username
X
password
register help
GuidesRoutes
 
Photosets
 
 Comments
triplogs   photosets   labels comments more
North Fork KP Trail #93 - 5 members in 13 triplogs have rated this an average 2.6 ( 1 to 5 best )
13 triplogs
  All Months
13 Triplogs
Jan
0
Feb
0
Mar
0
Apr
1
May
3
Jun
3
Jul
1
Aug
4
Sep
0
Oct
1
Nov
0
Dec
0
 

Aug 01 2020
friendofThundergod
avatar

 Guides 24
 Routes 300
 Photos 8,562
 Triplogs 806

38 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
North Fork KP Trail #93Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 01 2020
friendofThundergod
Hiking7.00 Miles 1,600 AEG
Hiking7.00 Miles
1,600 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
I made one more quick trip to the Blue Range before school starts back up with Katie and a few of our friends. We were mainly there to camp and sight see, but we got some hiking in too.

I hiked the first mile and a half of the North Fork Trail the day before to make sure it was at least in reasonable shape. After determining the trail was definitely passable and not that bad, I decided we would take advantage of the fact we had multiple vehicles and do a North Fork-South Fork hike of the KP Creek drainage.

As mentioned earlier, the North Fork Trail was in decent shape and we made good time to the confluence and “falls.” We took an extended break at the falls and then headed up the south fork. The bottom 2 plus miles are getting overgrown and the deadfall is piling up down there, but the final mile to KP Cienega was great.

The North Fork proved to be a great option and I found the trail in better shape and it to be more enjoyable this time around vs my last time on the trail in 2014. In fact, I would recommend the North Fork Trail for trips to the confluence until the South Fork Trail is properly cleared. If you want to see the meadow and best parts of the South Fork Trail right now, just hike the first mile and turn around. There is good raspberry picking along these trails right now.
Flora
Flora
Red Raspberry

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max K P Tank 1-25% full 1-25% full

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max KP South Fork - KP Confluence Light flow Light flow
_____________________
Jul 01 2017
nonot
avatar

 Guides 93
 Routes 236
 Photos 2,001
 Triplogs 477

male
 Joined Nov 18 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
KP Trail #70Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 01 2017
nonot
Hiking12.00 Miles 1,200 AEG
Hiking12.00 Miles
1,200 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
KP South Fork, KP North Fork, Ackre Lake, then trying to loop out.

KP South and North Fork are clear of downed trees and the forest service continues to work on erosion control on these trails. In general these seemed to be in fairly good shape and I saw a trail crew when hiking, so the FS is continuing to try to improve the conditions.

Water in both forks and flowing nicely near the confluence. It dries up quickly moving up North Fork.

Ackre Lake is a lovely little pond, probably my favorite find of the trip. Trying to make a recommended loop out of Ackre lake proved a horrible decision, but I did make it back to the highway.
Fauna
Fauna
Mule Deer
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Moderate

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Aker Lake 76-100% full 76-100% full
_____________________
http://hikearizona.com/garmin_maps.php

Hike Arizona it is full of sharp, pointy, ankle-twisting, HAZmaster crushing ROCKS!!
Hike Arizona it is full of sharp, pointy, shin-stabbing, skin-shredding plants!
Hike Arizona it is full of striking, biting, stabbing, venomous wildlife!
3 archives
Jun 21 2014
friendofThundergod
avatar

 Guides 24
 Routes 300
 Photos 8,562
 Triplogs 806

38 male
 Joined Jan 21 2013
 AZ
Blue Range Primitive Area, AZ 
Blue Range Primitive Area, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Jun 21 2014
friendofThundergod
Backpack41.79 Miles 9,841 AEG
Backpack41.79 Miles3 Days         
9,841 ft AEG
 
Made another pilgrimage east to the Apache-Sitgreaves, more specifically the Primitive Blue Range area, or as my map says the Blue Range Wilderness and Primitive Area. However, even the latter is a bit of a misnomer, as currently the Blue Range has not achieved wilderness status in the eyes of Congress and to this day remains the last "primitive" designated area in the United States. Not sure what any of that means, however, anyone who knows me, knows that I would have a natural attraction to any area with the word primitive in its title. Similarly, since my first visit about a year ago, this area has really intrigued me. It was in this are that Aldo Leopold (arguably the founding father in American conservationism and ecology) obtained his first position working under the federal forest service. Leopold saw much in his day, he spoke fondly of the "mountain" in fact, one of his most famous written works, "Thinking Like a Mountain" is based off of his expediences in and around Escudilla and the Escudilla Wilderness area. So the question for me: could I find what gravitated Leopold to this area and transformed him into perhaps America's first conservationists, but 100 years later and after the greatest forest fire the Southwest has seen in contemporary times? Spoiler alert the answer is a resounding yes!

A chance encounter with a game warden around 10:00 p.m. on Friday changed my plans slightly for the three days. He had personally just conducted a "shocking" and fish count of Grant Creek and gave me some pointers on where all the trout were congregated. However, if I were to hit these areas, I would have to modify my original route of Grant Creek Trail which stays high above the creek until crossing around the lower elevations where the Game Warden officer told me all the fish had been killed or can no longer exist due to warmer water temps caused by the destroying of their natural shade and the naturally warmer water at lower elevations. So from the intersection of trails #76 Foot Creek and #75 Grant Creek I took trail #306 down to Grant Creek and decided I would just fish and hike the whole stream length off-trail to its southern intersection with trail #75. If the fishing and beauty of Grant Creek were not as great as they were, this might have turned out to be a negative experience. Movement down stream was very slow at times, however, as I stated earlier the fishing was amazing and the creek beautiful so it negated the slow moving pace of boulder hoping, and down climbing water falls complete with three day pack and pole in hand, oh and along with keeping Blanco floating and upright through some of the deeper pools and obstacles. From there I made good time to the Blue River, passed through a little bit of civilization as I walked the forest road that connected my ambitious loop. I took the first opportunity to camp at a place marked the "box" on my map. This was one of first areas where there were not a dozen no trespassing signs or signs proclaiming the owner's willingness to shoot me if I stepped foot on their property. Day one turned out to be a little over 17 miles, camping was nice, but not spectacular, ate well, slept well.

I thought day 2 would be a much easier day, however, that did not turn out to be necessarily true, thanks in part to some of my decision making. I hate to give a negative trail description, because with trails everyone has their own opinions, and I would not want to steer someone away from an area. However, Steeple Trail #73 is probably a trail one could leave off their to do list for the time being. The upper sections of the trail have really been damage by fire and the trip across KP Mesa is enough to make one yearn for a very quick change of scenery. However, that is simply not the case as you seem to hike forever to simply cross KP Mesa's fire damaged landscape where one can easily see areas that suffered 100 percent devastation from fire. From Steeple Trail #73 I took trail #70 into the KP Creek area. However, this trail got no better! In fact, I will give a fair warning, if you do not have a G.P.S route for this trail or sound topo reading skills, I would avoid this section of trail all together. One can safely say to some degree that this trail ceases to exist in several spots, littered with dead fall, washed out and very faint in the good spots. Nevertheless, we were doing just fine, traversing the several drainages leading to K.P. when I had the great decision to cut a mile or so off route and explore some off-trail sections of K.P. Creek. The whole situation reminded me of something my friend Jim always says when I am pondering short-cuts and more direct off trail routes. He always says, "if that way is shorter or easier, that would be the way." Well in this case that held to be 100% true. I could tell from cliffs along opposite side of creek that there was potential for not being able to cut down to creek and man did that hold true, cliffed out once, then took a side drainage only to come to an impassible pour-over so intimidating that I did not even snap a photo, Blanco and I finally broke through down about a 4-5 foot wide scree shoot, hit the creek where Blanco drank profusely and I silently chastised myself. One would think at this stage in the game I was done making those kind of mistakes, but something tells me that won't be the last time. We slowly made our way up the lower section of K.P Creek where the trail is a little tough to follow and made camp at a superb location.

The final day was just an easy hike up K.P. Creek to K.P. Rim Trail, back to the upper section of Steeple Trail and back to the TH. Everything on this hike went well except finding my short connector trail to complete my K.P. Rim loop. Similar to the hike description, the turn-off for the trail is very hard to find and the forest fire certainly did not make it any easier. In fact, the author wrote had we not had the route downloaded we would have never found the turn-off. Unfortunately, the author failed to post "said" route to description, I guess his way of adding a little excitement for the next guy, we found it but you are on your own I guess. After accepting defeat I was reserved to back-track and make the less than 2 mile trek down 191 to my TH. However, this whole thought was leaving a bitter taste in my mouth, almost like a surrender, or a walk of shame in my mind. First a small voice contemplated just going off-trail the whole way until I found something to walk on. However, this voice was quickly drowned out by about 1000 sane other voices in my head who still had yesterday's folly fresh in their minds and they quickly and probably for the better got that thought out of my head. I then looked down and could clearly see the meadow I needed to get to, but no trail to get there. I said to myself I will go exactly .25 miles to meadow look for Steeple Trail #73, if I don't find, I turn right around. As luck would have it, after about 100 feet off trail I ran into my long lost connector trail.

The trail now ran in a complete opposite direction of the trail featured on my G.P.S! Oh well no time to curse and dwell, I was happy to be on trails and heading back to car, went through some pretty bad burnt out sections, but oddly enough found some beauty in them. Whether it was the stubborn trees that refused to burn or the half million or so 5 to 15 feet tall Aspen blowing fiercely in the wind and the numerous reinvigorated meadows and cienegas, I found beauty in it all.

Even with the adventure in finding my connector trail, Blanco and I still hit TH by 11:30 in morning.

Final Notes:

HAZ Appreciation I used a hike description from Arizonaed written in 2004 and it turned out to be pretty much spot on. Which is something to say, as he obviously wrote pre-Bear Wallow Fire. Route might need some small adjustments, but overall great hike description!
Geology
Geology
Mud
Named place
Named place
Aker Lake
_____________________
2 archives
Apr 11 2012
JuanJaimeiii
avatar

 Routes 566
 Photos 7,971
 Triplogs 1,704

53 male
 Joined Jan 30 2011
 Chandler, AZ
Bear Wallow Trail #63Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 11 2012
JuanJaimeiii
Hiking16.50 Miles 2,547 AEG
Hiking16.50 Miles   5 Hrs   53 Mns   2.80 mph
2,547 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
Up in the Apache-Sitgreaves NF again working on my hikes. This time I set out to do Bear Wallow and was really unsure what to expect. It is the point of origin of the infamous Wallow Fire of 2011. I was actually pleasantly surprised. The burn affected only about a third of the area where hike takes place.

On the way down as you follow the stream the area is torched bad! Once at North Fork which is a mile and a half in you make a turn and head West. It is here that it was much less burned than I had expected. The water was flowing strong as the snow continues to melt. Black suit could be seen on the side of the creek but the water was mostly clear. As I progressed I came across 5 wild turkeys, a couple elk and a small group of cattle. No fish were spotted in the stream.

Continuing on I made several creek/river crossings and I gave up on trying to cross by boulder hopping. It was just too deep and it made more sense to wade across. The water wasn't really that cold which was also a surprise. Basically I hiked about 14 miles of the trip in wet shoes and socks. Normally this wouldn't be so great but I figured it was good training for the upcoming Paria River Canyon Hike.

The turn around point is at the Apache National Forest Boundary. Per the book there was supposed to be a fence at the line. I walked right on by and didn't see it. Once I looked at the GPS watch and realized I had gone a quarter mile into the Apache side I turned back. On my return I saw the posted sign and was able to find the fence. It is mostly gone or down due to fallen trees. If you should hike this one it is easy to miss the finish line. No worries because the trail quickly fades to nothing beyond the boundary.

Per the register I was the second person of 2012 to hike this one but I am sure I won't be the last. Really great hike if you enjoy hiking next to a stream and/or a river. Don't let the fire damage keep you away. There is still much beauty to behold and a great trail to enjoy!
_____________________
Oct 09 2011
RickVincent
avatar

 Guides 4
 Routes 5
 Photos 3,366
 Triplogs 680

51 male
 Joined Aug 20 2009
 Mesa, AZ
North Fork KP Trail #93Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 09 2011
RickVincent
Hiking3.00 Miles 1,230 AEG
Hiking3.00 Miles   2 Hrs      1.50 mph
1,230 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Anna and I drove 35 miles south down the Coronado Trail hoping to get beyond the Wallow Fire burn area for a hike. Although there are still a few patches of beauty, most of the trip was through burnt wilderness. Thought maybe the KP area might have been spared since it is East of the highway. My conclusion: This area is not fit for human consumption. Blackened trees both downed and still standing are everywhere. The trail is overgrown with catclaw. The creek beds look ripped up due to excess flooding. We hiked in about 1.5 miles hoping the situation would get better as we traveled east. No such luck. The skies started to gray and then it started to snow. Anna had a hard fall on a rough part of the trail. She cut up her knee pretty good, but nothing serious. I decided not to continue to the confluence and waterfalls. Returned the way we came. The snow had stopped, but started to fall again as we reached the truck back at the trailhead. Best to avoid this place for awhile. Shame that a couple of careless idiots caused this whole mess.
_____________________
This is my gym. I have to travel down a bumpy road to get there. There are no treadmillls, no machines, and no personal trainers. I walk..I run..I breathe the fresh air. I can go any time I want, as much as I want and there is no membership fee.
May 30 2011
GrottoGirl
avatar

 Guides 3
 Routes 311
 Photos 11,581
 Triplogs 1,356

45 female
 Joined Sep 18 2009
 Tucson, AZ
Hannagan Meadow Grant/KP Creek LoopAlpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Backpack avatar May 30 2011
GrottoGirl
Backpack36.00 Miles 7,401 AEG
Backpack36.00 Miles4 Days         
7,401 ft AEG39 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
Great trip, however there were definitely some forces of evil working against me. Maybe it has something to do with starting the trip just off the "Devil's Highway".

Day 1: We started at the KP North Fork trail and continued on the KP Trail for about 5.5 miles. About 3 miles in, my camera went crashing to the ground after taking pictures of poison ivy. Camera Lens Error... So much for carrying about 1 pound of extra accessories for my camera. Canon PowerShot S5 IS - you were the BOMB! RIP!

We did find a good campsite along KP Creek and the temperatures were just right for sleeping!

Day 2: Great day, but really long (12 - 13 miles). We got great views of Sawed Off Mountain and the surrounding area. The trail along the KP and Steeple Mesas is very rocky with very little shade. If the view at the end of the mesa looking down in the lower part of KP canyon wasn't so awesome I'd have a hard time recommending this hike. I got to test out my birthday present, the Solar Dome Umbrella. Really awesome when there is no shade! Too bad it didn't protect me against heat rash on the backs of my legs. We did spend a fair amount of time relaxing in and near the Blue River. It was very nice to cool off!

As we walked between the Steeple trail and the Grant Creek trail along a dirt road I found my next dream job: Postal Worker at Blue, Arizona. The office is only open 3 times a week - sweet!

We again found another great campsite about a half mile from the Grant Creek TH. I had a special treat - I saw a javalina near camp.

Day 3: We hiked up long a ridge where you could look down in to part of Grant Creek Canyon. The view of the Red Saddles was pretty cool.

We hiked through Paradise Park - the devil had been there in 2010 and burned the heck out of the area. However, the elk had been working hard on trying to spread out some fertilizer to help promote revegetation. We ended up camping between Paradise Park and the Grant Cabin Trail Jxn. This area had also been burned but all the Ponderosa Pines had survived. I just did some research and found that the Paradise fire had been caused by a lightning strike on June 7, 2010. At this campsite, it was impossible to maintain any cleanliness. In fact, I still have dirty hands! That day it was windy and many of us either saw or heard trees going down not to far away.

Joel and I decided to go down the Grant Cabin trail to check out that area in case there might be good campsites for the future. On the way down, there was one section where it was burnt to a crisp and there was like an inferno heat. Half way down a gust of wind came up and branches from a live tree came flying towards us. When we were down near the Cabin, the wind just wouldn't stop. I was off looking around and heard a crash. I got back to where Joel was by the creek and he told me he saw a live tree go down not far from him. The wind was howling like out of a scary movie! That was probably the most scared I've been while in the wilderness. I felt the need hurry back up the trail to our camp. In total that day we did between 10 - 11 miles.

Day 4: We got started at about 6:30 AM. We were smelling smoke as we were ascending up to P Bar Lake. Half way through the ascent we could see smoke coming up a neighboring canyon that had connected with ours. It was impossible to tell where the fire was so we made sure we didn't slow down. We hurried up to P Bar Lake where the smoke wasn't as obvious and took a break. As we hiked out the temperature seemed to keep dropping which help speed us up! We completed our 5.5 miles before 10 AM. As we left the Blue, we saw a lot of fire fighting equipment (trucks, planes, etc). We learned at a gas station that the Wallow fire had started.

Overall, awesome trip. It will be nice to return in a few years to see how the forest changes after the fires. Too bad I won't have a bunch of photos to use for comparison. Maybe next time, the evil forces will leave me alone!
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max White Oak Spring Quart per minute Quart per minute
Both Rubbermaid troughs were full and some water was spilling out onto the ground.
_____________________
May 30 2011
RedwallNHops
avatar

 Guides 1
 Routes 10
 Photos 446
 Triplogs 1,148

45 male
 Joined Dec 22 2003
 Tucson, AZ
Hannagan Meadow Grant/KP Creek LoopAlpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Backpack avatar May 30 2011
RedwallNHops
Backpack36.00 Miles 7,401 AEG
Backpack36.00 Miles4 Days         
7,401 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
May 23 2011
Lost
avatar

 Routes 22
 Photos 416
 Triplogs 67

37 male
 Joined Apr 18 2009
 Anthem, AZ
North Fork KP Trail #93Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar May 23 2011
Lost
Hiking4.92 Miles 1,600 AEG
Hiking4.92 Miles   3 Hrs      1.97 mph
1,600 ft AEG      30 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Started down the trail about 9:30. Didn't see another person the entire hike. Weather was windy, but otherwise clear and comfortable. Being down in the canyon for nearly all of the hike, the wind really isn't that bad on the ground. What you do notice is the countless downed trees along the trail. It's not that bad going downhill, but a pain when you're coming back. I heard four or five trees creaking in the wind like they were ready to fall, so watch where you camp. The trail was somewhat faint, but still easy to follow. The two waterfalls were very nice, and there are good places to have lunch at the base of each one. Definitely a beautiful place i'll come back to, but i'll probably try the south trail next time.
_____________________
Aug 23 2009
keepmoving
avatar

 Guides 34
 Routes 242
 Photos 2,116
 Triplogs 569

34 male
 Joined Aug 16 2006
 Portland, OR
North Fork KP Trail #93Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 23 2009
keepmoving
Hiking5.00 Miles 1,600 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles
1,600 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
michellancholy
We arrived at the empty trail head parking lot shortly before 10:30am and had the trail to ourselves for our entire hike. The original plan had been to take a two day backpacking trip along the KP trail into the Blue Range Wilderness, but persistent storms persuaded us to alter our plans. Instead we planned to take the North Fork KP Trail to the South Fork KP Trail and then hitchhike or walk along 191 back to our truck, but a sudden storm forced us to turn back along the North Fork KP Trail.

North Fork KP Trail is absolutely spectacular and doesn't feel like it belongs in Arizona as it wanders through a dense forest where dew soaked ferns and raspberry bushes overgrow the trail. Although difficult to reach, the falls at the confluence of the north and south forks of KP Creek are spectacular and well worth the hike.
_____________________
Aug 23 2009
michellancholy
avatar

 Guides 1
 Triplogs 54

36 female
 Joined Nov 11 2008
 Tucson, AZ
North Fork KP Trail #93Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 23 2009
michellancholy
Hiking4.80 Miles 1,600 AEG
Hiking4.80 Miles   4 Hrs      1.20 mph
1,600 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
keepmoving
Hit the trail around 10:30. I couldn't believe the lushness of the area. I am a native Tucsonan and to me, Mt Lemmon is about as green as I am used to seeing things. We were at the confluence of the two creeks almost before we knew it. We hiked down the the stream from the trail and then back upstream in search of the two waterfalls. I enjoyed the stream crossings that were required to get to the falls more than the actual falls themselves, to be honest.
Just as we were deciding which trail to take back to the car, the clouds closed in and it started pouring. We decided not to push our luck and headed back the way we came, wearing ridiculous emergency ponchos. It was a bit of a slog back up the trail with the mud and the dead fall, but there were tons of raspberry bushes along the way. Stopping occasionally to search for berries was a nice way to take a little break from the constant uphill push.
_____________________
Aug 02 2008
Vaporman
avatar

 Guides 2
 Routes 4
 Photos 8,687
 Triplogs 931

41 male
 Joined Mar 28 2005
 SLC, Utah
KP Rim LoopAlpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 02 2008
Vaporman
Hiking15.00 Miles 3,800 AEG
Hiking15.00 Miles   11 Hrs   15 Mns   1.33 mph
3,800 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
I did a little bit different variation loop hike than posted. I went from the KP Rim TH thru the semi-burned ridge, but continued straight on the Steeple trail down the creek and then swung right around the rim into KP creek above a possible 'narrows' section and continued up the North KP trail back to my vehicle. The burnt ridge was a tad disheartening and difficult to navigate but i kept pushing and enjoyed the great views across the canyon. Steeple creek was rather pleasant but the real treat was hiking along KP creek with all its many mini-falls, berries, flowers, mushrooms, and massive trees. This place is definitely worth another visit just for this creek section. :bigth:
_____________________
Yea, canyoneering is an extreme sport... EXTREMELY dramatic!!! =p
1 archive
Jun 21 2008
Tim
avatar

 Guides 10
 Triplogs 430

59 male
 Joined Feb 25 2002
 Scottsdale
North Fork KP Trail #93Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 21 2008
Tim
Hiking5.60 Miles 1,500 AEG
Hiking5.60 Miles   3 Hrs   15 Mns   1.72 mph
1,500 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
In order to beat the heat, my buddy Jim and I took his son Alex and one of Alex's friends, Karl, up to the Alpine area for a weekend of camping and hiking. On Saturday morning, we headed down the North Fork of KP Trail, (trail #93), with the idea of coming out via the South Fork of KP Trail, (trail #70). This would be a one way hike that would require some hitch hiking at the end if we wanted to avoid hiking the roads for 4.6 miles.

We pushed off at 9:40 with the temperatures in the upper 60's. (It was 115 in the Valley that day.) Having spoken to Forest Service previously, we were expecting to encounter some tree down fall as budget cuts had eliminated the trail maintenance crews this year. Apparently it was an especially harsh winter this past year which magnified the problem. On the hike in, we came across quite a few downed trees that we had to negotiate but they were no big deal as the trail was always clearly visible. (It's a drainage, where else are you going to go?) We covered the 2.6 miles to the intersection with the South Fork Trail in about 1 ¼ hours. We hiked down a little further past the intersection so as to obtain a view of the 10 foot water fall and stopped briefly for a snack before heading up the South Fork drainage 3 miles to our trailhead exit.

This is where it got interesting. Whereas earlier the downed trees were individuals or in pairs, whole stands of trees were down across the trail here. This area was burned by the KP Fire several years back and a lot of the trees were dead and just waiting for a heavy snow or strong wind to knock them over and that must have been what happened this past winter. There was one stretch where we were climbing over and under trees for 30 yards in search of the trail. Granted, it is a drainage and the trail heads up, but it was easy to lose the trail on either side of the creek with all of the down fall. That first ¾ mile stretch at the bottom took us darn near an hour to climb through, around, and over. We were getting tree sap all over us and my pack kept getting hung up. (I can't imagine doing this with an overnight pack.) And every once in a while I was stabbed by broken branches as we pushed through this heinous mess. A campground host later told us that earlier in the week, some groups on horseback had been forced to turn back it was so thick. It was rather entertaining however. About half way up the drainage the down fall let up and we were able to cover the 3 miles in about 2 hours.

Towards the end, storms had started to roll in. The temperature ended up dropping to a wonderful 51 degrees. We got to the trailhead and there was nobody around to bum a ride off of so we started walking the 1.3 miles up the dirt road to the highway. (From the highway it was another 3.3 miles back to the trail head at #93.) Just before we got to the highway, we caught a ride from the campground host who graciously gave us a lift back to our vehicle. All told the trail hike covered 5.6 miles in 3 ¼ hours. The climb out was only supposed to be 1,200 vertical feet but with all of the zig zagging and climbing around downed trees the actual AEG came in at closer to 1,500 feet.

Given the lack of trail maintenance this year, one should probably plan on a good deal of additional time, especially when making the larger loops down towards the Blue River.
_____________________
Jun 01 2007
Grasshopper
avatar

 Guides 45
 Routes 472
 Photos 8,622
 Triplogs 534

75 male
 Joined Dec 28 2006
 Scottsdale, AZ
North Fork KP Trail #93Alpine, AZ
Alpine, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 01 2007
Grasshopper
Hiking5.00 Miles 1,600 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   2 Hrs   50 Mns   1.76 mph
1,600 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
After 2 days in camp at Hannagan Meadow Campground, now having reviewed maps and scouted around the area the day before to find my way to local TH's and trail starts, it was time to go hiking! It was already 11am when I decided to check-out this local North Fork KP Trail#93 which was only a couple of miles South from my campsite, off Hwy#191.

This short 2.4ml "one way" (-1600') trail serves as a connector trail to the more popular KP Trail#70 , connecting at the bottom of KP Canyon. Both these trails leads to one of the more scenic areas in the Blue Primitive Area, the confluence of the North and South Forks of KP Creek where a nice lunch spot resides to enjoy the views while relaxing by two ~10ft waterfalls. This trail#93 exhibits a good example of active vegetation restoration after previous fire(s) pretty much devistated this area. There are some down & burnt trees on the trail that one must cross over, under, and around, but seeing the lush-green regrowth of this forest area is worth it!
_____________________
(Outside.. "there is No Place Like It!!")
average hiking speed 1.76 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

help comment issue

end of page marker