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Yaqui Ridge Trail - 14 members in 31 triplogs have rated this an average 3.3 ( 1 to 5 best )
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31 triplogs
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May 01 2022
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 Guides 70
 Routes 651
 Photos 10,844
 Triplogs 710

male
 Joined Jan 07 2017
 Fountain Hills,
Montezuma - Miller - Border, AZ 
Montezuma - Miller - Border, AZ
 
Hiking avatar May 01 2022
DixieFlyerTriplogs 710
Hiking14.38 Miles 3,988 AEG
Hiking14.38 Miles   7 Hrs   7 Mns   2.46 mph
3,988 ft AEG   1 Hour   16 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Route Scout Route Recorded  on Route Scout Popup | MapDEX
I had hiked up to Miller Peak a couple of times previously, but both times I came in from the north via Miller Canyon. I also wanted to check out the southern terminus of the AZT, so decided to do this hike by starting at Montezuma Pass.

My original plan was to hike down to the border, then hike to Miller Peak, and then come back to Montezuma Pass. However, the temperatures were a bit warmer than I would have preferred, so I decided to hike to Miller Peak first in order to get most of the elevation gain done early in the morning. Of course, that meant that we'd finish the hike by going uphill for the last 2 miles, but I figured that was the lesser of 2 evils.

The Crest Trail from Montezuma Pass to Miller Peak had some obvious recent trail maintenance, which helped make for an enjoyable hike on this stretch. It was a bit breezy at the summit, but it wasn't too bad. It was a hazy days, so views weren't as nice as I have seen them before.

Once back at Montezuma Pass, we took a snack break, and then headed south to the border. The border wall was interesting, and we hung out there for a bit before heading back to the TH.

This was an enjoyable hike -- views were great along the way and the trails were in really good condition.
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Mine Shaft
_____________________
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view. -- Edward Abbey
1 archive
Apr 19 2022
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 Guides 187
 Routes 829
 Photos 9,801
 Triplogs 662

69 male
 Joined Jun 27 2015
 Tucson, Arizona
Montezuma Pass to border, AZ 
Montezuma Pass to border, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Apr 19 2022
markthurman53Triplogs 662
Hiking3.85 Miles 858 AEG
Hiking3.85 Miles   2 Hrs   12 Mns   1.79 mph
858 ft AEG      3 Mns Break
 
Partners partners
mamakatt22
Our last hike of day 2 was at Montezuma Pass on the Joes Canyon Trail and Yaqui Trail to the Arizona Trail start point on the border. This is a 4 mile in and back hike with about 800 feet of elevation gain. Things have changed quite a bit along the border since I was last here in 2013. The monument marking the border is still there and the barbed wire fence is repaired and a section of the 30 foot wall is in place.

This is a pleasant hike to do when you just have a little time, great views to the south into Mexico along the upper reaches of the San Pedro River. The weather was in the 80’s by noon but with a thin cloud layer and a strong breeze along the high points of the trail it was pleasant hiking. No one was on the trail and only one other car at the trail head. We will take the scenic route back to Tucson along the west side of the Huachuca Mountains. Dirt road for about 17 miles but in good condition. Stopped by Parker Lake just to se it, very few people there also.
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Mar 19 2022
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 Guides 18
 Routes 71
 Photos 466
 Triplogs 50

65 male
 Joined Dec 26 2018
 Phoenix, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Backpack avatar Mar 19 2022
GrangerGuyTriplogs 50
Backpack24.40 Miles 4,301 AEG
Backpack24.40 Miles1 Day   6 Hrs   3 Mns   
4,301 ft AEG22 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
On the weekend of March 19-20, I hiked Passage 1 of the AZT, from Montezuma Pass south to the border, then north to Parker Canyon Lake. My lovely wife and her friend dropped me off at the pass, and they were still there when I returned a couple of hours later. They had walked up Coronado peak, and when they got back, the parking lot was closed off to clear a space for a helicopter to land as part of a rescue operation.

I continued on north, climbing to the summit of Miller Peak, and then hiking on just a little beyond Bathtub Spring to camp just before dark. I camped in the lee of the ridge, but the wind was really noisy, and coupled with the high elevation, I did not sleep well.

Sunday morning, I got up at dawn and discovered how difficult it is to light an alcohol stove at 38 degrees. Got it going, got my breakfast, and continued on to the lake.

Overall, the trail is in great shape. Just a few trees down in Sunnyside Canyon and just above. Access to both trailheads is easy by car. There were some tiny snow patches in the shady north facing slopes near Miller Peak, but nothing even remotely difficult. There might be a little more now. The weather came in just as I got to Parker Canyon Lake, and left at least a dusting of snow at higher elevations.

Compared to all the Sonoran desert I have been haunting lately, this area was a pleasure to visit. Lots of oaks, Douglas Fir, Ponderosa Pine, and Junipers made for a nice forest at the higher elevation. On the other hand, going uphill above 7000’ is always a challenge for this old guy.

We did pretty well hitting our rendezvous time at the marina. I was 10 minutes early and my wife was 25 minutes early.
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] HAZ - Selfie
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Miller Peak
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
Dec 11 2019
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 Guides 43
 Routes 151
 Photos 22,497
 Triplogs 2,284

72 male
 Joined May 04 2004
 Mesa, AZ
Montezuma Pass to US/Mexico Border, AZ 
Montezuma Pass to US/Mexico Border, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Dec 11 2019
CannondaleKidTriplogs 2,284
Hiking3.90 Miles 978 AEG
Hiking3.90 Miles   1 Hour   53 Mns   2.07 mph
978 ft AEG20 LBS Pack
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners partners
trixiec
After cutting our Brown Canyon hike short, a quick drive to Montezuma Pass and a quick hike to the border we were able to make it back an hour before sunset.
Another hike with nothing special, but at least it checked another AZT box for Tracey.
_____________________
CannondaleKid
1 archive
Oct 28 2019
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 Guides 8
 Routes 12
 Photos 1,317
 Triplogs 491

57 male
 Joined Nov 15 2005
 Jackson, CA
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 28 2019
toddakTriplogs 491
Hiking21.00 Miles 5,000 AEG
Hiking21.00 Miles   9 Hrs   30 Mns   2.21 mph
5,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Day 3 of 3 and the AZT is in the books! SOBO up the monster climb in gorgeous Scotia and Sunnyside Canyons and along the crest, then my gracious wife / shuttle driver met me at Montezuma Pass and we did the final leg down to the border together.

All told I spent about 50 days hiking the AZT, mostly since 2017 when I started getting increasingly focused (obsessed?) with completing the whole thing. Mostly I did long day hikes, with 2 day/1 night backpacks for Passages 16/17, 18/19 and 35/36. Section hiking had the advantage of mixing up the hiking direction as well as the seasons. I was able to loop hike or bike shuttle about half the passages, car shuttle for the rest.

It's hard to describe the appeal of the AZT. No doubt there are long stretches that will never be featured in Arizona Highways, but every passage held beauty, interest, diversity and great appreciation for the vision and effort that went into building it. Definitely a case of the whole being much greater than just the sum of it's parts. AmaZingTrail.

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Bathtub (Tub) Spring Dripping Dripping
full and clear
_____________________
Mar 16 2019
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 Routes 104
 Photos 1
 Triplogs 79

41 female
 Joined Oct 21 2016
 Tempe, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 16 2019
MAPTriplogs 79
Hiking20.60 Miles 5,090 AEG
Hiking20.60 Miles   14 Hrs   58 Mns   1.57 mph
5,090 ft AEG   1 Hour   50 Mns Break24 LBS Pack
 
no photosets
1st trip
March 15, 2019: Drove from Phoenix to Parker Canyon Lake area. Tried to leave one vehicle at trailhead but road was too muddy. Left car at nearby cabin (checked with owner) instead, packed everyone into second vehicle and drove to Montezuma Pass Overlook Parking (Lat:31.350783 Lon:-110.285413). Started hike south to border monument around 11:30 am. Hiked to Mexico border, took some pictures, goofed around, and hiked back. Total distance: 3.7 miles r/t and total time 1 hr 48 min (including goofing around time). Montezuma Pass Overlook is apparently always windy and this portion of the hike was very windy as well. If leaving a vehicle at Montezuma Pass overnight, make sure to stop at the Visitor Center about 3.5 miles down Montezuma Pass Road (headed towards Miracle Valley/Palomitas) to get a vehicle permit (basically just give them vehicle info).

After the border portion of the hike we drove to Bisbee, explored a few of the stairwells, walked around town, ate at POCO (delicious!), hiked up to The Shrine, and returned to our Airbnb (Rose's Place on Brewery).

March 16, 2019: Left Bisbee around 6:30 am and drove to Montezuma Pass Overlook. Started hike at about 7:30 am with wild whipping winds & very cold temps (temp was around 38-40 deg but wind chill made it much colder). Luckily the wind died down quickly as we headed North and up the mountain. Pretty steady incline immediately and for the next few miles until Miller Peak TH intersection. Took a few short breaks and one probably 15 min break just before the snow got serious on the trail. Snow started about 0.3 mile before Miller TH. Was icy & slick in some places, easy in others. We made the extra 0.5 mile hike up to Miller Peak & it was so worth it! Incredible views above the clouds. We met a couple guys day-hiking to Miller and a group of maybe 6 people through hiking the AZT.

After Miller we hiked through snow for about 7 miles with deepest snow between Miller and Carr. We ran into border patrol agents hiking in four groups of two between Miller and Carr. They were nice and friendly and happy to be out hiking. We took another 15-20 minute break and refilled water at Bathtub Spring, just before the Carr Peak TH. Took another long break at Bear Creek TH...snow hiking was wearing on us. Just before Rattlesnake Spring there is a steep decent of switchbacks, marking the end of the "up" portion of Passage 1. Snow ends around Rattlesnake Spring. Rattlesnake Spring had nice flat campsite areas and we stopped there for the night. Another group (2 women, 1 guy) came in after we were bundled in tents and camped just up from us. The night was cold (low temps were supposed to be around 38 deg but it felt colder) but we did just fine with the gear we had. Day 2 distance: around 9.2 miles, total time: 9 hr 45 min (including breaks), max elevation: 9443 ft.

March 17, 2019: Woke up, quickly packed and started moving to warm up. Ran into another woman hiking in - being a group of 4 women ourselves, it was awesome to see so many other women on the trail!). The trail is all downhill from here and is quite different from the trail we had hiked the previous day. Plentiful water from just past Rattlesnake Spring to Scotia Canyon parking area near the end of Passage 1. Sunnyside Canyon Trail is absolutely beautiful with flowing streams & swimming holes (if the temps were warmer) throughout. Ended Day 3 at exactly 7 miles, 3 hr 13 min time (including breaks).

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Bathtub (Tub) Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Bathtub full and spring water seeping from ground

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Sunnyside Canyon @ AZT Heavy flow Heavy flow
Flowing streams from Sunnyside Canyon to Scotia Canyon parking area
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2 archives
Jan 20 2019
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 Guides 20
 Routes 5
 Photos 3,127
 Triplogs 442

female
 Joined Mar 31 2002
 Chandler, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 20 2019
desertgirlTriplogs 442
Hiking3.82 Miles 995 AEG
Hiking3.82 Miles   2 Hrs   46 Mns   1.89 mph
995 ft AEG      45 Mns Break
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners partners
Paintninaz
Sredfield
tibber
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Jan 20 2019
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 Guides 21
 Routes 605
 Photos 31,554
 Triplogs 1,276

66 female
 Joined Feb 26 2004
 Phoenix, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 20 2019
tibberTriplogs 1,276
Hiking3.82 Miles 995 AEG
Hiking3.82 Miles   2 Hrs   46 Mns   1.89 mph
995 ft AEG      45 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Partners partners
desertgirl
Paintninaz
Sredfield
Day Two of our southern Arizona adventure. After a good breakfast in Patagonia it was time to head out for our Passage 1 "ends to make the middle a little less long" trek. We dropped a vehicle at the TH at Parker Canyon Lake and then headed to Montezuma Pass. Both drives ended up being about 15 minutes less than anticipated. The Montezuma Canyon Road is in pretty good shape.

We geared up for what was to be a quick jaunt to the border and back. Well it might be quick if you're JJ or several other HAZers out there but not if you're an out of shape Arizona Trail Section Crew member :lol: . It's a nice part of the passage heading around Coronado Peak to a Saddle and some sweeping switchbacks down and down and then south to the border. We encountered only two other people on our way down. The temps were nice especially when a breeze would blow in. The views are fabulous almost everywhere you look. As I was going up I could see where the trail goes up the mountain until I couldn't tell anymore. All I know is it goes way up.

We played on the border and observed our surroundings for several minutes before the climb back up. The trail has just a few slippery parts but on the way up, you don't really notice. I ventured ahead until the saddle as I was feeling my oats as they say. There is a bench at the saddle so you can sit and enjoy your surroundings. A lot more people were on the trail now. We headed back to the Pass via a section that had lots of cholla with yellow fruit so we had to take several photos of course. Once at the Pass we grabbed our coolers and had lunch before our drive to the trail next to Sunnyside.

The hike: [ youtube video ]
The drive from the Pass to Sunnyside: [ youtube video ]
_____________________
For me, sometimes it's just as much about the journey as the destination.
Oh, and once in awhile, don't forget to look back at the trail you've traveled.
Nov 04 2018
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 Guides 7
 Routes 160
 Photos 701
 Triplogs 199

39 male
 Joined Nov 30 2015
 Phoenix, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Run/Jog avatar Nov 04 2018
ShatteredArmTriplogs 199
Run/Jog23.77 Miles 4,816 AEG
Run/Jog23.77 Miles   7 Hrs   18 Mns   3.31 mph
4,816 ft AEG      7 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Another one from the "retro" category... I'm a little undecided about how far back I want to log these adventures, but I do kind of want to make sure I document my quest to run the AZT. My trip down to the Huachucas didn't start with this goal in mind. I really just wanted to get down there and explore the area, maybe hit Miller Peak, Ramsey Canyon, whatever seemed worthwhile, but didn't have any intel on the area. A friend in Tucson made a suggestion, why not just do the first segment of the AZT?

Since he was willing to join, and help shuttle, I went with his idea.

From Coronado National Monument, we ran down to the border (the nice thing about the out-and-back nature of this section is we didn't have to carry water because we would be back at the car in a few miles). I had always wanted to see the border monument. I knew about the...openness...of the border here. Stepping through the wire fence to cross back and forth from Mexico is a lot more fun than it should be. Before anybody complains about the lack of border security here, the ranger we were talking to on the way back assured us that nobody crosses here due to the fact that there is surveillance everywhere.

Back at the vehicle, we picked up our packs, started heading up the long, gradual climb into the high country. The views from the ridge are amazing.

Of course we did the little quarter-mile-or-so spur to the windy Miller Peak summit. Enjoyed an even more spectacular view, had a snack, and continued on. The next several miles were just up and down, crossing over the crest a couple of times.

The beginning of the descent down into Sunnyside Canyon was very welcome, and really a lot of fun. It's quite a nice little canyon (unfortunately the trail doesn't go through the old Sunnyside townsite, which I didn't learn existed until later - it has a fascinating history).

Not gonna lie, the last 4-5 miles into Parker Canyon Lake never seemed to end, but overall, it was a really good time, and it wasn't until after I was done that I decided I would try to run all the AZT Passages.
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Apr 02 2016
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 Routes 4
 Photos 159
 Triplogs 23

43 male
 Joined Apr 03 2016
 Phoenix, AZ
Joe's Canyon / Yaqui Ridge / Coronado Peak, AZ 
Joe's Canyon / Yaqui Ridge / Coronado Peak, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Apr 02 2016
DevilChildTriplogs 23
Hiking9.02 Miles 2,683 AEG
Hiking9.02 Miles   6 Hrs   12 Mns   1.71 mph
2,683 ft AEG      56 Mns Break15 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
This was an old hike but a memorable one so I figured it was time to post the route and triplog for it. I became intrigued with the National Park System's I Hike For Health Challenge and set out that day for a hardcore (for me) day trip. Leaving phoenix about 3:45 AM I arrived to Coronado National Memorial visitor's station about 8am to start my planned hike.

The plan: Start on Joe's Canyon trail head; hike to Yaqui Ridge junction then do an out and back on Yaqui Ridge; return to junction then hike up the steep side of Coronado Peak to the viewing station; hike down Coronado Peak to Montezuma Pass then return to the starting point back at the Joe's Canyon trail head. Oh and of course swing by the visitor station to retrieve my I Hike For Health pin.

I found the hike up Joe's Canyon very enjoyable with nice switchbacks and plenty of shade at the start that transitions to more switchbacks and less tree cover. Great views back towards the visitor's station and Montezuma Peak. Exiting the canyon places you on a generally level hike along the ridge towards the Yaqui junction.

Yaqui was a short out and back but worth it to see the start of the Arizona Trail and stand at the border. Total silence and absolute solitude at this point. Just me and relentless wind. The hike back up got my legs burning and my breath huffing while taking in wonderful borderland views.

Hiking up the South side of Coronado peak seemed questionable after start, the trail which seemed clear at the start quickly proved to be more of a trace through the grass and loose gravel. Worth it for the surprised looks on the faces of visitors at the viewing station to see me stumble up out of nowhere.

The hike down Coronado to Montezuma's Pass was very straightforward, made a quick stop to the registry and observed the highly militarized border patrol and forest service presence. Something only found in the Southern reaches of the state. Return to the visitor station to high five the ranger, get my pin, and grab some awesome books from the bookstore to start my long drive back to Phoenix with a giant smile on my face.
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2 archives
Dec 20 2015
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 Guides 2
 Routes 4
 Photos 3,873
 Triplogs 362

48 female
 Joined Feb 12 2008
 Tucson, AZ
AZT Yo-yo Finish, AZ 
AZT Yo-yo Finish, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Dec 20 2015
sirenaTriplogs 362
Hiking3.80 Miles 900 AEG
Hiking3.80 Miles
900 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Recently I got to be a small part of a friend’s inspiring journey and I wanted to share an article I wrote:

Traversing the Arizona Trail- Twice!

Coronado National Memorial, Arizona
: On December 20th, Kathy and Ras Vaughan of Whidbey Island, Washington became the first people to yo-yo the 800-mile Arizona National Scenic Trail. For 93 days, this adventurous couple—known by their collective trail name as UltraPedestrian—traversed the state of Arizona twice. Starting at the US/Mexico border on September 18th and hiking to the Utah border, then immediately turning around and heading back to Mexico, the couple covered a total of 1,668 miles. They endured everything from 100-degree temperatures to several snowstorms during an unseasonably wet year.

“We wanted to experience the trail as completely as possible, seeing it in both directions and taking on a challenge that no one else has ever experienced before,” said Ras. The Vaughans thru-hiked the Arizona Trail in spring of 2014, with Kathy establishing the fastest known time for a female in 35 days. Not only is a yo-yo twice as long as a regular thru-hike of the trail, but extreme weather is more likely. They completed the trail self-supported and hiked in and out of the gateway communities, adding 68 miles to their journey to resupply rather than accepting rides.

“Meeting people along the trail and in the gateway communities helped us understand the connection between the people and the places of Arizona,” said Kathy. “The challenge of the trail helped us improvise solutions to the problems that came up, whether it was dealing with gear issues or weather conditions.”

They had a SPOT tracker so that folks could follow along and shared frequent updates from the trail on Instagram and Facebook.

I had met them briefly last year on the trail and had a bit of fun doing some trail angeling during the yo-yo, showing up in the middle of nowhere with treats and beverages and words of encouragement. I offered to pick them up at the Mexican border at the end of their journey and they let me tag along for the last two miles.

Congrats to this incredible couple! They will be coming back to Arizona in February for a speaking tour and are writing a book, I look forward to both.

About UltraPedestrian

UltraPedestrian is Kathy and Ras Vaughan, who strive to take on unique challenges and inspire others to “find their own version of epic.” Kathy holds the women’s fastest known time for the Arizona Trail and Ras is credited with innovating Only Known Times, including a sextuple Grand Canyon crossing and a unsupported (no resupply) Washington Traverse on the Pacific Crest Trail. Their website is Ultrapedestrian.blo ... .com and they are on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube at @ultrapedestrian.
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Throwing a Wendy
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Sep 05 2015
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 Guides 84
 Routes 700
 Photos 17,531
 Triplogs 1,704

49 male
 Joined Sep 18 2002
 Tempe, AZ
Montezuma Pass to Mexico, AZ 
Montezuma Pass to Mexico, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Sep 05 2015
chumleyTriplogs 1,704
Hiking4.02 Miles 1,033 AEG
Hiking4.02 Miles   1 Hour   35 Mns   2.87 mph
1,033 ft AEG      11 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Partners partners
JuanJaimeiii
Decided to add to my mileage on the day and visit another country. Easy trip down the hill. Didn't see anybody else, resident or alien, until JJ showed up just after I had begun to head back to the truck.

I spooked a deer who got stymied by the fence and then decided to charge straight at me down the trail. It took a second before I realized it was a deer and not something else, and I yelled "hey!" quite loudly! :o We were both startled, and it decided that charging me wasn't the best plan and hopped off into the long grass. A neat close-up experience. :)

On the way back up, JJ decided to hit the south side of Montezuma Peak, while I took Joe's around the east. Boy am I glad I did that! I saw an enormous bird in a dead tree, and despite being aware of my presence it seemed content to stay there. As I got to within 15 feet of it, it decided to fly off, but I was filming! I assumed it was some kind of eagle but I don't know my birds so I asked Outdoor Lover, and she opined that it is probably a juvenile bald eagle! I had no idea they didn't get their white markings until they get older!

I'd hesitate calling this guy juvenile anything! (I'd like to see that egg!) It stood over 2 feet tall when perched in the tree and had a wingspan greater than mine! Easily 5-6 feet! Just an awesome experience to see at such a close range! :y:

Video here: https://youtu.be/bM ... 4Lhg
Make sure to change settings to HD 1080p if it's not there to begin with and view full screen for the best effect.
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two scoops!
1 archive
Sep 05 2015
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 Routes 577
 Photos 8,600
 Triplogs 1,941

55 male
 Joined Jan 30 2011
 Chandler, AZ
Crest Trail Lasso, AZ 
Crest Trail Lasso, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Sep 05 2015
JuanJaimeiiiTriplogs 1,941
Hiking23.87 Miles 7,316 AEG
Hiking23.87 Miles   8 Hrs   17 Mns   2.98 mph
7,316 ft AEG      17 Mns Break
 
1st trip
RW Storm planted the seed to do the Pat-Scott section of the Huachuca's and I enjoyed my visit so much the other day that I decided to head back down to Sierra Vista. Chumley had already made plans to be down there for the weekend so we worked it out to start this one together.

We headed up the Crest Trail shortly after 7am and were in a hazy drizzle. I was questioning how this day would unfold in my head as we made out way up into the dark clouds. Chums plan was to hit Miller Peak and then possibly go down to the border on the AZT. My plan was to take the Crest trail all the way to the Pat-Scott Trail and then lasso back on the Hamburg Trail. Things were going well and we went out separate ways at the Miller Peak junction. Chumley went up and I continued on.

The weather slowly improved and eventually the sun would peek thru. I didn't encounter any troubles the whole day. The Pat-Scott was a treat as promised. Water was flowing heavily with several waterfalls. Flowers and old mining equipment highlighted the journey as I made my way down canyon. Then I turned and headed back up on the Hamburg.

I made good time and upon reaching my vehicle I received a note from Chumley that he had done some extended hiking himself and then went on to the border. I decided to head down myself. After all it's just not right for him to go to Mexico without me! :?

Down at the fence we took a couple photos and then headed back up. On the return I would hit Coronado Peak as Chumley completed the first part of AZT 1 to Montezuma Pass.

Another GREAT day in the Huachuca's!
_____________________
1 archive
Apr 18 2015
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 Routes 67
 Photos 966
 Triplogs 694

48 female
 Joined Jan 05 2012
 Phoenix,AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 18 2015
slowandsteadyTriplogs 694
Hiking23.37 Miles 4,875 AEG
Hiking23.37 Miles   11 Hrs   14 Mns   2.37 mph
4,875 ft AEG   1 Hour   22 Mns Break
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners partners
BiFrost
It was cool to finally see the start of the AZT.

In my mind the Huachuca's were just covered in trash and not safe to be on. I found that not to be the case at all. We didn't pick up any more discarded water bottles than normal, and there is certainly way more trash on AZT sections that follow dirt roads. Once on top and in the Wilderness, we ran into four other hikers doing an out and back to Miller Peak. The Crest Trail was beautiful and was put on the list to get back to for further exploration.

We finally ran into a thru hiker in Sunnyside Canyon. He had his AZT book in the outside pocket of his pack. He had just started that day and was hoping to make Tucson in nine days and then he would figure out his next plan. He said he didn't have a trail name yet, and he didn't offer up a real one.
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Apr 18 2015
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 Guides 4
 Routes 396
 Photos 9,095
 Triplogs 1,070

52 male
 Joined Nov 20 2012
 Phoenix, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 18 2015
BiFrostTriplogs 1,070
Hiking23.37 Miles 4,875 AEG
Hiking23.37 Miles   11 Hrs   14 Mns   2.37 mph
4,875 ft AEG   1 Hour   22 Mns Break
 
1st trip
Partners partners
slowandsteady
All AZT weekend starting with Huachuca Mtns section on Saturday. We drove up Friday night and car camped to get an earlier start. Hiking from Montezuma Pass TH we made the trek down to the border and checked out the obelisk monument on the fence line. After taking some pics we headed back up the hill to Montezuma Pass TH to start the main climb. Sign says 5.3 miles to Miller Peak from Montezuma Pass might be a little shorter but it's all up for sure. 6575 elevation at Montezuma up to 9466 on Miller Peak which is not mandatory for AZT but goes within 1/2 mile of the peak. So we hit the Miller summit and had lunch on top.

Lunch done we headed northbound on the Crest Trail which traverses between Miller and Carr Peaks. Eventually making it over to Bathtub Spring which was full and very clear water. Stopping briefly at the spring we continued on to Carr Peak turnoff and continuation of the Crest Trail. From here the trail drops several hundred feet as it makes it's way over to Bear Saddle. Once past Bear Saddle the trail starts to climb gradually over 2 miles back up to 8500 feet before topping out near Pat Scott Peak turnoff. However, from here it begins the real descent off the crest with an impressive series of switchbacks all the way down into Sunnyside Canyon. Trail follows the canyon for several miles with good water becoming more abundant as we continued down stream. Eventually the trail hops a shallow ridge over into Scotia Canyon which also had decent amounts of intermittent water flow. The trail finally exits Scotia as it crosses Montezuma Canyon Rd and the last 1 mile over to the end of AZT # 1 overlooking Parker Canyon Lake.

Overall the trail was in great shape. The switchbacks going up from Montezuma Pass to Miller Peak turnoff and the switchbacks going down into Sunnyside Canyon were very well constructed. Made the grade and climb seem less steep than it really was. Only section that might need some work is on the Crest Trail between Miller Peak and Carr Peak turnoffs about 2 miles. Thanks to our friend Scott for volunteering to make the shuttle dropping us off at Montezuma Pass with our vehicle at the other end.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Bathtub (Tub) Spring Gallon per minute Gallon per minute
tub almost full with clear water
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2 archives
Oct 14 2014
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 Guides 1
 Routes 1
 Photos 64
 Triplogs 12

41 male
 Joined Sep 30 2014
 Borderlands, AZ
AZT - Passages 1-2-3, AZ 
AZT - Passages 1-2-3, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Oct 14 2014
BenTellyTriplogs 12
Backpack60.00 Miles 9,790 AEG
Backpack60.00 Miles3 Days   3 Hrs      
9,790 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
This was a great solo trek - my first big undertaking of the AZT, completing passages 1, 2, 3 and a bit of 4. Water was plentiful in springs and washes. Leaves were changing, aspens up high and sycamores and cottonwoods at mid-elevations. Temps were nearly perfect. A great time to do these 3 (and a bit more) passages. Water was not an issue - as I mentioned - and good clean water in the springs/washes was easily found on most sections of the trail. Passage 3 - Canelo Hills West - was a bit difficult to navigate due to the flooding this monsoon season. Sections of the trail are just not there anymore and illegal trails can easily be mistaken for AZT right-of-ways. All part of the glorious adventure. Passage 3 is also home to many trailside cat-claw acacia, pants or brush gaters are a must. Read on ---

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Up and over the highest peaks of the Huachucas escorted by the chortles and croaks of my friends, the ravens, following me for miles (four ravens do not a murder make; or do they?). Yellow had set into what is left of the post-fire aspen groves on the slopes between Miller and Carr Peaks. Autumn does exist here in southern Arizona. You just have to find it. The chance sighting of a twin-spotted rattlesnake and a Lewis’s Woodpecker made the afternoon more memorable. They are rare encounters here, the former a resident, the latter a visitor. The trail moves directly onto the crest past Tub Spring (yes, there is actually a bathtub) and Bear Saddle (no bears), dividing the view east and west. Then down, and down some more into Sunnyside Canyon with rusty orange Sycamores lining the wash, still running with water. I camped near the wilderness boundary, a fresh, still warm pile of bear scat nearby (hang the food high!). After a dinner of sardines and pasta, I sipped a bit of whiskey and listened to owls call across the oak groves, pleasantly reminded of why I do this sort of thing.

On the trail the next morning I encountered the first of two border patrol agents I would come across during the journey and consequently the only two people I would see in three days. I wondered if I had tripped a sensor since he seemed to be waiting for me where the trail crossed a two-track road. “I’m coming from Mexico”, seemed like a fitting yet possibly misinterpreted remark. He failed to see the humor but wished me well, his diesel engine roaring off into the foothills. The trail follows shady Scotia Canyon, crisscrossing the flowing wash, and then intersects with FR 48 (BP encounter #2) near Parker Canyon Lake and the beginning of AZT passage 2: Canelo Hills East (Güero Canelo de Este).

The trail literature mentions that in the future the AZT will actually pass near Parker Canyon Lake, but the current trail passes well south of the shore. A spur trail heads north to the lake but I continued on into the Cinnamon Hills, eager to explore an unfamiliar area. Resting near a big pool of clear water in Parker Canyon I studied the map. The elevation profile of the Canelos looks like an EKG. Up and down, up and down, for 17 miles. The trail is in great condition here with no real issues with navigation. I opted for the ol' map and compass over a GPS. Partially because I enjoy orienteering (which is not really necessary along this passage but.. still) and partially because I don't own a GPS. I pushed through this section of trail but enjoyed the landscape and scenery and spent the night in the Canelos, about a mile from the beginning of passage 3, up on the ridge overlooking the Huachucas and San Rafael Valley. Coyotes were active and they came a little too close for comfort that evening, no doubt interested in my food hanging high - or as high as possible - in a nearby juniper. Short stories by Ed Abbey kept me company that evening, refueling my mind for the next day.

Passage 3 started the next morning pre-dawn as I made my way down the ridge and across Canelo Pass road. West of Canelo Pass I took my pack off and meandered along the saddle before descending into Meadow Valley. I'd seen lithic scatters along other saddles similar to these and I was sure I'd find some cultural evidence here at this point between two viewsheds. On to Meadow Valley's amber waves of ... grasslands. The trail was well marked through this area as singletrack merges with old two-tracks and back to singletracks, along a finger ridge and down into the head of Red Rock Canyon toward Down Under Tank (which was full to overflowing). The section past the exclosure area begins to get tricky as flooding has erased trail signs through the wash on the way to Red Rock Ranch. It's fairly easy to see where one needs to go however and other than a few moments of wandering I was able to find my way to the ranch and the windmill. It was near this point that a Sonoran Coralsnake crossed the trail in front of me -- a rare treat indeed. Beautiful.

With some difficulty (re: navigation) I was able to find the trail that eventually leaves the wash of Red Rock Canyon and heads south toward the saddle and Harshaw Rd trailhead. Grateful to find the road into Patagonia I trudged the 2 miles into town, finding cold beer and good food at Velvet Elvis and a comfortable bed at Stage Stop Inn. The next morning, after coffee and a good breakfast in town I headed north on 1st Ave in Patagonia and along Temporal Rd, 7 miles to where my supportive, wonderful girlfriend picked me up at Temporal Gulch.

BT
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Moderate
Aspen near peak at high elevation (8,500ft) between Miller and Carr Peaks in the 'Chooks. Sycamore starting to change in the mid-elevation spots along riparian corridors: Sunnyside Canyon, Scotia Canyon, Parker Canyon, Red Rock Canyon. Cottonwoods just starting to turn in above mentioned mid to mid-low elevation (4,000 - 5,000) canyons.
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1 archive
May 04 2014
avatar

 Guides 2
 Routes 189
 Photos 4,214
 Triplogs 2,617

60 male
 Joined Feb 26 2008
 Scottsdale, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar May 04 2014
BobPTriplogs 2,617
Hiking23.30 Miles 5,200 AEG
Hiking23.30 Miles
5,200 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
I was really looking forward to this section. Richard and I setup the shuttle the previous day. Dave met us in Sierra Vista and we drove to the pass. Dave and I headed south and Richard headed north. We went to the border and Dave made a dash south. He gathered his wits and we headed back. Richard was at the pass and feeling sick :( . Dave and I headed up the crest trail and the higher we got the sicker Dave felt. The area is wicked cool and I would like to hit the peaks in the fall. A couple cool things happened today. We were checking out a few deer and I was doing a kissing sound when all of a sudden it came towards us and grunted. A few seconds later, a bobcat came out of hiding and took off. We had ruined his lunch for the time being. Later on, I did some turkey calls but every time the gobbler gobbled Dave didn't have the video on. And when he did have the video on, you can only hear me gobble. :) It was a long day and finally when I saw the truck, I began to jog because unlike Miller time near the peak...it was now Sierra Nevada time. Fun day but I wished it was a little cooler and less sunny. Also, I wished the others felt better.
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Miller Peak
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https://www.seeitourway.org
Always pronounce Egeszsegedre properly......
If you like this triplog you must be a friend of BrunoP
May 04 2014
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 Routes 29
 Photos 1,548
 Triplogs 1,802

46 male
 Joined Jan 25 2009
 Phoenix, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar May 04 2014
Dave1Triplogs 1,802
Hiking22.50 Miles 5,090 AEG
Hiking22.50 Miles
5,090 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners partners
BobP
mazatzal
Met up with Richard and Bob at the No-tell Motel in sprawling Sierra Vista (home of the first McDonalds drive-thru. The drive-thru was created to serve Fort Huachuca soldiers who weren't
permitted to get out of their cars while wearing fatigues) Sunday morning (I was a little late :oops: sorry). They had already cached a vehicle near Parker Lake the night before (thanks, guys!) so we went directly to the Montezuma Pass Trailhead. Bob and I did the first section to Mexico and back while Richard got an early start on the Crest trail. We met back up again and, with a few revisions to our plan, Bob and I set off up Crest and Richard went on to switch the shuttle vehicles and hit the last 4 miles of #1. The Crest Trail just climbs and climbs! Felt like I was hiking out of GC!

As we were ascending Crest Trail, the elevation started to affect me. I did all I could to keep up with Bob, begging him for breaks as much as possible. We decided to skip Miller Peak which I now regret. Once the trail leveled off more or less, we enjoyed hiking through some nice tree cover with a few peeks of Parker Lake and Sierra Vista way down below. At one point we came upon two deer just off trail. One took off but the other stuck around and allowed us a few pictures. Then he suddenly darted towards us and then took off down the slope! We looked to the opposite side of the trail and just caught the tail end of a bobcat scurrying off! Not sure how long the bobcat was there but I think we ruined its lunch! We kept our eyes open for cats after that but all we came up with was a big turkey, whom Bob seemed to communicate with quite well. Bob would let out a turkey call and the bird replied several times. Funniest thing all day!

The last part of the trail kind of dragged on a bit as it follows an old mining road and then, as you exit the wilderness, becomes a usable road. Great hike overall though! Thanks for setting this up, Bob! And the Gatorade! And thanks for driving and setting up the shuttle, Richard!
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May 04 2014
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 Routes 34
 Photos 2,520
 Triplogs 1,208

65 male
 Joined Jul 28 2004
 Scottsdale, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar May 04 2014
mazatzalTriplogs 1,208
Hiking10.00 Miles 1,600 AEG
Hiking10.00 Miles   3 Hrs   40 Mns   2.93 mph
1,600 ft AEG      15 Mns Break
 no routes
I'd come up with a plan to shorten the 23 miles / 5000' elevation gain: skip the 3.5 miles to/from the border and finish near Sunnyside (ghost town of 3 buildings) about 4 miles from the end. This would put it nearer 15-16 miles with about 4000' aeg (much better for me) and I knew easy to come back and fill the two gaps.

I set off up the Crest trail while Dave and Bob went to the border. This would let me get a head start on the speedsters. After about a mile I realized this wasn't going to happen today due to lack of energy and nausea. So I went back to the TH and waited for Dave and Bob and told them I'd do the border trip and then I'd put Bob's vehicle at the end and hike the 4 miles to mine. After I got to my truck I left them a water cache near Sunnyside and took off.

Not a great day but I've got the first 6.5 miles and the last 4 of #1 but unfortunately I'm missing the middle 11.5 [-( New plans in the works for those miles using Miller/Carr canyons and an out and back from Sunnyside :) Saw 5 deer (3+1+1) in Scotia Canyon.
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2 archives
Mar 14 2014
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 Guides 2
 Routes 4
 Photos 3,873
 Triplogs 362

48 female
 Joined Feb 12 2008
 Tucson, AZ
Huachuca Mountains - AZT #1Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Backpack avatar Mar 14 2014
sirenaTriplogs 362
Backpack54.00 Miles 9,170 AEG
Backpack54.00 Miles5 Days         
9,170 ft AEG
 no routes
Arizona Trail Trek- Mexico to Patagonia

What a start to the Arizona Trail Trek! On March 14th at noon, 28 people gathered at Montezuma Pass in the Coronado National Memorial to hike with me to the Mexican border and back. You see, there’s no driving to the start of the Arizona Trail, to get to it you have to hike almost two miles down to Monument 102 that marks the border and the southern terminus of the AZT.

We had a wonderful hike to the border, took the requisite starting out pictures, and then I read Dale Shewalter’s poem The Arizona Trail. The views from the hike and border are spectacular looking into Mexico.

After hiking back up to our cars, we went into Sierra Vista for the first of the Gateway Community Events at the beautiful Garden Place Suites. We enjoyed blues by C.J. Fletcher, tasty appetizers from the Sierra Vista Food Co-op, and Arizona Trail Ale from That Brewery in Pine, AZ. It was great to see folks from all over the state coming together to talk trail and make new contacts for future adventures on the AZT.

The next morning, nine of us and a mini-donkey met at Montezuma Pass once again- this time for a 15 mile dayhike up and over the Huachuca Mountains. The mini-donkey’s name is Jasmine and her person that she hikes with is Leigh Anne. They were both a blast to have along, as was the rest of the group. We had a tough but rewarding day, starting out with a climb up to 9000 feet on the Huachuca Crest. The trail rolls along the crest, stopping at one of my favorite water sources, Bathtub Spring. Here we met up with BASA, Birdnut, and Norm, thruhikers that had come to the kickoff party and started the trail that morning.

We had incredible views on the crest before taking the Sunnyside Canyon Trail down the west side of the mountain. The trail finally leveled out to an old road in the canyon and I saw more bear scat than I have ever seen in one place. Pile after pile after pile. They really liked that canyon!

We ended our hike in Scotia Canyon and were met by shuttle driver extraordinaire Bernie with cold drinks, snacks and cookies for the folks going back to Montezuma Pass. My dad, who is out from Chicago to help with my hike, met me and I packed up my backpack for the next three days into Patagonia.

I spent the night in Scotia Canyon with Rick, who was hiking to Patagonia with me, and Levi, who was filming the AZT Trek for our upcoming Indiegogo campaign. We had a wonderful full moon and were treated to a fantastic falling star.

The next morning, I was finally able to relax in camp for a bit and we got a leisurely start of 10:30. We would have left earlier, but there were three cowboys and their dogs making a giant scene trying to rope a cow in the forest. It was one of those wild-west holdovers that make you realize that some people still make a living roping cattle from the back of a horse. After they’d subdued the cow, they came over to say hi. The one asked, “You all hiking the trail?” And I said yes, that I am hiking the entire AZT. He looked at me from his horse and said, “Didn’t I just see you on T.V.?” Recognized by a cowboy in the middle of nowhere!! Cracked me up.

Rick and I finally got on the trail, tailed by Levi, our enthusiastic videographer. We all hiked to the Parker Canyon Lake Trailhead and the end of Passage 1 where we found mountain biker Steve, who had been at the kickoff party. He had put some water out for me at the trailhead that said “Go Sirena!” and we stopped to chat for a while. We were joined by thru hiker Jim with his adorable dog Chance for a lunch break.

After lunch, Rick and I hiked for a while, up and down through the Canelo Hills. We had a great break along the flowing creek in Parker Canyon to filter some water. Nothing like flowing water in the desert. There was a climb to a small ridge with incredible views in every direction and we called it camp. Not too tough of a day, which was nice. There will be plenty of long, tough days ahead.

The full moonrise was spectacular and lit up the sky like it was daytime again. I slept like a rock and was treated to an amazing sunrise from my sleeping bag. I love cowboy camping under the stars- who wants to look at the inside of a tent? Not this girl.

The next day was up and down, up and down through the Cinnamon Hills (Canelo in Spanish). The landscape is one of oak-dotted grassy ridges, every so often giving views of the surrounding Sky Island mountain ranges. We could see the Santa Ritas, Mustang, Rincon, Catalina, and Huachuca ranges from high points of the trail. The Catalinas looked so far- and I’m going to walk there and beyond!

I felt really good, finally settling into the fact that I get to live outside for the next two and a half months. I was giddy with excitement- finally, after 7 years of dreaming of thru hiking the Arizona Trail, here I was! In the intervening years, both the trail and I had changed a bit.

One of the highlights of the Canelo West passage is the hike through Meadow Valley. Rick and I marveled at the wide expanse of golden grasses bathed in afternoon sun.

As it got later, we were looking for a place to camp and chose this nondescript clearing on a grass and catclaw covered hillside. It turned out to be much better than we had expected and we were treated to a colorful sunset followed by yet another picturesque moonrise.

The next morning, we hiked to Red Bank Well and got water from a solar-powered windmill that shot water out of a pipe on a tall green tank. These passages are in open-ranching territory and we passed many bovines, some with impressive horns.

We were dropping elevation and as we got closer to the Harshaw Trailhead the temperatures soared and poppies and other wildflowers began to appear. Springtime is here!

We reached the trailhead, still three miles outside of Patagonia. I was planning on staying with the couple who runs the visitor’s center and owns Patagon bike rental and Maggie was kind enough to meet us and take our packs into town. I stopped to adjust my right shoe after she drove away and the entire tongue of the shoe pulled right out!! Shoes are the most important thing when you’re walking across the state and I immediately started thinking about what I was going to do.

We walked the road and the first thing we saw when we got into town was a poster advertising the Arizona Trail Trek event in Patagonia on the 20th! Exciting that I’ve just walked 52 miles into my first town from Mexico. What a great five days on the trail. We had a paleta (Mexican ice cream bar) from Ovens of Patagonia to celebrate.

Thankfully, I had gotten into Patagonia a day earlier than expected, and Rick was having a friend of his pick him up and bring him back to Tucson, where he’d parked his car. I caught a ride and before I knew it, I was back in Tucson and buying a new pair of shoes. Brian, my husband, was ecstatic to get to spend some bonus time together and I slept in my own bed. Not exactly what I was expecting, but not the worst thing that could happen by far.

Now I’m back in Patagonia and the second Arizona Trail Trek event is happening tonight at Plaza de Patagonia, 277 McKeown Ave from 5-8 pm. Music by Jamnesia, tasty food from Ovens of Patagonia, and Arizona Trail Ale.

To donate to the Arizona Trail Trek’s mission to raise $20,000 for the Arizona Trail Association, visit http://www.aztrail.org/azttrek/donate

The Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign with exclusive incentives kicks off on Friday, March 28th with an event at Sky Bar in Tucson- 536 4th Ave from 7-10 pm. Come out for music by Cobracalia and performances by Midriff Revival, Belly Dance Tucson, Brandye Asya, Dragna, Troupe HipNautic and Black Sun Tribe! I am pretty sure that I am the only thru-hiker that comes off the trail for belly dance performances. That’s just how I roll.

Don’t forget, you can also follow the Arizona Trail Trek on the Arizona Trail Association’s Facebook or on Twitter @AZTRAIL- see you on the AZT! Full list of Gateway Community events and public hikes at http://www.aztrail.org/azttrek
Culture
Culture [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Mascot Windmill
Named place
Named place [ checklist ]
[ checklist ] Meadow Valley
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
Poppies and other wildflowers in Canelo West
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average hiking speed 2.24 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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