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High Peak Trail #300, AZ

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Guide 3 Triplogs  0 Topics
Rated  Favorite Wish List AZ > Tucson > Safford
Rated
2.5
2.5 of 5 by 2
 
1
Statistics
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Difficulty 1 of 5
Route Finding 2 of 5
Distance Round Trip 1 mile
Trailhead Elevation 9,556 feet
Elevation Gain 250 feet
Accumulated Gain 250 feet
Avg Time Round Trip 1 hour
Kokopelli Seeds 2.25
Backpack Possible - Not Popular
varies or not certain dogs are allowed
editedit > ops > dogs to adjust
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Photos Viewed All Mine Following
8  2012-06-19
Round the Mountain Trail #302
PrestonSands
15  2012-06-19
Round the Mountain Trail #302
SkyIslander18
11  2008-09-28 PrestonSands
Historical Weather
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Preferred   Jun, Jul, Aug, Sep → Any
Seasons   Spring to Autumn
Sun  6:50am - 5:18pm
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Official Route
 
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Water
Nearby Area Water
Ash Creek Canyon
Ash Creek Canyon
0.3 mi away
7.3 mi
2,300 ft
Columbine Corrals Campground
0.3 mi away
Ash Creek Trail #307
Ash Creek Trail #307
0.4 mi away
7.3 mi
270 ft
Webb Peak from Ash Creek TH
Webb Peak from Ash Creek TH
0.4 mi away
3.5 mi
900 ft
Webb Peak Trail #345
Webb Peak Trail #345
0.4 mi away
2.7 mi
794 ft
Blair-Ash Ridge Loop
Blair-Ash Ridge Loop
0.4 mi away
6.0 mi
2,082 ft
Soldier Creek Campground
0.5 mi away
Webb Peak via Soldier Creek
Webb Peak via Soldier Creek
0.6 mi away
3.4 mi
640 ft
Grant Goudy Ridge Trail #310
0.6 mi away
6.0 mi
93 ft
Deadman - Highline Trail #325
Deadman - Highline Trail #325
1.1 mi away
4.4 mi
1,332 ft
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Fauna Nearby
Flora Nearby
Meteorology Nearby
Named place Nearby
Stripped of glory
by PrestonSands

Overview: The High Peak Trail #300 is an unsigned and abandoned trail that once provided access to the summit of Mount Graham, locally known as "High Peak". While the designation of the upper reaches of Mount Graham as a refugium for the endangered red squirrel effectively closed the High Peak Trail in 1988, the Clark Peak Fire, along with the construction of telescopes and their associated service road, destroyed most of it. Only the bottom one half mile of the High Peak Trail is feasible and open to hiking, although there are a couple of short side trails to explore. The little information available on this trail from other sources is outdated, hence this writeup.


State highway 366, which provides access to this hike, is closed yearly due to snow from November 15 through April 15 (or possibly later), about 6.3 miles before the trailhead.

Hike: At the unsigned trailhead (32.70144 N, 109.91032 W) along the Swift Trail Highway, an obvious trail heads uphill to the east, away from the highway, marked only by a "closed to motor vehicles" signpost and a Refugium closure area map. This trail almost immediately comes to a fork among the tall aspens and spruce. The right fork is the trail, covered in deadfall. A left brings one to a water tank and shed, at which point one can make a right and catch the High Peak Trail within a short distance.

Past the deadfall blockade, the High Peak Trail becomes a bit more obvious, and is marked by ancient tree blazes and odd metal spikes in the ground. The trail soon comes to a spring bubbling out of a concrete block (32.70044 N, 109.90789 W), where a well trodden side trail joins from the left. Make note of this junction for the return hike, as the side trail dead ends in the forest.

The High Peak Trail continues past the spring to enter a large, sloping meadow created by the 1996 Clark Peak Fire. Surprisingly, it is still possible to follow the High Peak Trail through the meadow along a decent footpath.

At the far east end of the meadow, the High Peak Trail splits from the footpath and disappears into the tall grass. Instead of following the High Peak Trail, the better option is to just continue straight along the footpath, which reenters forest and turns south, before coming to a dead end (32.69793 N, 109.90567 W) at several University Of Arizona structures located near the telescope road.

If for some reason you want to follow the last bit of the High Peak Trail, return to the east end of the meadow (32.69924 N, 109.90605 W), where the High Peak Trail turns sharply to the northeast to climb uphill through tall grass and fallen trees. The trail, which exists only as a flagged route, crosses a switchback of the telescope road after a few hundred yards, near a sign that says "Celaeno 2". No trespassing signs located every few hundred feet along the road and the close proximity of the Red Squirrel Refugium boundary would seem to dissuade anyone wishing to continue on this fruitless hike.

Return the way you came, as the U of A probably does not welcome strangers!

PrestonSands
    WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

    Permit $$
    None

    Coronado Forest
    MVUMs are rarely necessary to review unless mentioned in the description or directions
    Coronado Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUMs)


    Directions
    Map Drive
    or
    Road
    FR / Dirt Road / Gravel - Car Okay

    To hike
    From Safford, head south on U.S. highway 191. Turn west onto state highway 366 (Swift Trail). Follow highway 366 (which later turns into forest road 803) approximately 28.4 miles to the unmarked and unsigned trailhead at milepost 142.8. The trailhead is approximately 0.35 miles before the Columbine Visitor Center, and is located at 32.70144 N, 109.91032 W. The High Peak Trail begins on the east side of the highway (see hike description).
    page created by PrestonSands on Nov 09 2008 10:32 pm
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