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Humphreys B-24 Bomber Crash Site, AZ
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451 77 0 0 official
Description 77 Triplogs  4 Topics
RatedFavorite   Wish List Region
 
0
0
 Flagstaff - Northwest
Statistics
Difficulty 3.5    Route Finding
Distance Round Trip 7.2 miles
Trailhead Elevation 9,320 feet
Elevation Gain 2,076 feet
Accumulated Gain 2,147 feet
Avg Time Round Trip 4 hours
Kokopelli Seeds 17.94
Interest Off Trail Hiking
Author MtnGeek
Descriptions 9
Routes 0
Photos 118
Trips 72 map ( 489 miles )
Age 38
Location Denver, CO
Photos
Rated Viewed All Mine Friends
7  2014-06-07 AZ_Step
11  2014-02-17 Patrick L
22  2013-09-29
Humphrey's Peak & B24 Cra
BiFrost
11  2013-09-29
Humphrey's Peak & B24 Cra
slowandsteady
36  2013-09-14
Humphreys Summit Trail #1
azwildguide
11  2013-09-13 Buku Hoodoo
9  2013-05-02
Humphreys Summit Trail #1
Hippy
3  2013-03-02
Humphreys Summit via Dutc
toddak
14  2012-06-29
Fremont & Doyle Peaks
Tortoise Hiker
9  2012-06-29
Humphreys Summit Trail #1
BobP
13  2012-06-28 BobP
32  2012-01-02
Humphreys Summit via Dutc
Vaporman
Page 1,  2,  3,  4
Trailhead Forecast
Historical Weather
Radar
Forest Coconino
Wilderness Kachina Peaks
Backpack - No
Seasons - Spring to Autumn
Dogs not allowed
Official Route
 
Alternative Routes
 
Water
Nearby Hikes Area Water Sources
direct air miles away to trailhead
0.0  Aspen Nature Loop
0.0  Humphreys Summit Trail #151
0.0  Humphreys Summit via Dutchman Glade
0.0  Philomena Spring using Humphrey Summit Trail
0.1  Snowbowl
0.1  Agassiz Peak
[ View More! ]
Culture
     Aircraft
     Airplane Wreckage
     Historical Photograph
     Inscriptions
     Memorial
Space
Fauna
     Police Car Moth
Space
Flora
     Baneberry*
     Bluebonnet Lupine
   Mountain Red Elderberry
     Parry's Primrose
     Silverstem Lupine
     Yellow Columbine
Space
an impressive crash site
by MtnGeek
In the early morning hours of September 15, 1944, a U.S. Army Air Force B-24 Bomber on a night training mission crashed into the San Francisco Peaks, killing all eight crewmen. This memorial is dedicated to those young American Airmen.

The Bomber still sits on the slopes of Humphreys Peak. From the Humphreys Trail Parking lot if you look up the mountain you will see a rock flow and just above that, there is a small rocky clearing in the trees at about 11,000 feet. This is where they crashed, right in this clearing. From the Parking lot you can look up there and see the sun glimmering off of the pieces of the plane.

Many have sought out this wreckage and have failed to find it. Looking for it is almost like finding a pin in a haystack, but it's not impossible to find. Here is a description to find it, but you must keep your eyes open, as with directions it's still hard to find. To find it, take the Humphreys trail about 7 switchbacks up. Once you get to the rock field cross over it and take it till it ends. From here it's not real clear how to find it. You want to keep heading up the mountain while heading north. If you go to far north, not north enough or angle too steep you will miss it. Keep your eyes open for the propellers of the plane. Once you find pieces of it head straight up and you will enter a clearing in the trees and there it is. This site is breathtaking seeing how the plane tumbled up the mountain. It created gashes in the mountain changing the landscape of the mountainside.
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    Directions
    Map Drive
    Water None
    Sun5:58am - 6:55pm
    Preferred Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep → 8 AM
    RoadPaved - Car Okay
    Permit $$
    None

    Directions To Humphries Trailhead
    From Flagstaff follow Highway 180 West 7 miles to FR516. Turn right onto FR516 (N. Snowbowl Dr) and follow 6.2 miles to the first large signed parking lot on the left.

    From PHX (I-10 & AZ-51) 164 mi - about 2 hours 41 mins
    From TUC (Jct 1-10 & Grant) 269 mi - about 4 hours 9 mins
    From FLG (Jct I-17 & I-40) 16.0 mi - about 31 mins
    WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.
    How To Put Out a Campfire
    A campfire must be extinguished by drowning it with water, stirring with a shovel, and repeating that process until the campfire is cold to the touch. A campfire is still a danger if it has any trace of heat, and must not be left or abandoned. Wildfires can begin by abandoned campfires that rebuild heat on windy days and then blowing embers ignite surrounding grasses and brush.
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