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Grizzly Bear
Grizzly Bear11 locationsMammal
.: gummo :.
Jun 16 2011
Grinnell Glacier-High Lake Viewpoin
Featured Detail Photo mini map Featured Full Photo.: gummo :.
Jun 20 2011
Apikuni Falls
ID703  URL
TypeMammal
FamilyUrsidae - Bears
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Ursus arctos horribilis

Appearance
Grizzly claws are longer than an American black bear's and adapted for digging
Most adult female grizzlies weigh 290–400 lb, while adult males weigh on average 400–790 lb. The average total length in this subspecies is 6.50 ft, with an average shoulder height of 3.35 ft and hindfoot length of 11 in. Newborn bears may weigh less than 1.1 lb(wow). In the Yukon River area, mature female grizzlies can weigh as little as 220 lb. For a female, these average weights would be 300 lb inland and 500 lb coastal, respectively. One study found that the average weight for an inland male grizzly was around 600 pounds, and the average weight for a coastal male was around 899 lb.

Although variable in color from blond to nearly black, grizzly bear fur is typically brown with darker legs and commonly white or blond tipped fur on the flank and back.

Characteristics
A pronounced muscular hump appears on adult grizzlies' shoulders; black bears do not have this hump.
Aside from the distinguishing hump, a grizzly bear can be identified by a "dished in" profile of their face with short, rounded ears, whereas a black bear has a straight face profile and longer ears.
A grizzly bear can also be identified by its rump, which is lower than its shoulders; a black bear's rump is higher than its shoulders.
A grizzly bear's front claws measure about 2–4 inches in length; a black bear's claws measure about 1–2 inches in length.

General
The grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis), also known as the North American brown bear or simply grizzly, is a population or subspecies of the brown bear inhabiting North America.

In addition to the mainland grizzly (Ursus arctos horribilis), other morphological forms of brown bear in North America are sometimes identified as grizzly bears. These include two living populations — the Kodiak bear (U. a. middendorffi) and the peninsular grizzly (U. a. gyas) — as well as the extinct California grizzly (U. a. californicus†), Mexican grizzly (formerly U. a. nelsoni†), and Ungava-Labrador grizzly (formerly U. a. ungavaesis†). On average, grizzly bears near the coast tend to be larger while inland grizzlies tend to be smaller.

The Ussuri brown bear (U. a. lasiotus), inhabiting Russia, Northern China, Japan, and Korea, is sometimes referred to as the "black grizzly", although it is no more closely related to North American brown bears than other subspecies of brown bear around the world.

Grizzly
Meriwether Lewis and William Clark first described it as grisley, which could be interpreted as either "grizzly" (i.e., "grizzled"—that is, with grey-tipped hair) or "grisly" ("fear-inspiring", now usually "gruesome"). The modern spelling supposes the former meaning; even so, naturalist George Ord formally classified it in 1815 as U. horribilis for its character.

Source
Wikipedia
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