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360 triplogs

Nov 06 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Pivot Rock CanyonPayson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 06 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking4.94 Miles 500 AEG
Hiking4.94 Miles
500 ft AEG
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
AZBeaver
With snow blanketing the higher elevations, nothing would satisfy MJ other than a hike through the snow. She'd never been to Pivot Canyon and I doubted anyone else would venture there given the conditions, so that's where we headed.

Driving the forest roads wasn't too bad. Some intrepid souls had already made it through, so figured we could as well. Parked on a patch of clear ground and set off for some white stuff fun.

All was very quiet. Only a few tracks by deer, coyote, and rabbits marked the snow. Pivot Rock was cutely snow covered and decorated with ice icicles. Not much snow had accumulated at the mouth of Pivot Spring. We turned back and almost went straight back the vehicle, but I mentioned the old cabin ruins, though I didn't exactly know how far down the canyon they were. We opted to go find out. The hike there and back was pretty, but tiring given the footing. Boots were getting wet and cold by the time we got back to the truck.

A quick drive to Pine rewarded us with warm showers, cold drinks, good company, a nice dinner an later a very hot hot tub. Pretty decent day in the high country to kick off Fall/Winter.
Culture
Culture
Wooden Dwelling
Named place
Named place
Pivot Rock Canyon Pivot Rock Spring

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Pivot Rock Spring Dripping Dripping
A little drip out of the pipe and more running over the concrete lip of the cave.
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
Nov 05 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Boy Scout Loop from Emery Henderson TH - BCTPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 05 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking10.90 Miles 675 AEG
Hiking10.90 Miles   3 Hrs   10 Mns   3.44 mph
675 ft AEG
 
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Really nice afternoon. So after running some errands in Anthem, headed out to the Emory Henderson TH. Saw one mountain biker at the trailhead, otherwise had the trail to myself. Not a particularly pretty trail, but it's a nice workout.
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
Nov 02 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Bradshaw Mountains Apple Run, AZ 
Bradshaw Mountains Apple Run, AZ
 
4x4 Trip avatar Nov 02 2015
AZWanderingBear
4x4 Trip49.00 Miles
4x4 Trip49.00 Miles
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Stoic
On a previous 4x4 trip with Stoic ([ photoset ]) we found an apple tree at what was once a small settlement in the southern Bradshaw Mountains. Since there are no apples at Reavis Ranch this year, a run back to the apple trees seemed in order.

MJ and I met Stoic in Crown King. Stoic's a bit more dedicated than we are. He had been there since sunrise getting in a short hike and enjoying a morning on the mountain. Last time I'd brought my Jeep, but I figured the roads today were in pretty decent shape, so the winch on the Jeep would likely be unnecessary. MJ's XTerra Offroad model would match up nicely with Stoic's Pro4 model X. We aired down in the way up to CK, so the ride was quite nice all day.

Stoic had done some serious planning for some interesting stops along the way. He led out down Senator Highway. We drove straight through to the apple trees. Lots of apples hung from the first tree we found. They were about halfway between golf ball and baseball sized. Unfortunately they were a little past prime and sort of dry. The flavor was close to a Granny Smith though. But a nearby tree had some really juicy ones with a nicely tart flavor. We munched a few and took a bunch with us for later. Success! Hiking back to the trucks, I noticed something shiny in a clump of trash in the mud of a wash. Wound up pulling out the wringer portion of an antique Montgomery Ward washing machine.

Stoic led us farther southwest with stops at old structures, corrals, windmills, cemeteries, lakes, and ancient ruins. We hit a seldom seen portion of the Hassayampa River near an unused line shack for one of the many ranches in the area. Beautiful place.

A map hint on some graves led us to two well marked graves and likely another that was just outlined by rocks. Some research back at home reveals this is all that is left of the Wagoner Cemetery. There are many unmarked and lost graves on this bluff. The view from the burial sites is impressive. The flat area southwest was once the bottom of the reservoir behind the Walnut Grove Dam, which burst in 1890 claiming nearly 100 lives along the Hassayampa as far away as Wickenburg.

Stoic had made contact with the owner of the Gold Bar Ranch Bed and Breakfast located along Wagoner Road. He agreed to let us visit the lake on his property which is used as a camp. The old Walnut Grove Cemetery is also on his property. He also gave us a map to a little visited Hohokam ruin in the area. Stoic handled all the negotiations when we visited the property. I admired the collection of ranch related hardware and equipment on display around the place. He also had a nice collection of chickens and a very tidy garden. Nice guy and a nice place.

The lake was a true oasis with huge cottonwoods, cattails, some small row boats and even a rope swing in case you want to take dip. The cemetery had graves well over a hundred years old and some very recent ones as well. One of the Granite Mountain Hot Shots killed in the Yarnell Fire is interred here. The map to the ruins was accurate enough to remind me that I'd visited the site several many years ago. Stoic and MJ enjoyed the views as well as the ruins.

After checking out the Walnut Grove one-room school house and the chapel nearby, we stopped to check out the historic bridge over the Hassayampa since this was Stoic's first trip this far west on Wagoner Road.

49 miles after departing Crown King we emerged onto Highway 89. Was getting late and the day had been long, so we headed into Congress for dinner. Nichols West is a improbable little gem of a restaurant tucked away in the dusty hamlet of Congress. Even more improbable is that the seafood here is as good as you will find anywhere in AZ. They have it brought in fresh twice a week. I'd been craving their fried oysters all day -- just enough breading to provide a little crunch and huge plump juicy oysters. Ate them so fast that I forgot to take the obligatory food **** photo for posting. My lobster and shrimp pasta dish was first rate. MJ had a great chicken dish while Stoic enjoyed his salmon quesadilla after some initial misgivings about that particular combo.

After 180 miles and nearly 12 hours, we pulled back into our garage. Was a great day trip and we really appreciate all the effort Stoic put into this successful outing.
Flora
Flora
Apple
Fauna
Fauna
Cow Honey Bee
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Light
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
1 archive
Oct 28 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
CirclestoneGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 28 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking7.45 Miles 1,799 AEG
Hiking7.45 Miles
1,799 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Oregon_Hiker
trekkin_gecko
This was day three of our Superstitions adventure. The previous day’s backpack into Reavis made us appreciate hiking with just a day pack. The morning was cool and perfect for a good outing as we left our camp in Elisha Reavis’ beautiful valley. Circlestone was the group objective. Kelly and I had an eye to topping Mound Mountain as well. Was the first time on any of these trails for any of the four.

Fireline Trail was in good shape. Conversation was flowing nicely along the way. Everyone was in good spirits after a good night in camp and a great breakfast. (Triplog for the backpacking portion of the trip is here:http://hikearizona.com...).

Didn’t take long before we were headed up a surprisingly good trail to Circlestone. A bit before arriving at our destination there was a very nice fire ring in a perfect circle with a bit of flourish to its build. MJ asked if that was our destination, obviously underwhelmed.

Everything about Circlestone is impressive but simultaneously mysterious. The location provides amazing views, but what was the significance of this site? The stone works are large and obviously required great effort, perhaps multigenerational commitment, but to what purpose? The interior rooms and walls appear a bit random, but were they? One points towards Four Peaks, perhaps the home of the Great Spirit? Others seem to coincide with the sunrise and sunset of the summer and winter solstices, a Stonehenge-like calendar? The views extend all the way to the Phoenix Valley where Hohokam canals watered villages and crops, so visual communication via large fires? A bee landed on Larry’s arm and remained peacefully for 15 minutes. Was he attempting to give us answers or had he just found a cheap source of salt? Can I come up with other things I don’t understand about this place?

We all explored and took photos. Kelly and I kept looking up towards Mound Mountain, the highest peak in the Superstitions. Larry and MJ wanted no part of what would likely be a lot of bushwhacking to the summit. Kelly and I left them agreeing to meet back at camp later.

We both had tracks on our respective GPSs to keep us somewhat on track. Immediately I got us on the wrong side of the drift fence that extends out of Circlestone. Kelly gracefully slid under as I held the barbed wire up, me less so a few seconds later. We found a trace of a trail and made good time until we were about 700’ from the summit. A thicket of chest-high scrub oaks mixed with manzanita and other thorny things made going up tough. We took the path of least resistance where we could and finally hit the ridge a few hundred feet from the summit. We rock hopped most of the rest of the way to the obvious summit boulder arriving with a minimum of bloodletting.

Artists have not the brushes or oils to recreate the hues of landscape from this vantage. Poets possess not the words to convey the elation of sitting astride a mountain range of incredible austerity and rugged beauty. Film fails to capture the immensity of what lay below.

Modern humans build homes and cities and farms and factories in the valleys and plains. The level places feed our bodies and fills our needs. But the human spirit finds succor in the high places. We equate evil with low and godliness with high. While there are canyons I love and valleys that are beautiful, nothing is as exhilarating or as spiritual as pulling yourself up onto the summit of a remote mountain top. I’ve little doubt that the builders and maintainers of Circlestone came to the same place Kelly and I now found ourselves for exactly the same reason we ventured up here. We think we know more than they did, but we don’t. We simply know different than they did. We use GPS. They knew the land too intimately to ever have needed one. We know how large the world is. They knew the place they lived in minute detail; every plant, animal, noise, and season. But we both, then, now, and I suspect forever, are in awe of high places and the eternity of the view from there and the effect it has on your soul.

We took the obligatory summit shots and signed the register under FOTG. Kelly read off entries from the tattered register, many from HAZ, worthy adventurers all, with even a few who have gone onto perhaps higher places. We pulled out our lunch with Kelly taking her’s atop the summit boulder and for a while being the highest object in the Superstitions. Each of us pointed out landmarks known and ones we weren’t quite sure of. Four Peaks loomed. The backside of 5024 and the Flatiron and the Ridgeline seemed small from here. Kelly spotted Camelback, though Phoenix was hidden in the haze of the day. The Mogollon Rim was not clear but visible. The Sierra Anchas were just over there beyond the scar of the mines at Superior. We weren’t sure which peak was White Mountain, having left our maps back in camp. Mostly we just soaked in the feeling of being on top.

Time came to leave, all be it reluctantly. We stepped off the summit, hesitating a second for one more look just to more fully etch the experience into our psyche. The climb down was far easier. Kelly led and chose a very efficient route and with little effort we emerged back on the trail just below Circlestone. Our sense of accomplishment made the hike back to camp light with great conversation. MJ and Larry greeted us in camp, everyone with huge smiles. Kelly and I were glad we had summited Mound. They were equally happy to have passed on the bushwhacking after seeing our battle scars. It was a good day.
Culture
Culture
Benchmark
Named place
Named place
Reavis Ranch
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
4 archives
Oct 27 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Reavis Ranch via 109 SouthGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Backpack avatar Oct 27 2015
AZWanderingBear
Backpack15.69 Miles 2,451 AEG
Backpack15.69 Miles3 Days         
2,451 ft AEG43 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Oregon_Hiker
trekkin_gecko
The plan had evolved over some months. I’d wanted to revisit Reavis Ranch, but come in from the south. My only trip to Reavis’ apple orchard had been 2 years ago entering from the north (http://hikearizona.com.... Mary Jo (MJ) had never backpacked but wanted to try. She found the thought of a camp with less than a thousand pounds of gear extremely intimidating, but slightly intriguing. And the idea of bragging to her friends about backpacking to Reavis Ranch sealed the deal.

The south Reavis trail offered options to visit other sites on my wish list – Rogers Canyon Ruins, Elisha’s grave, Circlestone, perhaps even Mound Mountain. The scope of the trip expanded, becoming both more difficult and yet more appealing. It was definitely going to be a demanding first backpacking trip for a woman north of 60. But MJ seldom backs down from a challenge.

At Angela’s recent birthday bash, I mentioned the evolving plan to Kelly. Reavis was on her sort-o- bucket list (only high places are on her real bucket list). After revealing the other possible destinations (Mound Mountain being a real draw for her) she was definitely in. We happily welcomed the Trekkin Gecko to join our adventure. Larry overheard the conversation and mentioned he was interested as well, never having explored that portion of the Supes. Visions of obscure and almost never visited ruins were obviously dancing through his head. Our foursome was formed.

We rendezvoused at the Rogers Trough trailhead, empty of vehicles on this Monday morning. We’d day hike to Rogers Canyon Ruins and return to camp at the trailhead and then head to Reavis the next morning. Just as we shouldered our day packs, a lone figure with a massive backpack came up the trail. This young man had been out for almost a week and his plan had been for nearly a week more. Events had not gone as he had planned apparently. He ask with some eagerness in his voice if we might happen to be driving out since his planned ride home wouldn’t be there before Saturday. Larry was preparing to drive him at least as far as it took to get a message out when Kelly realized she had just enough cell reception to send a text message. Once the young man had established contact with his support, Kelly left him her phone and we set out for the ruins. The triplog for that hike is here:http://hikearizona.com...

The night at the trailhead passed uneventfully except my finicky inflatable sleeping mat deflated during the wee hours. It would be impossible to reflate the mat inside the confines of our 2-person Big Agnes tent and to do so outside would wake everyone. I’d placed a microscopically thin closed cell foam pad below the inflatable pad to protect from punctures. While offering no cushion, the closed cell pad did keep me insulated from the cold and very hard ground of the trailhead parking lot. At least it was a full moon. The huge moon in the clear sky combined with the classically orange Big Agnes tent creating the effect of trying to sleep inside a brightly lit jack-o-lantern. Meanwhile, my newbie backpacker wife snored contentedly through the whole thing. We were off to a great start.

After a seeming eternity, morning finally broke. Kelly popped out of her tent. Larry opened the hatch on his FJ. MJ crawled from our tent, stretched and asked if I had coffee made. All appeared so disgustingly rested. After breakfast and coffee and repacking our packs and securing the vehicles, we were off like a herd of turtles.
We visited Elisha Marcus Reavis’ grave fulfilling one of my primary desires for the trip. The arduous slog up to the saddle was slow, but rewarding as we topped out on to the pretty portion of the hike. MJ handled her 30+ pound pack well. We snapped the obligatory photos at the huge alligator juniper with Kelly climbing into its branches as she is prone to do with anything large and vertical. Good water began flowing shortly before the Fireline Trail intersection. We dropped our heavy packs at the southern end of the Valley and scouted for a good camp spot near water settling on a well-used site near the old cattle chute. The orchard was disappointingly bare, not a single apple to be found. After a snack for four trail-worn hikers, camp went up quick. Larry and I fussed with our gravity water filters down at the nice clear pool near camp. Dinner was a variety of Mountain House’s finest recipes. By 7 p.m., the other three were ensconced in their tents. I elected to sleep under the stars beside our tent. That way I could add air if need be to my expensive unreliable mat. Besides, sleeping out provides a deeper connection to a place, at least for me. The mat held through the night and I snored enough to exact some portion of revenge for the previous night.

With only a day hike planned, we slept in until 5 minutes after sunrise. The morning was cool and bright. Oatmeal and coffee seemed to be the breakfast du jour amongst the group. Finished with her oats, MJ mentioned we had neglected to have dessert the evening before. She seductively dangled the unopened Backpacker Pantry dehydrated Coconut Key Lime Pie. I won’t say Kelly actually drooled, but …. If you’ve never had Key Lime Pie for breakfast, gotta say you have missed out.

We set off for Circlestone and perhaps an attempt at Mound Mountain. Triplog for that day hike is here.http://hikearizona.com...

Back at camp, we lounged for a bit. Kelly wanted to see the intersection of the Reavis Gap trail. We found another well-used campsite just up the Gap Trail. Someone had abandoned a fairly heavy tarp. MJ laid claim to the property and Larry drug it back to camp with us, everyone else bringing along some firewood. Dinner was a variety of dehydrated Italian concoctions. Backpacker Pantry makes a decent dehydrated Crème Brulee so we shared our second dessert of the day. I got a fire started. Some packets of apple cider were prepared. A flask of Fireball appeared miraculously from the recesses of someone’s pack. We recounted a very good day, discussed the impending weather, and changed channels on our backpacker TV (i.e. added firewood to the fire). We lasted to nearly 8 pm.

Just after 3, a rain drop interrupted my slumbering dreams of peaks and trails and camps. Low heavy clouds were moving quickly from the South. I tapped the side of the tent. “Make a hole. I’m coming in.” Rolled up my sougan and dove into the tent. Rain pittered on the camp off and on. About daybreak there was a slight pause in the precipitation. Kelly’s voice, a tent away, mentioned that tarp MJ acquired would make a nice shelter. I was already scrounging in my strewn about gear for some ridgeline cordage. Larry was already about in full rain gear. Together we strung a half decent shelter. Breakfast was quick. Gear got organized and packed inside the tents for the three of us hiking out. Larry, who planned to stay on a few more days, helped filter water for our hike out. Everyone was glancing skyward trying to read the weather. We donated a couple of packs of food and a partial flask of Fireball to Larry. He might have to spend some hours in his tent or under our new shelter over the next couple of days, but at least he’d be happy and full.

At 9ish, MJ, Kelly and I shouldered our packs under a sky with some hopeful areas of blue sky between some unhappy gray clouds. At least it wasn’t raining on us now. MJ led out with a pace that amazed both Kelly and I. We spotted a whitetail doe within the first mile. She seemed more curious than scared, unusual since it is hunting season. A brief shower hit us about an hour into the hike, but it was light. We took one of our quick breaks at the Saddle overjoyed to see mostly blue sky in front of us. We were flagging a bit on the climb up to the trailhead. Kelly suggested a 30-second break. She praised MJ’s pace and mentioned since we were doing so well there might be time to take a side trip to Guayo’s El Rey for some Mexican, her treat. MJ fairly levitated the remaining distance. We hit the trailhead still dry only 3 hours and 38 minutes after bidding farewell to Larry back at Reavis.

Having spent the previous three days in the same clothes, we took the opportunity to clean up quickly and change. The drive out was just as bumpy as it was driving in, but the views are impressive. Significant wind and rain hit us before we reached pavement. Our quick hike out was obviously a good decision. We hoped Larry stayed dry and safe.
Guayo’s is the perfect post hike stop. MJ marveled at the whole concept of running water and a real bathroom. Her new appreciation for chairs and tables was clearly evident. We inhaled a cheese crisp and individual plates of tasty cheesy foods with names that ended in “o” or “a”.

This was a good adventure with a great mix of people. MJ had successfully completed her first backpacking trip, picking up an appreciation of the challenges and rewards. We’d definitely cemented a friendship with Kelly and have no doubt there will be plenty more adventures we will share. Getting to know Larry was a treat. Our differing experiences and common passions are a good mix. In the end, we all got what we came for. Doesn’t get better than that.
Flora
Flora
Alligator Juniper
Culture
Culture
Cairn Campsite
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Reavis Creek at Fireline #118 Medium flow Medium flow
Good flow. Plenty to filter.

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Reavis Creek at Gap Trail #117 Pools to trickle Pools to trickle
Several good pools along the Ranch where the stream comes back to the surface. Water was good except near the old ranch house foundation.
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
5 archives
Oct 26 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Rogers Canyon RuinsGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 26 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking8.81 Miles 1,209 AEG
Hiking8.81 Miles
1,209 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Oregon_Hiker
trekkin_gecko
Kelly, Larry, MJ and I left the trailhead just after 11 on the first hike of our multiday adventure in the Superstitions. Was the first time to the ruins for all four. We wanted to be back at the trailhead before dark to have a chance to set up camp while still spending some time exploring the ruins, so we moved fairly quickly but comfortably down the trail. Lots of water in the upper stretches of Rogers Canyon, but none below the intersection with the Reavis Ranch Trail. We were impressed with the lushness the Canyon floor and the variety of flora. Just a hint of Fall color was peeking through and there were even a very few scattered wild flowers remaining.

Eventually spotted the alcoves housing the Salado Ruins. Climbed up and explored the lower levels. Kelly found the route to the upper ruins. Definitely had a bit of exposure. MJ elected to enjoy the photos when we got home. Kelly assisted Larry and me with the climb. Both Larry and I enjoy ruins, so we were in heaven exploring and photographing these well preserved dwellings. Somehow I doubt my current home will be around 600 years from now. I must say the view up the canyon from the ruins is fantastic. The original residents picked a great place to live.

We had a quick snack on the lower level after a few moments of heart pounding down climb. Thanks again Kelly. MJ went off to find the perfect spot for a bathroom break. She found one slightly outside a half-mile radius. I am so happy to be male.

The hike back is uphill, of course, but we made it back to the vehicles in good time. The ruins had proved a good appetizer to our adventure.

The remainder of the trip is here:http://hikearizona.com...
Named place
Named place
Rogers Canyon
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
3 archives
Oct 03 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Ramsey Canyon LoopTucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 03 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking9.31 Miles 2,990 AEG
Hiking9.31 Miles
2,990 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Day 7 of our 8-day SE AZ road trip. Today was to be our last big hike. The Ramsey Canyon B&B had played host to us the previous night and would again tonight. Located right next to the Preserve, it was the optimum base for enjoying Ramsey Canyon. After a great breakfast, we shouldered our packs and walked over to the Preserve.

Seems we were lucky in our timing. First Saturdays are free admission at the Preserve. They were also having a guided nature walk. Might be a good idea. But when we discovered it was 2 hours and covered a half mile, we opted out. Would have loved to hear all the good info, but we wanted miles.

The creek was flowing nicely which gave us that wonderful mountain stream background sound off and on all day. Some random clouds were moving quickly across the peaks and saddles above us and providing nice shade in the few open places on the trail. Combined with ample tree cover from the sycamores, spruce, pine, oaks, junipers and madrones. The conditions were perfect for a good hike.

Did the little side loops off the mail trail in the Preserve checking out all the abandoned buildings left over from the long history of people enjoying this canyon. Some birders were out along the trail, but fewer than usual according to the B&B owner. We tried to be quiet and not intrude. Hit the first real incline and topped out at the overlook. There's some interesting geology on display across the canyon.

Dropped back down to the creek and it was really flowing nicely. Even found a very nice bubbling spring off to the south of the creek. There were still areas of bright wildflowers and a hint here and there of Fall color to come.

Veered off on Pat Scott to check out the old mine and equipment. Looks like they even had a small stamp mill here for crushing the ore. We weren't convinced we wanted to do the whole loop, so after a bit we turned back.

At the lower end Pat Scott we didn't really want to start back down, so we went further up Hamburg. After a bit we took stock of our time and energy remaining. We were only .68 (straight line) below Bear Saddle. MJ wanted to go to the top and I didn't see any reason why not, so up we went. Hamburg is steep in this area, so we were huffing and puffing when we met three hikers coming down, (now I think it was knnorby's group). They told us they'd seen a large black bear over on Pat Scott earlier. The bear was totally nonaggressive. Damn we should have gone on up. However, the news put MJ on high alert. A LARGE pile of scat in the trail didn't help her much. But we pressed.

The wind at the saddle was really howling. A 100 feet on the trail below the saddle was nearly calm. MJ held onto her hat while doing a Chevy Chase looking into the Grand Canyon imitation and headed back down. I took some photos and enjoyed the view for a few moments more and followed her down. We snacked sitting a convenient rock with big grins on our faces.

The trip down was uneventful, much easier, and just a beautiful. As we got close to the trailhead there were lots of people taking afternoon hikes. Certainly was a great day for it.

Back at the B&B there was a fresh cherry pie set out. The Ramsey Canyon B&B is known for their daily pies. Tough decision ahead -- post hike beer and then pie or pie then beer??? Why is life so difficult? (Decision was tiny slice of pie, beer, then larger slice of pie. A perfect solution is not always available, but when it is just go for it.)

I like Ramsey. We will be back for more.
Named place
Named place
Ramsey Canyon
Meteorology
Meteorology
Autumn - Color Foliage
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
6 archives
Oct 01 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Bisbee Tombstone and Lowell Culture Stroll AZ, AZ 
Bisbee Tombstone and Lowell Culture Stroll AZ, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Oct 01 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking5.00 Miles 700 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles
700 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Day 5 of our 8-day southeastern AZ road trip found us breaking camp early and headed to Bisbee for the night. We stopped off at Sandy's Restaurant at the intersection of 191 and 181 near Sunizona for a fantastic breakfast. Service was fast and attentive. The decor was All-American down to the flags outside. We gobbled the food like we were starving. Sandy was so impressed we asked if we wanted dessert.

Was a quick drive to Bisbee. The nice manager of the Bisbee Grand let us check in early, probably noticing that we were anxious for (and obviously in need of) a good hot shower. We strolled around town for the afternoon snapping photos, and visiting the sites, and having libations at the Copper Queen with a very entertaining bartender, though she preferred the term "professional mixologist". Even went over to Lowell, the nearby ghost town I'd never heard of. Dinner was at Roka, highly recommended but make reservations.

Headed north the next morning for a touristy visit to Tombstone. I'd never been there. MJ had and was ready to go after 5 minutes. We spent 4 hours. But you just have to see the gunfight at the OK Corral reenactment, don't you? Bought a t-shirt and a bad hamburger at one of the saloons. Sat by the guy who had just played Doc Holiday in the gunfight. He was posting stuff to his Facebook page via his smart phone, but did know that Holiday was born in GA near where I grew up. However, he didn't know that Holiday, according to local legend, engaged in his first shooting as a teenager during a dispute about a favorite swimming hole down on the river. After I informed him of this he sniffed and returned to his phone, wiser but unimpressed.

Did Boot Hill and purchased ice for the cooler and libations for later that evening at the historic Wyatt Earp's Minute Market near Boot Hill.

Commemorated my first (and likely only) time in Bisbee and Tombstone with a video. Enjoy. https://www.youtube.co...
Culture
Culture
Humor Stagecoach
Named place
Named place
Boothill Cemetery
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
1 archive
Sep 30 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Big Loop - Chiricahua National MonumentTucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 30 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking9.71 Miles 3,140 AEG
Hiking9.71 Miles
3,140 ft AEG
 
1st trip
We were up at dawn on day 4 of our 8-day SE AZ road trip. The night before we'd been chastised by the camp host at Bonita Campground for taking a shower. Apparently no water was allowed to touch the ground inside the campground. We were also not to tie anything to a tree or use the sink in the rest rooms for anything beyond washing our hands. She said we should have brought a lot of baby wipes if we planned to camp and then returned to her 40-foot motor home and ran the generator all night. With a quick breakfast we headed out to the Echo Canyon trailhead, conspiring along the way on the best method for stealth showers.

Started the Big Loop counter clockwise, so down Echo Canyon trail. Doesn't take too long to get to the grottoes. The rhyolite formations are reminiscent of the Fairyland Loop at Bryce in a way. We were all smiles and anxious for what might be ahead. Wall Street was impressive and then we descended into the cool of Echo Canyon. Progress was slow as we took time to ooh and ahh and photograph everything.

Hit the Hailstone Trail and could see across the canyon where we'd be gaining back the elevation we were losing. The Upper Rhyolite turned us back west with several stream crossings. Soon we began the slow slog up the Sarah Deming trail along the west side of the canyon of the same name. While it was a steady uphill, there was shade and the grade was such that we made good time until the last hundred yards or so. The last bit of scrambling brought us back up on top of the formations and right to the beginning of the Heart of Rocks Loop.

The Heart or Rocks Loop is a geologic playground. The trail requires a bit of scrambling and can be difficult to follow at times. We did notice that back in the day someone had painted red footprints on the slick rock areas. While worn, these were still faintly visible at just the right time to keep a careful trekker on the trail. A majority of the named formations are along this trail. Signs point out the more famous -- Duck on a Rock, Punch and Judy, Thors Hammer, Pinnacle Balanced Rock, etc. We took a lunch break amongst the rhyolite formations. On our way back out of the Loop we heard voices and ran into the only hikers we'd see during the entire hike -- a group of ladies who were going clockwise and thus opposite us.

Turned east on Big Balanced Rock Trail and paid homage to its namesake. This trail was level and moderately scenic. We moved quickly. I'd kept the Inspiration Point Trail as a way to extend or shorten the total hike. If we were doing well, then it was out to the point. If we were dragging then we'd blow it off. We didn't even stop to discuss it and turned to the point. The hike is pretty flat. This area was burned years back, so there's not much to see until you hit the end. Then it is just pick a way you want to scramble out to enjoy the view and take photos down the length of Rhyolite Canyon. It was truly inspirational.

The only thing left was Mushroom Rock Trail and then Ed Riggs back to the trailhead. We were tiring and we descended along Mushroom Rock knowing we'd have to climb again right at the end of the hike. It was still pretty, but the heat and the climb made us ready to be reminiscing on how great the day had been as we sipped a cold one back in camp.

With high spirits and high fives we topped out at the parking lot. Definitely the highlight of our days in the Chiricahuas.
Geology
Geology
Rhyolite
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Echo Canyon Pools to trickle Pools to trickle

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Hunt Canyon Pools to trickle Pools to trickle

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Sarah Deming Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
Nice flow down in the canyon

water 1 out of 5water less than maxwater less than maxwater less than max Totem Canyon Pools to trickle Pools to trickle
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
4 archives
Sep 29 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Natural Bridge Trail - Chiricahua N.M.Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 29 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking4.68 Miles 968 AEG
Hiking4.68 Miles
968 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Day 3 of our 8-day Southeastern AZ road trip.

Had a quick breakfast in camp before heading out for this hike. No cars at the little pull-out trailhead, and we'd see no one on the trail either.

The start is just a slog uphill through the burned out area. Definitely got the lungs pumping. Once on top it was fun crossing the plateau with nice long views west. Saw the first deer of the many we'd see during the day. Dropped down into the next drainage and enjoyed some shade in the pine grove that wasn't effected by the fire. Surprisingly a good bit of water as well.

The bridge is a nice little treat at the end of the trail. Took a short break to admire nature's handiwork and headed back. Lots more trails to do before the day was done.

Saw a small black bear just west of the trailhead. MJ's first bear in the wild. He was quite plump and healthy and only interested in putting distance between us and him.
Geology
Geology
Rhyolite
Named place
Named place
Chiricahua Natural Bridge
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Moderate

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max North Bonita Canyon Light flow Light flow
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
6 archives
Sep 29 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Sugarloaf Mountain 7310 - Chiricahua NMTucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 29 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking2.00 Miles 480 AEG
Hiking2.00 Miles
480 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Second hike of the day and probably the most under rated hike in the Chiricahua Monument. Parking lot was empty. Looks like the trip up would be steep, but except for the last few hundred feet it's very gentle.

Views were fantastic all the way up. The little tunnel created by the CCC back in the day was a nice surprise. Great look at Cochise head as you climb. Were a bunch of caterpillars on the rocks and shrubs. The 360 views from the top are fantastic. Gave us a nice preview of tomorrow's Big Loop hike.
Flora
Flora
Banana Yucca
Geology
Geology
Rhyolite
Culture
Culture
Fire Lookout Structures
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Substantial
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
3 archives
Sep 28 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Silver Spur Meadow TrailTucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 28 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking3.68 Miles 150 AEG
Hiking3.68 Miles
150 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Day 2 of our 8-day Southeastern AZ road trip.

Great breakfast at Cochise Stronghold B&B. Stretched out legs on the Cochise Nature Trail and then drove over to the Chiricahua National Monument and checked in at the Bonita campground. After setting up camp we headed over to Faraway Ranch. Much of the trail is shaded. There were deer everywhere it seemed.

Really enjoy old ranches, cabins, and ruins. While strolling around the place an obscure song kept creeping into my mind. So in lieu of too many photos, here's what I was hearing in my head.

https://www.youtube.co...
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Bonita Canyon Light flow Light flow
Nice flow

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Silver Spur Spring Quart per minute Quart per minute
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
6 archives
Sep 28 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Cochise Stronghold Nature TrailTucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 28 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking0.35 Miles 59 AEG
Hiking0.35 Miles
59 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Day 2 of our 8-day road trip through SE AZ began with a really good breakfast at the Cochise Stronghold B&B. We ate on the patio with our friends the hummingbirds, the chickens that layed the eggs we were eating, and the B&B's very friendly cat. Not a bad start to the day.

We packed up and drove the very short distance to the campground to stroll the nature trail in the cool before heading off to the Chiricahuas.
Named place
Named place
Rockfellow Dome
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
Sep 27 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Cochise Stronghold Trail #279Tucson, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 27 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking7.24 Miles 1,136 AEG
Hiking7.24 Miles
1,136 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners partners
AZBeaver
Day 1 of an 8-day road trip through Southeastern AZ. Had lunch in Benson and left our vehicle at the Cochise Stronghold B&B just outside the campground. Great place, BTW.

Had never hiked the Stronghold before. Was a bit warm at the start, but some of the trail was shaded and the scenery was great. Even a few wildflowers left to enjoy and there were even hints of Autumn colors here and there. Enjoyed the Saddle and then headed back down. Explored the campground and its informative signs about the history of the Stronghold.

We'd brought chili and other provisions since its a ways to any place to eat and most are closed on a Sunday night anyway. Hurried through dinner and went outside to catch the total eclipse. With the moon still below the eastern hills, it was seriously dark providing a great star gazing opportunity. Even saw a few meteors. Took advantage of the hot tub to watch the eclipsed moon rise above the eastern hills. Made for a nice end to the first day of the trip.
Named place
Named place
Halfmoon Tank
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Moderate

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Halfmoon Tank 76-100% full 76-100% full

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water less than maxwater less than max Johns Well Quart per minute Quart per minute
_____________________
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And the place you need to reach
6 archives
Sep 17 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Humphreys B-24 Bomber Crash SiteFlagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 17 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking7.23 Miles 2,147 AEG
Hiking7.23 Miles
2,147 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
Great day to be hiking up a mountain. Felt rather somber at GZ having 29 years ago survived an F-16 crash saved only by only a few seconds and some technology unavailable to the crew of this old bomber. Sat among the wreckage for a good while just gazing out across the impressive view. The strut on the landing gear (where the flag hangs) looks almost new. Placed my hand on it and said a quiet prayer that the souls lost here are at peace.
Culture
Culture
Airplane Wreckage
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
4 archives
Sep 16 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Red Mountain Trail #159Flagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 16 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking3.15 Miles 578 AEG
Hiking3.15 Miles
578 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Spent a bit of time in the interior of the blow out. Very intersting geology. Found numerous Apache Tears along the trail outbound.
Flora
Flora
Purple Loco
Named place
Named place
Red Mountain
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
2 archives
Sep 02 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Colonel Devin Trail #290Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 02 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking4.37 Miles 1,270 AEG
Hiking4.37 Miles
1,270 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Last day 3 of my 4-day solo camp on the Rim. Link to the camp triplog: http://hikearizona.com...

After packing up camp, I stopped off at the Battle Ground marker and headed down towards the Washington Park trailhead. The upper part of this trail is steep and mostly loose rock. But it gets better quickly. There was a good breeze and some cloud cover, both making this very enjoyable.

Some heavy equipment had used the lower portion of the trail as a route up to a side road. Along the way they'd done some heavy trail maintenance. At least the loose dirt was better than the loose rocks up top. Saw a hiker going up along this part of the trail.

Had a quick snack beside the stream at the lower trailhead. Pretty spot.

Headed uphill and ran into the same hiker as before. He'd been to the top. We chatted for a few moments and I mentioned HAZ. He wasn't aware, but seemed appreciative of the info.

Made better time going up than anticipated. Rain started just as I reached the Jeep. Time to go home, but this was anice leg stretcher before the drive back to the heat of the Valley.
Named place
Named place
East Verde River
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 Pieper Hatchery Spring Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
Nice flow.
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
4 archives
Sep 01 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Fred Haught Trail #141Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 01 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking10.87 Miles 1,007 AEG
Hiking10.87 Miles
1,007 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Day 3 of my 4-day solo camp on the Rim. Link to the camp triplog: http://hikearizona.com...

After a stormy night, I made breakfast and then drove over to General Springs and headed north up Fred Haught. There was lots of water along the way. There was no one on the trail and even the footprints were gone courtesy of the rain. The area is very green right now.

Went as far as FR 95 and turned back. Ran into a small horned toad, a little snake, a couple of a very small ATV back at the trailhead.

Saw 3 elk on the drive back to camp. A cold beverage and an afternoon nap were a fitting end to a good hike.
Named place
Named place
General Springs Canyon Mogollon Rim
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Box Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
Plenty of water along the canyon.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max Fred Haught Canyon Medium flow Medium flow
Lots of water available. Mostly runoff.

dry General Springs Dry Dry

dry Quien Sabe Spring Dry Dry
Just some mud.
_____________________
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And the place you need to reach
4 archives
Aug 31 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Bear Canyon Upper - East Bear Canyon LoopPayson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 31 2015
AZWanderingBear
Hiking4.83 Miles 721 AEG
Hiking4.83 Miles   4 Hrs      1.61 mph
721 ft AEG   1 Hour    Break
 
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Day 2 of my 4-day camp above Bear Canyon.

Dropped down into East Bear Canyon from my camp up on FR 300G via a steep drainage. Lots of water at the bottom. Slowly worked north to the confluence with Bear Canyon. Foraged along the way on the last of the season's wild raspberries. Also sampled some salad greens growing in abundance (common plantain and dandelion).

The confluence with Bear Canyon has a very large pool. Just north of the confluence I found a huge dead pine along the eastern slope that groaned with each gust of wind. The roots of this ancient giant grew straight out of a sandstone wall. The roots had split the rock. That is gonna be some kind of a crash when this thing comes down.

Back tracked south and took an unnamed drainage that would lead me back fairly close to my camp. Quarter mile in or so I got cliffed out by a 30 foot waterfall. Took a sketchy route along the western slope instead of surrendering. Found a matched elk shed in the drainage. It was several years old and partially deteriorated, but the upper third of one was still solid and will make some nice handles on some future craft projects. Scared up two elk, a cow and yearling, about 500 feet from my camp.

I do love the Rim!

Link to the camp trip report: http://hikearizona.com...
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 300G Tank Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
90% full

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 East Bear Canyon Heavy flow Heavy flow
Plenty of water to filter. Large pools and good flow.

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water less than max East Bear Canyon Creek Medium flow Medium flow
Lots of water

water 1 out of 5water 2 out of 5water 3 out of 5water 4 out of 5 East Bear Canyon Tank Gallon + per minute Gallon + per minute
90% full
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
3 archives
Aug 30 2015
AZWanderingBea
avatar

 Guides 27
 Routes 62
 Photos 2,620
 Triplogs 700

63 male
 Joined Jan 23 2008
 Phoenix, AZ
Camp Thunder Bear, AZ 
Camp Thunder Bear, AZ
 
Car Camping avatar Aug 30 2015
AZWanderingBear
Car Camping
Car Camping4 Days         
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Headed up to the Mogollon Rim and FR 300G near Bear Canyon for a solo 4-day camping and hiking trip. Besides hiking, I planned to complete some classes for a bushcraft certification I am working on. The framed shelter and fire reflector lessons were on the list. Rained three of the four days, so the shelter lesson was put to the test. Neither me nor my gear was ever wet. With the location near Bear Canyon and the storms, we will call this one Camp Thunder Bear. Here’s a recap with a video of below.

Day 1:
- 120 mile drive from home up onto the Mogollon Rim
- Selected a site on the ridge between East Bear Canyon and Bear Canyon at an elevation of 7600’
- Built a framed shelter using 4 poles and a 10x10 plastic tarp
- Strung a second 10x10 tarp as a kitchen and work area
- Carved a spatula and chopsticks for the kitchen using my axe, hatchet, and new bush lore style Moreau Cutlery custom, now dubbed the Bear Lore. I designed it. Mike Moreau forged it for me. I'm liking it.
- Oysters and bugling elk as an appetizer
- Rained for 30 minutes at 3am, stayed dry in my shelter

Day 2:
- Made a fire and cooked traditional Scottish bannock using a Zebra pot with a titanium bowl inside as an oven
- Bannock, scrambled eggs, fried Spam and cowboy coffee for breakfast
- Broke the axe cutting firewood (guess the hafting an axe elective is coming up soon)
- Hiked down into East Bear Canyon, thence into Bear Canyon and followed an unnamed drainage back to near camp http://hikearizona.com...
- Browsed on wild raspberries, common plantain, and dandelions
- Found and old elk shed, kept one half of it for future fire steel handles and what not
- Scared up two elk, a cow and yearling, about 500’ from camp
- Constructed fire reflector
- Cut 10 inches off the top of a fatwood stump to use as a Swedish torch later (rained out)
- Three hours of rain and thunderstorms began about 6 in the evening. More rain later in the night. Shelter held up keeping me and sleeping bag dry.
- Made dinner under my tarp
- Retreated to the jeep when the lightening got close. Eight hikers were struck by lightning earlier this year on a similar ridgeline about six miles east of my camp. One fatality, one serious injury, others minor injuries. Better safe than sorry.

Day 3
- Woke to a cold, wet morning, but I was dry and warm. Digging the shelter.
- Quick breakfast and then off to hike the Fred Haught Trail, 11 miles
- Saw 3 elk, a horny toad, small snake
- Beverages and a nap back in camp
- Dinner included corn pone cooked in my Zebra pot oven, cream of broccoli soup, chicken cous cous with apricots and macadamia nuts, and a bit of Fireball by the fire
- Built a fire on the section of fatwood stump planned for the previous night. It had sat out in the rain and on wet ground since yesterday. Lit it up at 7 in the evening and it was still burning at 7 the next morning. All fires this trip were started using a fire steel.
- Only night with no rain

Day 4
- Watched the squirrel that lived right in my camp cut and store cones. He began each morning cutting cones from about 50 feet up at an average rate of 3 per minute. Thus my alarm clock was “thump”, 20 seconds, “thump”, 20 seconds, …… After an hour of that, he began collecting and storing his bounty. Never once did he quit running between the cones and his winter storage area until he was done.
- Breakfast and then broke down and packed up camp
- Hiked the Colonel DevinTrail, which descends over 1200’ off the Rim. Off course then I had to hike back up to the Jeep. Began to rain again as I got close to the top of the hike.

Overall a great trip and learning experience in a beautiful area.

Video of the camp: https://www.youtube.co...
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Isolated
_____________________
All you have is your fire...
And the place you need to reach
4 archives
average hiking speed 1.61 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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