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Desert Tortoise
Desert Tortoise152 locationsReptile/Amphibian
.: Timknorr :.
Jul 16 2014
Gateway Loop Trail - MSP
Featured Detail Photo mini map Featured Full Photo.: rwstorm :.
Jul 17 2012
California Gulch
ID453  URL
TypeReptile/Amphibian
FamilyTestudinidae - Tortoises
Images Bing, Google

Gopherus morafkai

Description
"This tortoise may attain a length of 10 to 14 inches (25 to 36 cm), with males being slightly larger than females. Male tortoises have a longer gular horn than females, their plastron (lower shell) is concave compared to female tortoises. Their shells are high-domed, and greenish-tan to dark brown in color. Desert tortoises can grow from 4-6" in height and weigh 8-15 lb (4-7 kg) when fully grown. The front limbs have heavy, claw-like scales and are flattened for digging. Back legs are more stumpy and elephantine" Source Wikipedia
Comments
"The tortoise is able to live where ground temperature may exceed 140 degrees Fahrenheit (60 degrees Celsius) because of its ability to dig underground burrows and escape the heat. At least 95% of its life is spent in burrows. There, it is also protected from freezing winter weather while dormant, from November through February or March. With its burrow, this tortoise creates a subterranean environment that can be beneficial to other reptiles, mammals, birds and invertebrates.

Scientists have divided the desert tortoise into two types: the Mojave and Sonoran Desert tortoises, with a possible third type in the Black Mountains of northwestern Arizona. They live in a different type of habitat, from sandy flats to rocky foothills. They have a strong proclivity in the Mojave desert for alluvial fans, washes and canyons where more suitable soils for den construction might be found. They range from near sea level to around 3,500 feet in elevation. It is believed that, in their entire lives, these tortoises rarely move more than two miles from their natal nest. They also live to be 80-100 years old."

"Desert tortoise populations in some areas have declined by as much as 90% since the 1980s and the Mojave population is listed as threatened. It is unlawful to touch, harm, harass or collect wild desert tortoises. It is, however, possible to adopt captive tortoises through the Tortoise Adoption Program (TAP) in Arizona, or through the Bureau of Land Management in Nevada. When adopted in Nevada, they will have a computer chip embedded on their back for reference. According to Arizona Game and Fish Commission Rule R12-4-407 A.1, they may be possessed if the tortoises are obtained from a captive source which is properly documented. Commission Order 43: Reptile Notes 3: one tortoise per family member."

Source
Wikipedia
All Months
298 Photos
Jan
7
Feb
13
Mar
47
Apr
33
May
10
Jun
3
Jul
28
Aug
63
Sep
44
Oct
35
Nov
10
Dec
5
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