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Colonel Devin Trail #290, AZ
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Want a nice little hike up the rim with the pleasant sounds of the gently rolling stream waters next to you, and experience some of Arizona's history along the way? Then this is a trail to add to your list! With spectacular views, tall pines, majestic firs, and even at the right time of year some wild berries, how can you go wrong?


History
This trail is named after Colonel Thomas C. Devin, an Army officer who in 1868 pioneered the route down off the rim. Fort Whipple military personnel led by Col. Devin used a trail in this location on a maneuver to find renegade Apaches. At the north access to this trailhead at Rim Road, there in fact is an historical marker for the Battle of Big Dry Wash, where in 1882 U.S. troops defeated a band of Apaches nearby after attacking some ranches in the vicinity.

Overview
This trail is truly a great gateway hike. On the south end at the Washington Park Trailhead, this trail connects to the Highline Trail #31 and becomes part of the Arizona Trail at this point up to the rim's edge. On the north end at the Forest Road (FR300) Trailhead, there is access to a wealth of trails, including the General Crook Trail, Fred Haught Trail #141 (which has its south trailhead access adjacent to the north end of this trail), the Blue Ridge segment of the Arizona Trail, and many more. This trail also is the only established trail providing access to the historical Railroad Tunnel Trail #390, which terminates at an historic, uncompleted railroad tunnel and powder house remains. Despite the access this trail provides to other trails, I find this trail not to be heavily traveled. In fact on my outing I happened to see no one on the trail or at either trailhead.

Hike
The Col. Devin trail is accessible from trailheads at both its north and south ends. Since most I suspect will use the north access, the description here will begin from this trailhead ( reverse ). At the trailhead sign, on the south side of FR300 (across from the monument commemorating the Battle of Big Dry Wash), the trail begins. Follow the trail as it parallels the power lines to the west.

Trail reconstruction on some of the upper sections has changed some of the route. I suspect that the original trail followed the power lines all the way (as this is a water pipeline and powerline access road), but today the trail "officially" does not follow this road all the way (plus, it provides easier access to the Railroad Tunnel Trail). Deadfall from old fires lies scattered throughout the area; thankfully the forest has been returning and is quite beautiful again.

At the second power pole, don't miss the turn to the left (the trail leads away from the power line). Shortly after descending the rim and making this turn to the left, there is a gate on the trail; please reclose it on the way down! (Note: there is also another similar gate that goes perpendicular to and underneath the power lines. If you come to this gate, then you have just missed the turnoff; look back and to your left and you should be on the right path!)

Soon after passing through the gate, you will come to a small wooden sign noting the turnoff to the Railroad Tunnel Trail #390. There are also some switchbacks in this area. If detouring from this hike to the tunnel, it is another quarter mile of trail back up the rim and terminates at the historic, uncompleted railroad tunnel and powder house remains.

Continuing on past the Railroad Tunnel Trail turnoff, the path winds down, descending past another open-air rock structure before veering to the right and back to the larger path alongside the power lines. (For those coming up from the south, there is a small sign marking this turnoff veer to the right.) Soon, the trail will get much closer to and parallel a part of the East Verde river, as it descends to connect with Ellison Creek. Some of the most colorful and beautiful butterflies I have ever seen were in this south half of the trail, and others have reported at the right times of year to find wild berries (including raspberries, I am told) here as well. There are numerous little rushing waterfalls and rapids (key word "little", most of the time)...nothing big, but enjoyable to view and listen to, too. This part of the trail is less steep.

As you get close to the Washington Park Trailhead, you will encounter one section of the water pipeline that is exposed as it goes over a wash. Just before reaching the trailhead and parking lot, there is a turnoff to the right for those continuing on the Highline portion of the Arizona Trail.

Hikers, horseback riders, and mountain bikers are permitted on this trail, although the latter two are not recommended. This trail is steep with loose footing in several areas.
Description 69 Triplogs  1 Topic
RatedFavorite  
Wish List 10
 Region
 
0
0
 Payson N
Statistics
clicktap icons for details
Difficulty 2.5 of 5
Route Finding 2 of 5
Distance One Way 2 miles
Trailhead Elevation 7,246 feet
Elevation Gain 1,122 feet
Accumulated Gain 1,122 feet
Avg Time One Way 1 hour
Kokopelli Seeds 5.74
Interest Historic & Perennial Creek
Author azdesertfather
Descriptions 12
Routes 58
Photos 1,185
Trips 774 map ( 5,807 miles )
Age 43
Location Tucson, AZ
Photos
Viewed All Mine Following
3  2017-09-04 The_N
27  2017-08-17 rayhuston
6  2017-08-12 ALMAL
12  2017-08-10 Sredfield
8  2017-08-07 mazatzal
15  2017-08-05
Devin Bear Fred Lasso
chumley
14  2017-07-22
AZT26-27-GenSprgCyn-Battle of BigDryWash
The_Eagle
18  2017-07-22
AZT26-27-GenSprgCyn-Battle of BigDryWash
BiFrost
5  2017-06-23 The_N
12  2017-06-11
Devin Tunnel Haught Rim Romp
survivordude
9  2017-06-02
Cabin Loop - Mogollon Rim
The_N
25  2017-05-08 Sredfield
Page 1,  2,  3,  4
Historical Weather
Trailhead Forecast
Radar
Forest Tonto
Backpack   Yes & Connecting
Preferred   Apr, May, Sep, Oct → 8 AM
Seasons   Spring to Autumn
Sun  6:12am - 6:25pm
Route Scout
import queue
Official Route
 
Alternative Routes
 
Water
Nearby Area Water
Pump Station Trail #296
0.9 mi away
0.8 mi
240 ft
Railroad Tunnel Trail #390
1.5 mi away
1.0 mi
490 ft
Crackerbox Canyon
1.5 mi away
10.2 mi
681 ft
Blue Ridge - AZT #27
1.7 mi away
15.4 mi
Camp Grasshopper - Mogollon Rim-C/Site#4
1.8 mi away
13.5 mi
Mogollon Rim Viewpoints Loop - via 300D-300L
1.8 mi away
2.8 mi
270 ft
[ View More! ]
Fauna
Arizona Black Rattlesnake
Arizona Sister Butterfly
Atlantis Fritillary Butterfly
Bramble Hairstreak
Brush Deermouse
Canyonland Satyr
Checkered White Butterfly
Common Buckeye Butterfly
Dainty sulphur
Golden-banded Skipper
Gopher Snake
Horned Lizard
Mexican yellow
Mylitta Crescent
Nais Metalmark
Northern cloudywing
Orange Sulphur
Pipevine Swallowtail Butterfly
Queen Alexandra's Sulphur Butterfly
Reakirt's Blue Butterfly
Red-spotted Purple Butterfly
Silver-spotted Skipper
Spring Azure Butterfly
Terrestrial Gartersnake
Thicket Hairstreak Butterfly
Two-tailed Swallowtail Butterfly
Variegated Fritillary Butterfly
Weidemeyer's Admiral Butterfly
Western tailed blue
Western Tanager
Zeres metalmark
Flora
Arizona Blackberry
Netleaf Hackberry
Scarlet Bugler
White Watercress
Woolly Paintbrush
Meteorology
Sunset
Named place
East Verde River
East Verde River - Source
East Verde River @ Highline
Fred Haught Spring
General Springs
Mail Creek
Mogollon Rim
Quien Sabe Spring
Culture
Camp-fire
Campsite
Dude Fire
Graffiti
HAZ Food
Historical Marker
Informational/Interpretive Trail Sign
Intrepid Back Shot
Railroad Right-of-Way
Snoozing Home
Stone Dwelling
Trail Maintenance
Trail Signs and Markings
Wooden Dwelling
Great Gateway Hike with History Thrown In!
by azdesertfather

Want a nice little hike up the rim with the pleasant sounds of the gently rolling stream waters next to you, and experience some of Arizona's history along the way? Then this is a trail to add to your list! With spectacular views, tall pines, majestic firs, and even at the right time of year some wild berries, how can you go wrong?


History
This trail is named after Colonel Thomas C. Devin, an Army officer who in 1868 pioneered the route down off the rim. Fort Whipple military personnel led by Col. Devin used a trail in this location on a maneuver to find renegade Apaches. At the north access to this trailhead at Rim Road, there in fact is an historical marker for the Battle of Big Dry Wash, where in 1882 U.S. troops defeated a band of Apaches nearby after attacking some ranches in the vicinity.

Overview
This trail is truly a great gateway hike. On the south end at the Washington Park Trailhead, this trail connects to the Highline Trail #31 and becomes part of the Arizona Trail at this point up to the rim's edge. On the north end at the Forest Road (FR300) Trailhead, there is access to a wealth of trails, including the General Crook Trail, Fred Haught Trail #141 (which has its south trailhead access adjacent to the north end of this trail), the Blue Ridge segment of the Arizona Trail, and many more. This trail also is the only established trail providing access to the historical Railroad Tunnel Trail #390, which terminates at an historic, uncompleted railroad tunnel and powder house remains. Despite the access this trail provides to other trails, I find this trail not to be heavily traveled. In fact on my outing I happened to see no one on the trail or at either trailhead.

Hike
The Col. Devin trail is accessible from trailheads at both its north and south ends. Since most I suspect will use the north access, the description here will begin from this trailhead ( reverse ). At the trailhead sign, on the south side of FR300 (across from the monument commemorating the Battle of Big Dry Wash), the trail begins. Follow the trail as it parallels the power lines to the west.

Trail reconstruction on some of the upper sections has changed some of the route. I suspect that the original trail followed the power lines all the way (as this is a water pipeline and powerline access road), but today the trail "officially" does not follow this road all the way (plus, it provides easier access to the Railroad Tunnel Trail). Deadfall from old fires lies scattered throughout the area; thankfully the forest has been returning and is quite beautiful again.

At the second power pole, don't miss the turn to the left (the trail leads away from the power line). Shortly after descending the rim and making this turn to the left, there is a gate on the trail; please reclose it on the way down! (Note: there is also another similar gate that goes perpendicular to and underneath the power lines. If you come to this gate, then you have just missed the turnoff; look back and to your left and you should be on the right path!)

Soon after passing through the gate, you will come to a small wooden sign noting the turnoff to the Railroad Tunnel Trail #390. There are also some switchbacks in this area. If detouring from this hike to the tunnel, it is another quarter mile of trail back up the rim and terminates at the historic, uncompleted railroad tunnel and powder house remains.

Continuing on past the Railroad Tunnel Trail turnoff, the path winds down, descending past another open-air rock structure before veering to the right and back to the larger path alongside the power lines. (For those coming up from the south, there is a small sign marking this turnoff veer to the right.) Soon, the trail will get much closer to and parallel a part of the East Verde river, as it descends to connect with Ellison Creek. Some of the most colorful and beautiful butterflies I have ever seen were in this south half of the trail, and others have reported at the right times of year to find wild berries (including raspberries, I am told) here as well. There are numerous little rushing waterfalls and rapids (key word "little", most of the time)...nothing big, but enjoyable to view and listen to, too. This part of the trail is less steep.

As you get close to the Washington Park Trailhead, you will encounter one section of the water pipeline that is exposed as it goes over a wash. Just before reaching the trailhead and parking lot, there is a turnoff to the right for those continuing on the Highline portion of the Arizona Trail.

Hikers, horseback riders, and mountain bikers are permitted on this trail, although the latter two are not recommended. This trail is steep with loose footing in several areas.
© 2008 - 2017 hikearizona.com

Gate Policy: If a gate is closed upon arrival, leave it closed after you go through. If it is open, leave it open. Leaving a closed gate open may put cattle in danger. Closing an open gate may cut them off from water. Please be respectful, leave gates as found.

-

One-Way Notice: This hike is listed as One-Way. When you hike several trails on a single "hike", log it with a generic name that describes the hike. Then link the trails traveled, check out the example.
WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

Permit $$
None


Directions
Map Drive
or
Road
FR / Jeep Road - Car possible when dry

To hike
From FR300 (Rim Road) TH (north access): From Payson follow AZ87 north past Pine and Strawberry to the Rim Road (FR300). Turn right onto FR300 and follow 12 miles. Just past mile post 12 is the monument for the Battle of Big Dry Wash. No designated parking area, but you can park alongside the road next to the trailhead.

From Washington Park TH (south access): Washington Park Trailhead is reached by taking AZ87 to FR199 (Houston Mesa Road, just north of the roundabout north of town). Turn east on FR199 and travel 10.3 miles to FR64. Turn west on FR64 and travel 0.7 mile to FR32. Turn north on FR32 and 3.3 miles to FR32A. The trailhead is located 0.5 mile north of FR32A. (Once you get into the Whispering Pines area at the north end of FR199, you will see the signs leading to the TH.) Upon reaching Washington Park Trailhead, continue past the kiosk approximately 100' to the beginning of Trail #290.
page created by azdesertfather on Oct 03 2008 12:18 pm
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