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Betatakin - 7 members in 9 triplogs have rated this an average 3.9 ( 1 to 5 best )
9 triplogs
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9 Triplogs
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Jun 16 2013
Lucyan
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 Routes 1
 Photos 17,719
 Triplogs 907

40 female
 Joined Jan 18 2011
 In the Wild
BetatakinNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 16 2013
Lucyan
Hiking5.00 Miles
Hiking5.00 Miles   2 Hrs      2.50 mph
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
_____________________
Oct 06 2012
Hansenaz
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 Guides 4
 Routes 179
 Photos 6,920
 Triplogs 402

68 male
 Joined Apr 06 2005
 Phoenix, AZ
NE Arizona tour, AZ 
NE Arizona tour, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Oct 06 2012
Hansenaz
Hiking
Hiking
 no routes
1st trip
A 3-day Fall break trip to Navajo/Hopi land.

We spent an hour or so exploring the southern edge of Coal Mine Canyon (15mi south of Tuba City). What a fantastic place! Like stumbling across Bryce Canyon with no signs or fences. I wouldn't bring a dog or an 8-yr old.

Arrived at Navajo National Monument Sunday morning in time for the once-a-week Ranger guided tour to Betatakin Ruin. We (and 15 other well-geared hikers) were disappointed though when the hike was cancelled as the Ranger's helper didn't show up on time. This is another beautiful place and it would have been a perfect day for the long hike to Keet Seel - too bad the park is under-resourced. We walked the overlook trails which are well worth it..

Our first trip to Canyon de Chelly and we walked the White House Trail. This is a beautiful trail into a beautiful canyon - a little bit unfortunate that a wire fence keeps you well away from the ruin.

Monday morning we drove up First Mesa and took the Walpi walking tour. We were lucky to get there just in time to join the only tour of the day (done informally because it was a Hopi holiday). This is a tour more than a hike but we learned a lot of interesting things about Hopi history and modern life. If you have a few extra bucks buy some crafts from the residents.

Stopped at Homolovi on the way home. I was disappointed that the ruin wasn't heck of a lot more interesting than some of the local Perry Mesa Ruins but there was certainly a wider range of pottery types littering the ground.
Named place
Named place
Coal Mine Canyon
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Jun 19 2011
uphill_junkie
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 Guides 2
 Routes 9
 Photos 1,486
 Triplogs 944

female
 Joined Apr 28 2010
 Tucson, AZ
BetatakinNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 19 2011
uphill_junkie
Hiking4.40 Miles 990 AEG
Hiking4.40 Miles
990 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
wallyfrack
This was a bit more grueling than Saturday's hike, but only because we had to do it as a guided tour. :D Until the end when we were allowed to hike out at our own pace, it was quite entertaining with the little tantrum throwing children and people who looked like they've never hiked before. ](*,) And after our personal, informative tour on Saturday, the Betatakin ruins weren't nearly as impressive, especially since we couldn't even go within 100 yards of them. But, hey, we were there, and figured we might as well do it.

Again, my gps readings differ a lot from Wally's, but I'm going with his.
_____________________
No pants!
Jun 10 2011
GrottoGirl
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 Guides 3
 Routes 311
 Photos 11,581
 Triplogs 1,356

45 female
 Joined Sep 18 2009
 Tucson, AZ
BetatakinNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 10 2011
GrottoGirl
Hiking6.40 Miles 1,000 AEG
Hiking6.40 Miles
1,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
TUB - Group
squatpuke
I organized a trip to Keet Seel for the Tucson Backpackers Meetup. I didn't quit have a full group, so I posted an event on HAZ. In total there were six of us. It was nice to get to know squatpuke!

We stayed at the Sunset View Campground in Navajo National Park. The campground has nice sites, running water, and toilet paper. The best part was that it is FREE!

We got up early (Navajo's run on Daylight Savings Time) so that we could attend the 5-mile Betatakin tour that started at 8 AM. Our guide was a Navajo school teacher with a Microbiology degree. He had been working there about 3 weeks. We added a foreigner to our group before we drove to the TH, a German lady from Sweden.

On the way down, he pointed out a few rock cravings and a hand-and-toe-hold trail.

At the Ruins, we walked by the spring that was used by the dwellers. It was still flowing. Then we gathered in the alcove by the ruins. We were not able to go up into the ruins and look around. We were close enough to see the buildings - but not all the intricate details.

We also wandered over to look at the petroglyphs that are on the right side of the alcove (when you are looking at the alcove).

The hike out was a "GAYOP" so we took a break and then headed out. The later part of the hike I was with the German lady. She told me that her whole outlook of life had changed in the last few years as she was a cancer-survivor, like me. She now is doing everything she wanted to do (and dragging her husband and kids along for most of it). We both agreed that sometimes cancer is a good thing - it made us both go out and live a good life.

In the afternoon, we attended the Keet Seel Orientation. Then we did Canyon View trail to the historic Ranger Station and I also did the Aspen View trail again.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
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Jun 10 2011
squatpuke
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 Guides 5
 Routes 5
 Photos 1,479
 Triplogs 170

53 male
 Joined Apr 04 2002
 Flagstaff, AZ
BetatakinNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 10 2011
squatpuke
Hiking5.00 Miles
Hiking5.00 Miles   2 Hrs      2.50 mph
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
GrottoGirl
After initially seeing these ruins from the overlook near the VC, I was excited to see them up close. The other 3 Tucson'ers arrived around 11pm the night before to the Sunset View Campground. The next morning, after a brief introduction to my new friends, the six of us scurried off for our first group hike to Betatakin. Overall, there were 14 who had signed up the night before at the VC.

We started our hike early, 8am Navajo (7am Bellagonna) with our guide Paul Johnson (a traditional but friendly Navajo gentleman) whom we followed in our vehicles from the VC to the trail-head roughly one mile away. Since the first two miles of the trail are the same as Keet Seel, we all got an idea of what lie ahead for our Sat/Sun Keet trip.

Mr. Johnson knew his stuff. He was informative with his delivery albeit a bit soft-spoken; so I made sure I was nearby at all his interpretive breaks/talks. I learned quite a bit and was becoming more and more intrigued at each stop. (of course this later cost me 50 bone$ in informative reading material back at the book store).

We arrived at the Betatakin ruins but all were very disappointed that we could proceed no further than the base of the first section. An immense tease after expecting so much. (I found out later, they have been closed for more than year after several ignorant yahoos disrespectfully sat on walls and/or damaged the artifacts. I immediately thought the same would apply to Keet Seel.)

Never feeling fully satisfied, we reluctantly hiked back after a brief snack outside the gated area (the only area we were allowed to eat at near the ruins). The hike out was not bad with light day packs.

Overall, was a beautiful day to hike and our ranger was very interesting....the let down of not getting inside the ruins still isn't sitting well with me. :cry: but you can't beat the price....
_____________________
squatpuke@gmail.com
Jun 05 2011
Johnnie
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 Photos 792
 Triplogs 48

59 male
 Joined Nov 29 2009
 Gilbert, AZ
BetatakinNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 05 2011
Johnnie
Hiking5.00 Miles
Hiking5.00 Miles
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
glutz
I'm a little late posting sorry, Greg and Joel and I did this hike on the way back from Ute Mtn. Tribal Park, we missed doing it last year but made sure we got er done this year. just this hike by itself isnt too bad (a little hot on the way out) not quite the experience that Keet Seel was last year (you cannot enter the ruins area) but still worth it none the less. our guide was fantastic she shared as much with us about her family and tribe as she did about the ruins we really learned a lot.The hike was pretty straight forward. so I'll quit now and share some photos with you
Named place
Named place
Betatakin Canyon Navajo Mountain
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Oct 09 2010
toddak
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 Guides 8
 Routes 5
 Photos 1,187
 Triplogs 451

55 male
 Joined Nov 15 2005
 Puhoynix, AZ
BetatakinNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 09 2010
toddak
Hiking5.00 Miles 700 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   3 Hrs      1.67 mph
700 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Good time of year to visit this outstanding national monument - awesome Navajo sandstone canyons, amazing ruins and free camping!
_____________________
Sep 05 2010
AHOTE
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 Photos 32
 Triplogs 470

male
 Joined Nov 05 2006
 Chandler, AZ
BetatakinNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 05 2010
AHOTE
Hiking5.00 Miles
Hiking5.00 Miles
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
ChrisHikesAZ
_____________________
Jul 12 2010
PaleoRob
avatar

 Guides 161
 Routes 176
 Photos 5,662
 Triplogs 1,024

39 male
 Joined Apr 03 2006
 Grand Junction,
BetatakinNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 12 2010
PaleoRob
Hiking5.00 Miles 1,400 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   4 Hrs      1.25 mph
1,400 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
AAI - Event
HAZ - Event
I overslept and almost didn't make it! Thankfully my friend Maryellen rang the doorbell and 5:40. I quickly threw my crap together and we hit the road, getting to the Visitor's Center just after it opened. We put our names down and went back out to the truck to prep our packs. A few minutes later we heard the announcement to gather up in front of the VC, which we did. We met our guide for the day, a ~26 year-old Navajo woman named Cassandra Parrish. We caravan-ed to the trailhead, where we parked and formed the group. There was Cassandra, from Shonto/Kayenta, a group from Detroit, a group from somewhere else, a French-Canadian from Ontario, and Maryellen and myself from Page.
We started down the trail, and made a few stops along the way, Ranger Parrish explaining various things about the route. While she was Navajo, she made it very clear and very obvious that she had deep respect for the Hopi people, for whom Betatakin is one of their ancestral places (called Talastima in Hopi). A particularly notable view was overlooking Tsegi (or as Cassandra said it, "Say-yat" - a pronunciation that is new to me) Canyon to the north, all the way towards Navajo Mountain.
We descended down the old CCC/CWA stairs and switchbacks. We joked and talked, but knew that the ascent would be much less fun. Cassandra stopped us for a while below the rim, in the shade of a cliff, and we were told about many of the plants we'd seen, and how Navajos and Hopis use some of the plants. She also explained how many plants require special offerings in order to be able to harvest the leaves/seeds/berries/roots/etc. It was a fascinating stop and talk - Cassandra was obviously knowledgeable beyond simple book learning about such things. She was passionate about the subject.
Eventually our little group moved on, descending a sand dune that would be our bane on the hike out. Before we reentered the Monument's boundary, Cassandra gave us one more talk about some more of the local plants, including Rocky Mountain Bee Plant and various types of yucca. Then we were on to Betatakin.
While waiting to ascend to the ruin while a member of the group stopped at the bathroom, Cassandra and I talked for a little while. I asked her my usual question that I ask all rangers: "What is the stupidest question you've ever gotten here?" Her answer was one I've gotten before, out at the dam - people asking where to see "real Indians" wearing feathers and buckskin.
We climbed up into the Betatakin alcove, a yawning mouth of stone in the Navajo Sandstone. The ruins were amazing - the profusion of wood protruding not just as beams and door supports, but ladders, wall reinforcements, and other unknown uses was awesome! The buildings seemed perfect in places! Now, obviously, I've been to a lot of these places by now, so seeing some pretty intact set of ruins is not uncommon for me, but I was still stunned by the completeness of Talastima. I knew that some restoration had occurred back in the 1920's and 1930's, but even that did not diminish my impression.
We followed the old CCC trail to a ledge overlooking a set of mealing bins. It was on this part of the hike that I realized that I wouldn't get to go in and explore the intact, complete section of Betatakin, which was kind of disappointing. Cassandra set about giving some of the various stories about the region and Betatakin in specific, talking about Navajo, Hopi, and Zuni migration stories, in addition to the archaeological evidence. It was really a great talk - she presented all sides fairly and with much obvious respect. She mentioned what Betatakin means in Navajo ("House on a Ledge"), what Talastima means in Hopi ("Place of the Corn Tassel"). She also said another Hopi name for the place, which I cannot remember, but which meant "House Plastered Against the Rock". We wandered through the unrestricted section, admiring the views, and then headed down to the base of the cliff again, past the cool spring, and then up to another set of ruins. There were several clan symbols that the Hopi associate with along that section of cliff, Cassandra explained, including the Horn, Fire, Flute, and (if I recall correctly) Water Clans. That was it. The end. We were left to fend for ourselves at that point, and the 700' scrambled back up the cliff.
Maryellen and I set off, talking as we hiked, and generally cursing the sand dune we were climbing. By the time we hit the switchbacks we were in front of everyone else, but we had to take a breather about halfway up in the scanty shade of a pinon tree. The French-Canadian passed us at that point, and beat us up to the top (though not by much). We took up hiking along together and discovered that he was a character. We stopped to see if could, as Cassandra had suggested, eat a yucca seed pod. The flesh was hard and unappetizing, but we did each eat a couple of the seeds. I do not recommend it - tastes pretty icky. Not inedible, but certainly not going to be high on my menu list.
We made it back to the truck and hit the road to Kayenta, where we washed the taste of yucca out of our mouths with Burger King, and then headed back to Page. Another good trip in the books!
Geology
Geology
Navajo Sandstone
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial
_____________________
"The only thing we did was wrong was staying in the wilderness to long...the only thing we did was right was the day we started to fight..."
-Old Spiritual
My book, The Marauders on Lulu and Amazon
average hiking speed 1.98 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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