username
X
password
register help

Forest of Nisene Marks Loop, CA

details
drive
permit
forecast
route
stats
photos
triplog
topics
location
11 1 0
Guide 1 Triplog  0 Topics
Rated  Favorite Wish List CA > Bay Area
Rated
0
0 of 5 by 0
 
0
Statistics
clicktap icons for details
Difficulty 3 of 5
Route Finding 2 of 5
Distance Round Trip 11.4 miles
Trailhead Elevation 245 feet
Elevation Gain 1,456 feet
Accumulated Gain 1,854 feet
Avg Time Round Trip 5-6 Hours
Kokopelli Seeds 20.67
Interest Seasonal Waterfall, Seasonal Creek & Perennial Creek
Backpack Yes
Dogs not allowed
feature photo
Photos Viewed All Mine Following
11  2013-08-17 JimmyLyding
Historical Weather
Trailhead Forecast
Radar
Expand Map
Preferred   Oct, May, Jun, Jul → 6 AM
Seasons   Spring to Autumn
Sun  7:08am - 4:51pm
openimportsetbegin
Route Scout App
19044followactivity
Official Route
 
0 Linked
 
Water
Nearby Area Water
Aptos Creek Trail
0.1 mi away
11.0 mi
Forest of Nisene Marks-Olive Springs TH
3.0 mi away
10.0 mi
2,400 ft
Swanson Creek Nature Trail Loop
Swanson Creek Nature Trail Loop
7.1 mi away
3.0 mi
600 ft
Pogonip Creek Nature Trail
7.5 mi away
1.8 mi
Redwood Grove Trail
8.9 mi away
River and Ridge Loop Trail
8.9 mi away
4.5 mi
Henry Cowell Redwoods Loop
Henry Cowell Redwoods Loop
8.9 mi away
6.3 mi
1,300 ft
Pipeline Road Trail
8.9 mi away
5.9 mi
375 ft
Lime Kilns Trail
10.1 mi away
3.2 mi
Fall Creek Unit of Henry Cowell Redwoods
Fall Creek Unit of Henry Cowell Redwoods
10.1 mi away
8.0 mi
1,800 ft
[ View More! ]
Popular Park For A Good Workout
by JimmyLyding

The Forest of Nisene Marks State Park is 10,000 acres of mainly coast redwood forest with some coastal chaparral. The area was heavily logged for decades before being donated to the state by the Marks family in 1963. The park gets its name from the matriarch of the Marks family. According to the park brochure the Southern Pacific Railroad arrived in Monterey, CA in the 1880s, and financed the logging of Upper Aptos Canyon via the Loma Prieta Lumber Company. Loma Prieta Mill closed in 1924 after processing 140 million board feet of redwood. There is still ample evidence of logging in the form of stumps, old building sites and the railroad that serviced the mill.


This park is quite popular with joggers and mountain bikers in addition to hikers. Many mountain bikers get shuttled to the highest reaches of the park in order to cruise downhill to the main entrance, and these tenderfeet are easily distinguished from the hardier cyclists who actually ride up the mountain.

Hike: The hike starts at the Porter Family Picnic Area in a deep redwood forest. Note that this picnic area can only be reached by auto from late spring to mid-autumn because the Winter Gate closes during the rainy season. Head north along the vestigial dirt road then head uphill on the Loma Prieta Grade Trail just past Margaret's Bridge. This hike has very good signage. This section goes through a relatively open forest with the large tanoaks that characterize logged areas before redwoods begin to reclaim it. You reach a 3-way junction with the Ridge Connection and Big Stump Gap trails after about 2.8 miles and about a thousand feet of AEG. We took Big Stump Gap Trail as it headed steeply uphill to the West Ridge Trail which ends at the West Ridge Trail Camp 4.5 miles and 1,300' higher than the trailhead. Take West Ridge Fire Road from the camp up to Sand Point Overlook (5 miles) which is the high point of the hike. The views here are superb with much of Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay spread out before you. The bench here is a great place for refreshments, but be aware that this is a popular spot. The top of the ridge is covered in coastal chaparral. Indeed one of the interesting things about hiking in the Bay Area is how deep redwood forest seems to instantly transition to 6-feet-high chaparral.

Head downhill on the Aptos Creek Fire Road as it gradually loses 100' over a mile to the Big Slide Trail. You are now in a deep redwood forest. Big Slide descends steeply at times another 500' to put you 7.5 miles from the start at the Aptos Creek Trail. You can head a mile-and-change as Aptos Creek Trail meanders near its namesake to Five Finger Falls. We didn't take this option because the falls are apt to be dry in the early fall. The forest here is genuinely dark with mounds of duff making off-trail travel impossible unless one likes going through mountains of redwood needles and spider webs. Take the Aptos Creek Trail to the right, and enjoy the dark redwood forest as the trail contours down the north side of the creek (with a short, but steep uphill stretch) for 2.25 miles until you hit the Aptos Creek Fire Road. This dirt road is basically the same road that goes from the park entrance to the trailhead at Mary Easton Picnic Area. The forest is a little more open here, and you are able to enjoy the last mile and a half on a relatively level grade.

JimmyLyding
    WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

    Permit $$
    CA State Parks - Fee: typically $2-$15 per vehicle, view more information


    Directions
    Map Drive
    or
    Road
    FR / Dirt Road / Gravel - Car Okay

    To hike
    From US Hwy 1 in Aptos, CA take the State Park Drive exit. Go east on Soquel Drive about 1/2 mile to Aptos Creek Road. Take Aptos Creek about 2 miles as it turns to dirt soon after entering the park. You are in suburban Santa Cruz, and everything is well-signed.
    page created by JimmyLyding on Oct 20 2013 1:37 pm
    help comment issue

    end of page marker