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This is likely a great time to hike this trail!  Check out "Prefered" months below, keep in mind this is an estimate.

Raccoon Marsh and Woody Pond Trails, CA

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Rated  Favorite Wish List CA > Central Valley
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Difficulty 1 of 5
Route Finding 1 of 5
Distance Multi-Loop 3 miles
Trailhead Elevation 78 feet
Avg Time Round Trip 2 hours
Interest Perennial Creek
varies or not certain dogs are allowed
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8  2013-05-28 lP14
Associated Areas
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Grasslands Wildlife Management Area USFWS
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Preferred   Mar, Nov, Apr, Feb
Sun  6:42am - 4:53pm
Route
 
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Water
Nearby Area Water
Chester Marsh Trail
5.3 mi away
0.7 mi
5 ft
Kesterson Unit Trail
5.4 mi away
3.4 mi
23 ft
Winton Marsh Trail
8.2 mi away
0.7 mi
5 ft
Sousa Trail
8.5 mi away
1.1 mi
6 ft
Pacheco Pass Road
16.7 mi away
40.6 mi
China Hole and Willow Ridge
35.5 mi away
26.0 mi
4,800 ft
Kelly and Coit Lakes Trail
36.2 mi away
11.6 mi
2,686 ft
Wilson Peak Trail
36.8 mi away
7.4 mi
1,830 ft
China Hole Trail
38.7 mi away
9.8 mi
1,480 ft
Frog Lake and China Hole
38.7 mi away
13.0 mi
3,200 ft
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Fauna Nearby

Likely In-Season!
The Raccoon Marsh and Woody Pond Trails are part of the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge Complex in the San Joaquin Valley. They are the two trails open to the public in the West Bear Creek (north central) part of the refuge. The area is easily accessible from CA-165, just south of the community of Stevenson and the junction with CA-140.


The linked, short trails loop around marshy areas and provide opportunities for plant and animal viewing. You will see and walk through riparian woodlands, seasonal wetlands, and native grasslands.

The trails are wide and straight, and I am assuming are used as access roads for hunters and refuge personnel. Although CA-165 is audible and sometimes very visible from the trail, it's quite scenic and restful.

The refuge is not large, so it is quite doable to see other sectors in one day. If you want to see the Tule elk, head to the visitors center in the southern part of the park, near the town of Los Banos. There are two additional auto tour routes there, along with a handful of other short trails. To the east, off of CA-140, you can access the Kesterson Unit where you can free roam. Maps can be downloaded from the refuge's website or here is the overview.

lP14
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

Permit $$
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Directions
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FR / Dirt Road / Gravel - Car Okay

To hike
The trailhead for both trails is located off the West Bear Creek Auto Tour Route. The entrance is off of CA-165, just a few miles south of the junction with CA-140. There is a left hand turnout lane and the entrance is signed. Take the one-way auto route maybe a mile and a small, signed parking area with restroom facilities will be visible on your right.
page created by lP14 on May 28 2013 2:23 pm
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