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Thunder Mountain Monument, NV

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51 2 0
Guide 2 Triplogs  0 Topics
Rated  Favorite Wish List NV > Reno
Rated
2
2 of 5 by 1
 
0
HAZ reminds you to respect the ruins. Please read the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 & Ruins Etiquette
Statistics
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Difficulty 0.5 of 5
Route Finding 1 of 5
Distance Multi-Loop 1.39 miles
Trailhead Elevation 4,600 feet
Elevation Gain 25 feet
Avg Time Round Trip 1 Hour
Kokopelli Seeds 1.52
Interest Ruins & Historic
Backpack No
Dogs not allowed
feature photo
Photos Viewed All Mine Following
51  2008-05-27 AZLOT69
Historical Weather
Trailhead Forecast
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Preferred   Oct, May, Apr, Sep → 9 AM
Seasons   Late Spring to Early Autumn
Sun  6:40am - 4:34pm
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Route Scout App
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Official Route
 
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Water
Nearby Area Water
Star Peak Trail
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Humboldt River Nature Trail
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Rye Patch Reservoir
Rye Patch Reservoir
16.2 mi away
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Water Canyon Trail
29.9 mi away
8.1 mi
Lovelock Cave
Lovelock Cave
53.1 mi away
1.0 mi
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Falls Canyon Trail
61.4 mi away
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Emigrant Trail-Double Wells
Emigrant Trail-Double Wells
63.0 mi away
2.0 mi
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Horse Canyon Trail
63.2 mi away
3.8 mi
McConnell Creek Trail
65.1 mi away
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Rebel Creek Trail
68.9 mi away
10.8 mi
[ View More! ]
One Tin Soldier
by AZLOT69

A road trip across Nevada is a lonely experience. If you are simply trying to get from point A to point B, take an airplane. The adventurous will find a certain beauty in vast valleys and spectacular mountain ranges that continue in an endless repetition, begging for exploration. No sign of civilization, no services, miles and miles of nothing, not even a service station. Traveling along interstate 80, when you are just about to fall asleep, something will catch your eye. You will do a double take and the curious will take the next exit. Nestled along the highway are several unidentified, odd looking structures that at first sight could be part of an abandoned theme park of some sort.


You are in Imlay, Nevada, a small mining community with no facilities. After taking a frontage road off the highway, a sign greets you, Thunder Mountain Indian Monument, Historical Site, State of Nevada, Preservation Project. While curious, a thought goes through your head, I remember all the tourist rip offs while taking family vacations through South Dakota or Nebraska and even Arizona... how much ? Free, yes its free, of course there is a donation box but no caretaker, it's the honor system.

Born Frank Van Zant, this artist was born in Oklahoma and was at least in part a Creek Indian. He served in World War 2 and suffered extensive burns in a tank battle. He held a variety of odd jobs after the war years and ended up in Nevada according to some while on his own road trip. His car broke down at this location and a local made him an offer on some real estate that he could not resist. Having not much for resources he began gathering other peoples castaways and used it for building materials. As time went by he started to express himself through his building. As you hike the grounds you will see he went through different periods. One area shows his being a staunch patriot offering honor to all who served in the armed forces and specifically naming commanding officers and pals. He has a monument to the U.S. Forest Service. As you further explore several anti American phrases start to appear and it becomes clear that he was upset that government was so involved with our lives. He then seems to revert back to his Indian roots and rants about how the white man took this land by force away from the original inhabitants. At this point I observed a panel where the phrase, One Tin Soldier Rode Away, is written. I recognize this phrase from a song sung by Joan Baez about mans greed and the need for peace. In 1969 Frank Van Zant legally changed his name to Chief Rolling Mountain Thunder. His work spanned from 1967 until he succumbed to his inner demons by committing suicide at this site after stating, his life's work was finished in 1989.

Now inhabited only by the spring Mormon cricket infestation, the place is slowly falling apart. Several of the out buildings have burned and vandalism has been rampant. In 1992 this site was put on Nevada's registry of historic sites and while there is no funding, there is a volunteer group led by the son of Chief Rolling Mountain Thunder, to rebuild and preserve the site.

The hike can be done as a loop and be sure to take in the entire acreage as there are over 200 sculptures spread out on the property. There is no one to interpret the site but take it all in, take lots of photos, and like I did, you can research it more later. There are pick-nick tables but no facilities or water.

AZLOT69
    WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

    Permit $$
    Information is listed below


    Directions
    Map Drive
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    Road
    FR / Dirt Road / Gravel - Car Okay

    To hike
    One hundred thirty miles east of Reno Nevada on interstate 80 exit Imlay. Take the south frontage road east about one mile to the monument. There is a donation box.
    page created by AZLOT69 on May 27 2008 9:18 am
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