 Tucson, AZ
Bear Wallow Trail #63Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Backpack avatar Jul 21 2012
writelotsTriplogs 341
Backpack9.20 Miles 1,300 AEG
Backpack9.20 Miles2 Days         
1,300 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Partners none no partners
I lead a group of beginning and intermediate backpackers into the Bear Wallow wilderness for a one night backpacking trip. We camped before the hike at the gravel pit on FR 25 on the way out to the Reno Trailhead (where we left our shuttle vehicle). It wasn't an ideal spot for a hammocker, but it was great for tents. High and dry - and if you wanted a sky show, it'd be a great spot. Of course, it rained for us, so no show.

The hike was delightful. See photos for more detail, but to sum up, the area is not nearly as devastated as you might think given the severity of last year's Wallow Fire. Though we passed through many bad burn areas, there was lots of new growth, especially ferns, aspens and wildflowers. The Rose Spring and Schell Canyon trails had not been cleared since the burn, but there weren't many downed trees or badly washed out places. The group of beginners was able to keep to the trail and didn't once complain about obstacles (other than being a little sooted up).

There was a maintenance crew on the Bear Wallow trail, and they'd entered on the Reno Trail, so those two routes were in really good shape. The canyon bottom was beautiful, and though there were signs of the fire, overall it was a lush, green wildflower haven. I'd definitely go back in a heart-beat!

My crew was fantastic - they were good-natured, happy and fun. I'd only ever hiked with one of them before, so it could have been much worse! Only one of the group had any trouble at all, and his was more an issue of learning about lighter gear than anything else. I bet that giant sleeping bag has already been replaced!

I was staying with my mom at Hon Dah, so on the way home I took the Three Forks Road. Really nice drive - beautiful scenery and a smooth road. Next time I'll go that way rather than detouring all the way through Springerville!

It's great to be back on the trail!
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Moderate

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max North Fork Bear Wallow Creek Medium flow Medium flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max South Fork Bear Wallow Creek Light flow Light flow
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Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.- Barack Obama
Sep 13 2010
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 Guides 4
 Photos 2,750
 Triplogs 400

57 male
 Joined Nov 13 2005
 Cave Creek, AZ
Reno Trail #62Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 13 2010
cabelTriplogs 400
Hiking6.00 Miles 1,120 AEG
Hiking6.00 Miles   3 Hrs      2.00 mph
1,120 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Thoreau
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All who wander are not lost...just me.
Sep 13 2010
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 Routes 10
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 679

male
 Joined Mar 10 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Reno Trail #62Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 13 2010
ThoreauTriplogs 679
Hiking6.00 Miles 1,120 AEG
Hiking6.00 Miles
1,120 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
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1 archive
Jul 09 2005
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 Photos 2
 Triplogs 35

67 male
 Joined Sep 06 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Reno Trail #62Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 09 2005
pammnpsjTriplogs 35
Hiking4.40 Miles 1,120 AEG
Hiking4.40 Miles   3 Hrs   15 Mns   1.35 mph
1,120 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
1.7 miles on Reno trail and 2.5 on road back to car, after tr#63
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average hiking speed 1.95 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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