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San Pedro House Trails, AZ

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Guide 8 Triplogs  0 Topics
Rated  Favorite Wish List AZ > Tucson > Sierra Vista
Rated
5
5 of 5 by 2
 
2
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Distance One Way 30 miles
Trailhead Elevation 4,056 feet
varies or not certain dogs are allowed
editedit > ops > dogs to adjust
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Photos Viewed All Mine Following
23  2016-05-03
San Pedro Trail
topohiker
13  2012-04-26 MAVM
5  2011-02-11 Slider
Author HAZ_Hikebot
author avatar Guides 16,882
Routes 16,052
Photos 24
Trips 1 map ( 6 miles )
Age 22 Male Gender
Location TrailDEX, HAZ
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Preferred   Mar, Nov, Feb, Apr
Seasons   Autumn to Spring
Sun  6:08am - 6:19pm
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The San Pedro Trail is a long distance trail that parallels the river though most of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area. When completed, it will be approximately 30 miles long. Two trail sections can be accessed from the San Pedro House:

  • San Rafael del Valle section begins just south of the San Pedro House and heads south to Hereford Road (8 miles).
  • Clanton section begins just north of Hwy 90. It goes north, past the ruins of the Clanton Ranch (3 miles) to Escapule Rd, (3.6 miles).

Interpretive Loop

Begin at the San Pedro House and follow the interpretive loop signs to the river and back.

  • San Pedro House a historic ranch house restored by the Friends of the San Pedro River is a bookstore and gift shop run by volunteers.
  • The Big Cottonwood Tree (west of the house) is not as old as you might think. Cottonwoods grow very quickly in favorable conditions. This one is estimated to be between 90 and 130 years old. The cottonwood behind the house was planted in 1956.
  • Abandoned agricultural fields dominate the landscape here. They were once used for growing alfalfa and other feed for cattle. Native vegetation is steadily returning as can be seen along the Del Valle Trail.
  • The Riparian Forest, one of the most endangered forest types in the world, is a stark contrast to the adjacent fields. The cottonwood and willow trees provide essential habitat for a variety of wildlife, including over 350 species of birds. The trees and other riparian vegetation also promote soil deposition, which overtime, will refill the incised channel.
  • Linear Pools often form along rivers providing excellent habitat for turtles, frogs and fish. They are created by a wash coming into the river, thick vegetative growth or changes in underground geology.
  • Kingfisher Pond was created years ago when this area was a sand and gravel quarry. The large hole created by the operation eventually filled up with ground and flood water. There are no surface inlets or outlets. Green Kingfishers are often seen along its edge.
  • Oxbows are semi-circles of trees created when the river was in a different channel. Young Cottonwoods sprout only in very wet conditions. Oxbows show us where the river once flowed.



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2018-07-14 HAZ_Hikebot

    One-Way Notice
    This hike is listed as One-Way.

    When hiking several trails on a single "hike", log it with a generic name that describes the hike. Then link the trails traveled, check out the example.
    WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

    Most recent Triplog Reviews
    San Pedro House Trails
    rated 5rated 5rated 5rated 5rated 5
    San Pedro RNCA - Murray Springs TH

    Once again, I engaged the San Pedro RNCA via the Murray Springs TH and made way towards the Hereford Bridge TH to the south. Running my urban wheel-set on a ride that was entirely trails (mostly single track) - mixed with extended hiking (4 miles) - that would prove to be an effective bike-hiking type of workout.

    The weather, hazy sun then overcast with light to moderate winds throughout...a bit of a capricious headwind, had little effect on the upgrade ride to the south. The San Pedro RNCA being a menagerie of surfaces with extended heavy-sand in places throughout - was even more erroded here and there than earlier in the month - lots of soft top dirt that was more firmly compacted last time - plenty of resistance throughout! I was pleased with the overall performance, both hiking / riding split at about 15/85% - got one flat tire coming into the half-way point, and took time-out to perform a protracted 30' repair followed by a 30' afternoon nap :zzz: on the new picnic tables at the the Hereford Bridge TH - Good times & training! ;)
    San Pedro House Trails
    rated 5rated 5rated 5rated 5rated 5
    Spent the afternoon doing future routing R&D about the upper San Pedro River, which is muddy in bank throughout one might say - flowing briskly at near flood levels. After a few weeks of not getting out due to many conflicting issues - I finally took a little walk in the aftermath of the daily afternoon rain here in Sierra Vista. The riverside trails south of the San Pedro House were just the right balm after a stormy July of transformation...
    San Pedro House Trails
    rated 5rated 5rated 5rated 5rated 5
    As the wind was beating the house relentlessly all morning - with gust near gale force at times - I chose to make this afternoons outing a trip down to the riverside. Especially nice, as the trailhead is but 8 miles from home. I had no intention of staying on the San Pedro Trail exclusively or merely hiking a section to log - not today - I wanted to bushwack and cross the river a few times...then stretch-it-out a bit on what seems like a flat hike after recent elevations. From the San Pedro River Valley, I could get perspective on the Huachuca Mountain Range and reflect on a few of the hikes from weeks passed. Further I could ponder the hikes and peak bagging yet to come this season in the home range. The GPS tells the tale of a meandering reconoiter that makes me feel fortunate to live in Baja Arizona these days! Avg. Grade 27.3%

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