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Packard Trail #66, AZPrint Full | Basic
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Description 25 Triplogs 0 Topics
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 Perkinsville - North
HAZ reminds you to respect the ruins. Please read the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 & Ruins Etiquette
Statistics
Difficulty 3.5    Route Finding
Distance One Way 5.8 miles
Trailhead Elevation 3,566 feet
Elevation Gain 1,211 feet
Accumulated Gain 1,526 feet
Avg Time One Way 3.5 hours
Kokopelli Seeds 10.89
Interest Ruins
Author GTG_AZH
Descriptions 1
Routes 0
Photos 381
Trips 7 map ( 21 miles )
Age 46
Location Peoria, AZ - Originally from Roc
Photos
Rated Viewed All Mine Friends
8  2013-04-26
Henderson Trail #53
Oregon Hiker
10  2013-04-21
Packard Parsons Loop
JuanJaimeiii
4  2013-04-21 johnlp
15  2012-04-28 cabel
25  2012-04-21
Packard Parsons Loop
The Eagle
11  2011-11-16 Oregon Hiker
7  2010-04-04 hhwolf14
19  2009-05-09 topohiker
5  2007-01-08 ADIE
5  2005-07-30 Abe
15  2002-11-18 GTG_AZH
28  2001-12-10 GTG_AZH
Trailhead Forecast
Historical Weather
Radar
Map - Beartooth Sedona
Forest Coconino
Wilderness Sycamore Canyon
Backpack - Possible & Connecting
Seasons - Spring to Autumn
Official Route
 
Alternative Routes
 
Water
Nearby Hikes Area Water Sources
direct air miles away to trailhead
0.0  Parsons Trail #144
3.9  Pasture Tank Trail #9901
4.2  Railroad Draw Trail #68
4.3  Sycamore Basin Trail #63
5.8  Dogie Trail #116
5.8  Taylor Cabin via Dogie Trail - Sycamore Cany
[ View More! ]
Culture
     Sinagua Dwelling
 Unidentified Culture
Space
Fauna
     Gopher Snake
Space
Flora
     Sego Lily (aka Mariposa Lily)
     Strawberry Hedgehog
Space

Long walk across the mesa
by GTG_AZH

Mobile Version

Packard Trail to Sycamore Tank out and back. This is a description of the hike to Sycamore Tank and back along with a description of circling behind the tank back down into Sycamore Canyon. This trail has no drinkable water so bring your own.

This hike starts at the Sycamore Canyon trailhead. Take the left at the trail junction at the bottom of the hill. "The left option crosses the creek and heads up for a long venture over Packard Mesa." Sycamore Canyon calls with its water and beauty, but you have a climb ahead of you friend. My pictures were taken in late September and late November thus explaining the different foliage colors and inconsistencies.

At the intersection of Parsons Trail (144) and Packard Trail (66) hang a left and go west across the boulders. Getting across the creek during low water is fairly easy. Sycamore Creek makes a big pool here so cross at the spillway, you will see the cairns. Once across the creek head north along the barbed wire fence until you come to a pass-through in the fence. This section of the trail is fairly brushy for a bit so you may want long pants or gaiters for this. Go ahead and on up to the top of the mountain, to Packard Mesa. The trail doubles back towards the parking-lot and then takes off for two miles up the mountain. This climb is great, I compare it to one and a half to two Squaw Peak ascents with no concrete trail. The trail goes up and up for a while until it finally flattens out on Packard Mesa. Hiking across the mesa gives some great views east into Prescott Forrest, upper Sycamore Canyon and if you look close enough you can see the San Francisco Peaks.

From what I can surmise, Packard Ranch would use this trail to move their cattle up to graze and so forth up on the mesa, letting the cattle roam further north into higher, cooler ground. The Packard Trail follows a cow path for 3 miles or so across the mesa headed north. The trail meanders back and forth between juniper, pinon pine and low growing prickly pear. The trail can become confusing at times as the worn paths are from meandering cows that don't always go the same way. Just keep an eye out for the cowboy sized cairns. I suppose these large cairns were made by cowboys to be easier to spot in a moving herd. I can only guess that the prickly pear grow so low because of the wind they get up here. If you have time, bring a kite, I guarantee it will fly. This area also seem like it would be very cold in winter months as well due to the exposure you get up there.

Continue north across the mesa to Sycamore Tank, which is basically a cow pond. I would not recommend drinking the water here at all due to the cattle fouling it. You will know you're at the tank when you see the gate. When the tank is low you can take a break under the big cottonwood. It's one of the nicer specimens that I have ever seen. It must do well because of the water and fertilizer it gets. Out the back gate around the east side of the tank is a corral and a couple of metal storage boxes. Sycamore Tank makes a good turn-around spot. Return the way you came in for a 10-mile roundtrip day hike.

If you are adventurous and wish to explore the steep canyon going back down into Sycamore Creek then read on.

Warning! This portion of the hike can be dangerous due to the ruggedness of the canyon. This is also a major drainage from Packard Mesa down into Sycamore Creek. Do not enter the wash or the canyon if you suspect the slightest hint of rain. There are boulders that have been pushed around by some pretty strong water in here.

The canyon starts as a gentle wash, quickly becoming a canyon with steep walls. At about a mile from Sycamore Tank down into the canyon you encounter your first drop-off. It's about a 70 foot high cliff that you must skirt around the edge of down to the bottom. This thing is huge. I took the east side down. Continuing on down the canyon you will encounter many more cliffs like this. Some you can boulder down to the bottom, others I had to go high to the side to make it down. I was solo on this one so things were a little scary with the cliffs sometimes. You will encounter numerous pools and small caves along the way.

Plan your time accordingly. I got to within a few hundred yards of Sycamore Creek and couldn't go any further. All that far and no donut! I could even see Parsons Trail! You may be able to complete the loop I was trying to complete the loop and return via Parsons Trail. I believe the loop can be done and I will complete it someday. On this day I couldn't find a way past this set of pools. I underestimated my time and wanted to be out of the canyon by dark so I had to bushwhack up to the top of the west side of the canyon. There is a break in the cliffs at the top and I was able to get to it and make it out of canyon in an hour or less. Then I hiked cross-country until I ran across Packard Trail and headed back. From the beginning of the wash to my turn around point with one small break took 2.25 hours. It took me 45 - 50 minutes to climb out of the canyon through the brush straight up. You can see my reference points on my map.

1. Entered wash into canyon.
2. Encountered first cliffs.
3. Turned around.
4. Exited canyon.
5. Hiked cross-country.
6. Returned on Packard Trail.


Gate Policy: If a gate is closed upon arrival, leave it closed after you go through. If it is open, leave it open. Leaving a closed gate open may put cattle in danger. Closing an open gate may cut them off from water. Please be respectful, leave gates as found.

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Coconino FS Reports This trail serves mainly as access to other Sycamore Canyon Wilderness trails. It also provides access to this area from the Cottonwood-Clarkdale area. This is strictly a recreational trail and is used by both hikers and horseback riders.

Maps, other resources: Prescott National Forest, east half; U.S.G.S. topographic 7.5' quad for Clarkdale and Sycamore Basin.

Trail layout: The trail climbs immediately from Sycamore Creek to Packard Mesa to an elevation of about 4,800 ft. This is the only moderately difficult portion of the trail. The trail then stays on the mesa to where it intersects TR #63. Riders continuing north on TR #63 will find water for horses at Sycamore Tank, just 0.5 miles north of the trail junction. The Sycamore Canyon Wilderness trailhead for TR #63 lies another 0.5 miles north of the tank.

Precautions: There is no drinking water along this trail.
One-Way Notice: This hike is listed as One-Way. When you hike several trails on a single "hike", log it with a generic name that describes the hike. Then link the trails traveled, check out the example.

Directions Preferred Months Mar Apr Sep Oct
Water / Source:None
Preferred Start8 AM Cell Phone Signal??? Sunrise7:32am Sunset5:21pm
Road / VehicleFR / Dirt Road / Gravel - Car Okay
Fees / Permit
None

Directions
Print Version
To hike
From I-17 take 260 west out of Camp Verde and head on over to Cottonwood. Turn left onto 89A and follow through Old Town Cottonwood on the slow 25mph Main St. Continue on to the Tuzigoot National Monument turn off going right. Soon after turning you cross a good size bridge. Take the first left after the bridge onto Sycamore Canyon Road. After 1.4 miles the pavement ends and your rolling across a washboard hard packed dirt road. At 4.6 miles you cross the Coconino National Forest boundary. The sign at the boundary reads 6 miles to Sycamore Canyon. (It's really only 5.6 miles more as the trailhead is just before the road the dips into the canyon.) From here on the road is called FS 131 not that it really matters. The road is smooth hard packed dirt. There is one creek crossing at about 8.1 miles but nothing to even get worried about. Keep your eyes open for horse grazing in the canyon below. After the 9 mile mark the road gets rougher to the trailhead. The total distance from the turn after bridge is about 10.2 miles.

Access and trailhead location: From Clarkdale take the road to Tutzigoot Monument. After crossing the Verde River bridge turn left immediately on the road that parallels the river. This becomes FR 131. Take this road for approximately 10 miles to the Sycamore Canyon overlook and the Sycamore Canyon Wilderness boundary just east of the Packard Ranch.

Travel time: Approximately 20 min. from Clarkdale. Road condition: Paved, then graded dirt
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.
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