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3 triplogs

Feb 23 2007
Ben
avatar

 Guides 2
 Photos 20
 Triplogs 3

77 male
 Joined Dec 27 2004
 Glendale, AZ
Double-Barrel ArchNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 23 2007
Ben
Hiking2.75 Miles 100 AEG
Hiking2.75 Miles
100 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
On February 13, 2007, two of us used HikeArizona information to go to Double Barreled Arch. We parked at the site and walked north to the interesting formation. Earlier, I had been to this arch from the north. That path involves a .8 of a mile each way along a fence. About 1.5 miles north of the 1100 exit from 1065, by the corral, is the major access to the top of the Paria Plateau. About one mile to the east of 1065 (House Rock Valley Road) you cross a cattle guard at a fence line. Park as far south on the fence line road as your vehicle allows. Then walk south, crossing the fence to the west when convenient, and continue to this arch which is named House Rock Valley Arch by the National Arches and Bridge Society. It is very photogenic.
Geology
Geology
Natural Arch
_____________________
May 13 2006
Ben
avatar

 Guides 2
 Photos 20
 Triplogs 3

77 male
 Joined Dec 27 2004
 Glendale, AZ
Rainbow Bridge via South TrailNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar May 13 2006
Ben
Hiking13.00 Miles
Hiking13.00 Miles2 Days         
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
A Trail So Rough That Even Freud Would Slip

It was early afternoon. A gray whale with seven eager hikers in its belly bumped over a road more suited to camel and jackass travel. The 4x4 crew-cab long-bed ¾ ton Dodge diesel carried these humans who had experienced psychological damage from years of city living back into the wilderness of their ancestors. They were seeking the beauty of nature and some relief from the pressures of cell phones and urban confusion. They were ready to backpack.
The trek was to begin at the historic Rainbow Lodge ruins and end with a ride across the earth's only monument valley on water. In 1909, John Wetherill led a couple ego maniacs across the deep canyons leading to the 300 foot high Rainbow Bridge. Immediately after this official discovery,, Americans with more money than brains wanted to see the newly publicized natural wonder. Nealy 100 years ago, the Richardsons, a family of Navajo traders, built Rainbow Lodge and forged a trail to the bridge for use by paying customers. Rainbow lodge, later owned by Barry Goldwater, was closed and burned to the ground over 50 years ago. The stone ruins remained on the southern flank of beautiful 10,388 foot elevation Navajo mountain and overlooked the deep finger maze canyons surrounding Cummings Mesa.
The first day, the crew that included Susan Richmond, Gary Johnson, Kathy Gindt, Roger Fournier, Lorna Peterson, Tim Blaser, and Ben Barstad made tracks for three miles while watching shadows of the late day sun move across red sandstone monuments. Tim turned back so he could make it to pavement with the Dodge whale before darkness left him lost in the reservation wilderness. He drove to Page and, as the shuttle driver, would meet the hikers at Wahweap two days later. The remaining six trekkers would camp at the first somewhat level spot they could find. Ben stretched out on a slab to enjoy a few minutes of comfort while a leaky air mattress deflated. Gary also slept in the open. The tent occupiers left the rain flies off so the beauty of deep space, only visible with the human eye where clear air and natural darkness prevailed, could be enjoyed by all. Lorna was able to watch a falling star shoot to earth.
This adventure was, as it should have been, not easy. The trail had deteriorated over the last 50 years and was covered with large and small rocks. Susan was shocked that it was not all downhill to the bridge destination. Wildlife was rare. Lizards were often seen and our lizardologist, Gary, was able to identify a rare Yellow Headed Collared Puff-Necked Lizard. and a Septicannus Brown Lizard. Everyone was impressed. Roger was excited. The Navajo Nation had given the crew a one page map that covered the entire area on an 8 ½ by 11 inch paper. "It ain't that long a trial." Roger told the crew. Roger loved his short trail map. Kathy attracted insects. Therefore, she wore a bee keepers hat through the entire backpack. Lorna ran into every thorny plant the desert had to offer. She was soon referred to as Thorna. Ben tried a shortcut off the mountain. Fortunately his tumble stopped about eight feet down. Gary, with his EMT training, plugged Ben's leaky skin so the two mile trip down the 1500 foot talus decline could continue. While Ben was hanging onto a rock over the edge, Lorna informed him, "Ben, that is not the trail." Ben had already reached that conclusion by himself.
Redbud Pass had been blasted by the Richardsons so jackasses, as pack animals, could ninety years ago, carry the goodies of those who were too lazy to do it themselves. The pass had become worse over the passing decades. Fantastic to look at, with high narrow walls of Navajo Sandstone decorated over the thousands of years with desert varnish, the pass was a true challenge. Once the crawling and scrambling had taken the trekkers to the top and back down the other side, Gary officially renamed it Red Butt Pass. He considered, but rejected, the name Sore Butt Pass.
Shortly before the water supply was exhausted, pools of water for filtering were located in Cliff Canyon. The last miles of the hike were fortunately less torturous for the tired travelers. When approaching Echo Camp, the hikers saw their first additional human figure. "He looks like Doctor Seuss." Thorna laughed. It turned out to just be some cat in a hat. Tim had bounced his jet ski 51 miles to Rainbow Bridge so he could also check out deep space and hear stories of near death experiences. Knowing that his clean rested persona could cause resentment on the part of this collection of bruised, limping, and stinking wilderness travelers, Tim had brought an offering. His small cooler of cold beer and soda pop made him seem godlike to all. Roger was captured, on film, in a position of worship to the cooler.
The last day, Gary was able to identify a short-tailed Carp. Then, the tour boat arrived and allowed the crew to relax and watch the wonders of Lake Powell pass by. The last night was spent at Camp Grandview, where everyone was able to shower, use facilities of civilization, and eat great tasting Mexican food someone else had prepared. The backpacking experience had prepared everyone to face the less natural civilized world again.
When all the façade of civilization was removed, individual psychology, both normal and abnormal, was displayed. It had also become possible to make some observations of hiker mental state and develop reasonable speculations.
Susan never stopped walking. She kept mumbling, "Keep on ticking." Did she possess a secret desire to become a Timex watch or Energizer Bunny? Tim had a great new many mega-pixel camera. Why did he try to take pictures under water. Did he possess some psychological need to test the warranty process? Did Roger suffer from cold beer fantasies? Was Kathy so altruistic that she intentionally attracted insects away from others? Ben took twelve great pictures. Then he put film in his camera. Did he suffer from digital camera envy? Lorna really wanted to find some less weighty dehydrated water for her next backpacking adventure. Was she absent from science class that day? And finally, Gary Johnson, when describing a Jackass Canyon hike, would slip and call it Johnson Canyon. His eyes also twinkled when he identified creatures. Was he afflicted with pumpkinosis?
Lumpy and limping, the crew returned to the greater Phoenix area with smiles. They had seen views reserved for those willing to get out and be there They also knew they could make the trip and were even willing to face new adventures. It was a great trip..
_____________________
Apr 21 2005
Ben
avatar

 Guides 2
 Photos 20
 Triplogs 3

77 male
 Joined Dec 27 2004
 Glendale, AZ
Rainbow Bridge via North TrailSoutheast, UT
Southeast, UT
Hiking avatar Apr 21 2005
Ben
Hiking14.00 Miles 8,000 AEG
Hiking14.00 Miles
8,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
North Rainbow Trail Report
In The 1913 Footsteps of Teddy Roosevelt and Zane Grey

For the purpose of reality, this report used aboriginal names for the participants. Aboriginal humans did not significantly alter their surroundings. They ate food they found or caught, slept on the hard Earth, drank water from streams, and watched the flames of a campfire at night. Televisions came much later. Our back packers were close to aboriginal for this trip.
The crew was made up of five back packers and four drivers/hikers. They drove from the metro area to the Arizona/Utah border in order to begin the adventure. Being 90 miles from the nearest town, they were able to psychologically adjust away from an urban mindset. They left the vehicles in Cha Canyon. Cha, the Navajo word for shit, was an appropriate place to begin the trek as adventurers could be heard muttering, " Ah shit, I forgot the ....!"
The four driver/hikers returned to Page, Arizona. They began by practicing driving 4/4 vehicles with which they were unfamiliar. After few rocks were Hummered, They began the exploration of Antelope, the most famous slot canyon on the planet. It had been featured in a Brittany Spears commercial, many movies, and publicized for the 1997 flash flood deaths of eleven European tourists. The hikers included Michele Aching Back, Cheryl Camera Clicker, and Fran Down a Gopher Hole. Lizardman Mike preferred to investigate his namesakes near Lee's Ferry.
The five back packers chose to carry needed items over sixteen miles of rock slide trail by walking around the north side of snow covered Navajo Mountain. This group included Susan More Hills, Freddy Fast Film, Benny Many Shoes, Roger Snores in Tent, and Mikey Two Sticks AKA Duck Tape Foot.
The first night was cold. Bald Rock Canyon was quite elevated and close to the snow. The back packers shivered to background music provided by a two member snore band. Snores in Tent and Duck Take Foot performances were enjoyed by all shivering aborigines. By morning all were ready for a day of watching, listening and hearing the beauty of the wilderness. Bald Rock Canyon was so picturesque that Fred considered building a cabin and starting his retirement. When a person, accustomed to walking on floors and paved surfaces, walks with a heavy backpack up and down hills on a rocky trail, the feet, lower legs, upper legs, hips, back, and shoulders get sore. The crew was able the enjoy this experience. The pain was not noticed as the surrounding beauty trumped it.
Surprise Valley was a surprise. A green valley surrounded with Zion sized formations on all sides and a background of a snow covered 10,388 foot mountain completed the picture. It was easy to see why the 1913 visit by Zane Grey led him to use Surprise Valley as the setting for his, Riders of the Purple Sage, and On The Rainbow Trail. A couple arches along the trail helped a bit also. The purple sage was becoming green due to a wet winter.
Bridge Canyon walls loomed overhead. A few more miles of elevation changes and the hikers were ready to camp in Horse Camp. It was located just outside Rainbow Bridge National Monument. The moon was full. Ever changing moon shadows were cast by sculptured high rock formations. Later, after the moon left the sky, deep space could be seen as it could have been observed by aboriginal ancestors who had no artificial background urban light to destroy it.
Early morning sunlight allowed Freddy Fast Film to create high expectations for a future slide presentation. The 58 mile trip back to Wahweap and Page involved a boat ride through Monument Valley on water (Lake Powell). A shower, a Mexican food feast, an Antelope Canyon visit, and a slight sewer problem completed this trip through reality.


Why do they do it?

Why do people chose to leave the comforts of an air conditioned room, a soft leather recliner, a full suspension SUV, tasty meals, and a pillow topped mattress on a king sized bed for a back pack experience?

Perhaps the seven million years of their DNA adjusting to Earth's conditions explains why looking at a campfire beats a TV performance. Possibly being able to sit on a rock strewn creek of snow melt water while looking at the Earth's greatest rock bridge as the sweet morning light turns it golden red helps explain why modern humans leave their comfort zones. Also, knowing that endless generations of our aborigine ancestors could have sat on the same rock and watched the gradually changing pictures before our modern urban escapees might answer the question. Wondering if one's thoughts regarding the views were similar to those of the early explorers and adventurers such as Teddy Roosevelt may help to explain our enjoyment as well.

A painting is a facsimile of life. A photograph is an image of it. Back packers get to actually see it and live it without most of the altering impacts of the last 150 years of mechanical manipulation (except for Gortex and few other changes).

Since food and some water were carried throughout the trip, the back packers did not get to hunt and gather as would a true aborigine. That experience was not needed. Our crew had hunted for food at Safeway and gathered goods at Wal-Mart. We had a great trip.

This report was from the mind of Bennie Many Shoes AKA Many Words, No Cha
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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