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Newman Peak - Southeast Route, AZ

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161 28 1
Guide 28 Triplogs  1 Topic
Rated  Favorite Wish List AZ > Tucson > Oracle
Rated
4
4 of 5 by 9
 
7
Statistics
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Difficulty 3.5 of 5
Route Finding 4 of 5
Distance Round Trip 4.1 miles
Trailhead Elevation 2,250 feet
Elevation Gain 2,230 feet
Avg Time Round Trip 4 hours
Kokopelli Seeds 15.25
Interest Off Trail Hiking & Peak
Backpack No
varies or not certain dogs are allowed
editedit > ops > dogs to adjust
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Photos Viewed All Mine Following
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17  2015-03-01
Newman Peak Trail
johnlp
9  2015-02-16 Jim_H
28  2015-02-14 Jim_H
26  2015-02-08 Jim_H
15  2015-02-08 chumley
10  2013-01-06 John9L
10  2013-01-06 joebartels
11  2013-01-06 chumley
Page 1,  2
Author Zepppower
author avatar Guides 1
Routes 0
Photos 9
Trips 5 map ( 54 miles )
Age 51 ?
Location Tucson, AZ
Historical Weather
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Preferred   Nov, Dec, Jan, Feb
Seasons   Autumn to Early Spring
Sun  6:14am - 6:21pm
Official Route
 
1 Alternative
 
Water
Fauna Nearby
Flora Nearby
Meteorology Nearby
Named place Nearby
Culture Nearby
Rugged
by Zepppower

Newman Peak is best described as a rugged backcountry hike. Sitting opposite of Picacho Peak, Newman is approx. 40 miles north of Tucson. Unless you want to add several miles to the hike, a 4x4 is highly recommended. Not only is there baby-powder like dust in parts of the approach road, it also lends itself to some pretty serious rocky terrain that no average car could handle. From your parking spot hike along the faint road until it dead ends at a firepit/campsite. If you have a four wheel drive vehicle, you may be able to drive to this location. This is the end of the trail and the rest of the route is cross country. The route to the summit follows the main gully that ends at the saddle between Newman Peak and the minor peak to the west. Follow the drainage up picking your way through cliff bands, boulders and cacti until you reach the summit.

Climbing the east side is the only real viable option unless you're using climbing gear and want to be on some very loose rock. An obvious gully on the east side takes you up steep terrain with a wide variety of choices and route selection. Experienced travelers will easily pick their way to the top following the various cliff bands and steepening rock-hopping. And have a fun but challenging day of it. Staying north as you continue upward you'll be rewarded with views of layers and layers of mountains in all directions. From the summit of Newman Peak many mountain ranges are visible: Santa Catalinas, Silverbell Mountains, Tucson Mountains, Superstition Mountains,Tortolitas Mountains and Table Tops Mountains, to name just a few. Not for the faint of heart simply because of the relentless steepness - the legs will surely get a workout.

History
A plaque at the base of this mountain states it was named for a soldier killed in the only battle of the Civil War to take place in Arizona. Ironically, another plaque in the area commemorating the battle does not list Newman.

Check out the Official Route and Triplogs.

Leave No Trace and +Add a Triplog after your hike to support this local community.

2003-12-11 Zepppower
  • guide related image guide related image guide related image
    guide related
WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

Most recent Triplog Reviews
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrated 4rated 4rated 4rated 4
Despite what I wrote in my last log, I realized that I simply had to go back out. I was to just be "smart" about it, however. I went up and down the same route, I stuck to the gully, and I avoided hazards as I could. I cliffed out only once and in the gully, and only ran into cat claw, which still tore me up but was better than cholla. I bled more, though. I also got tired of the cobble road and since the last time on it threw my tire balance out, I stopped much lower and added some elevation. The walk in is nice, and actually the desert out here is worth visiting even if you aren't going to the top.

Conditions were a little nicer this time, but it is rather humid from that low in Mexico. The views were hazy and it was cool, but still above "normal". I much prefer 80s. Some grass is losing it's green, but there are abundant bird calls.
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrated 4rated 4rated 4rated 4
Two days in a row saw me driving back out to the wildlife watering tanks to hike this. Unlike yesterday, I didn't cliff out half way up. Instead, I went a bit further south of the ridge I was climbing due to cholla, rocks, and unfamiliarity with the hike, and went for a sub-peak. It wasn't the big one, but that is further away. I went over to the summit and had to avoid a few more cliff sections. From there, down to the tanks, again cliffs, and made a huge mistake going well below where I should have been and cliffed out above where I cliffed out below, yesterday. Then I ran around like a mad man, gaining and loosing ground, going back and forth burning precious daylight. I didn't want to become a statistic and forced myself on a steep path with lots of lose rock, sharp pointy plants that are filled with hate, and greasy green grass over the rocks. I was back on the less deadly slopes before sunset, and my car by 645. I won't do this again for a while, and would only do it with other people. I think, for me, it is just stupid solo. My corpse would fester out there for days, before someone missed me. It is too steep, cliffy, and treacherous to hike like I hoped, and though I may summit once more, I doubt it will be another orange dot hike any time soon.
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrated 4rated 4rated 4rated 4
I considered tagging Newman and making this a generic hike titled, "Newman Attempt", but I think a tag has the same affect as logging a trip, with respect to the map dots.

Anyway, an attempt on Newman. I got my car out to the wildlife tanks, and could have made the summit if I had paid more attention to the cliffs above me. I sat for a while, descended thinking I would regain ground and eventually I accepted I was going to have to return tomorrow. It is a lot harder than it seems, but it is all off trail.
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrated 4rated 4rated 4rated 4
Jim was interested in summiting Newman and I was interested in a return trip. With Sunday off after a long work week that ended around midnight Saturday night, I was ready to get back outside. But it made for a late start on a warm day. We took a leisurely pace up, and stayed to the right of the gully the entire way. Winter rains have made everything incredibly green. There was grass everywhere, and I found it more comforting to hike on the driest, sun-exposed slopes.

Don't know if this peak is visited as rarely as it seems or if people just don't sign the register. There were only 4 entries since my last visit just over 2 years ago!

For the trip down, I opted for a new route, out to the east a bit. I wanted to check out the big water tanks I had seen on the way up. Looks to be just the remains of an older and unmaintained system now. From there we went down a nice ridge before cutting the corner a bit back toward the road, opting to stay above the wash that would have led directly to the truck.

It could be the last couple of miles of rough dirt road, or maybe the State Trust permit required to access the area, but this is a really fun mountain and it gets relatively little use for how close it is to the 5 million people in Phoenix and Tucson.
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrated 4rated 4rated 4rated 4
I have wanted to do this for several years, at least since 2012 and maybe 2011, as when I would drive past it coming from Kayenta and/or Flagstaff, it is such a impressive and exciting looking mountain that I really wanted to summit it. It is sort of harder to access, and if I should repeat it as I hope to do before the weather warms to high over 90 or so in the desert, I expect to not get my Outback in as far as Chumley's truck and thus I will have several more miles and a few hundred more feet of AEG. It is however, an interesting and currently a very green area to enter. Lots of birds in the area, too.

Otherwise, what can be said? A fun scramble hike for long periods going up, interesting terrain, attractive vegetation with massively tall Saguaros and a few really old junipers on the top, awesome views, bird calls, perfect warm temps (for me), interesting Geology: Pusch's smaller brother?, and an over all great hike. I wish access was slightly easier, but I expect familiarity with the area would improve that aspect of the hike. Also, a lack of a trail, a trailhead, and the unimproved roads means solitude in a very populated area on a prominent and impressive peak, that would otherwise be overflowing in a fashion similar to Picacho Peak. Either way, a great hike!

Wildflowers
A few POPPIES! were noted.
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrating optionrated 3rated 3rated 3
Always wanted to hike this one after seeing it from Picacho. Nice hike, a lot shorter than I expected. Unfortunately the wind made it hard to enjoy the top. Probably better not stay too long anyways with all the EMF.

Thanks for organizing this, Bob and Nick! And thanks for driving, Bob! High clearance and a good GPS track is needing for getting to the trailhead.
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrated 4rated 4rated 4rated 4
bobby rocket feet invited me on his hike up newman peak, which i've wanted to do forever. the views up top were even better than i'd imagined, though it was pretty frickin cold and windy up there. we did find a nice spot to chat for a while, out of the wind.

great to see some familiar old faces and meet a couple new HAZers too. hopefully we'll cross paths again sometime soon :y:
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
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Liz, Tim, 9L and I got up at a ridiculous hour of the day to enjoy a spectacular sunrise at the top of Picacho Peak. On our way down we decided that it would be a waste of a day not to do something else, so we headed across the I-10 and grabbed a few delicious carbs at the DQ before the excellent adventure that is the road to the start of the Newman hike. If you ever need to get somewhere on a crazy road, you can't go wrong with Liz as your driver in her Suby.

It was 34 degrees and we headed up the drainage for 10-15 minutes before we all decided to lose a layer or two. In the distance we saw another vehicle headed our way and figured it could only be some crazy Hazzers. It took 9L and me 1:15 to get to the peak, with Tim and Liz a few minutes behind. It was nice to see the other Hazzers arrive a few minutes later. The top was uncomfortably cold, with a steady 30 mph wind. We descended a bit to a sheltered spot below the boneyard that both Bob and I had noticed on the way up.

After 45 min or so of snacking and humor we all headed back down to the saddle. We had a planned fundraiser to attend and decided to head down, while the others headed west toward the lower peak.

I somehow acquired a stack of HAZ stickers a year or two ago, and I keep them in my truck and usually offer them to fellow hikers when I first hike with them. As we were driving out I noticed that the other HAZ vehicle parked out there didn't have a sticker so I decided to do a good deed. Yeah. So that might not have turned out quite as well as I had hoped. Might not do that again.

Hiking-wise however, a good day all around!
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrated 4rated 4rated 4rated 4
Helloooo Jerry!

The drive in is blah. Don't think a Caddy will suffice, high clearance best for some dry mud ruts.

Ridges are my preferred off-trail way to ascend as ravines typically get choked with vegetation. Bob mentioned a ravine up and I was skeptical. It turned out to be quite awesome. It's loose and steep in areas but nothing remotely technical.

Chilly and windy up top. Good to see and chat with other HAZ'ers.

I really liked the area. The saguaro concentration was thick. Which was unexpected after the drive in. The light colored rock is a nice alternative.
looping option thoughts

No water. Only witnessed a red Chuparosa or Penstemon type wildflower.
Newman Peak - Southeast Route
rating optionrated 4rated 4rated 4rated 4
Chumley was in touch with Bob about hiking Newman Peak. He asked if I was interested and of course I was. We made our way to the trailhead followed by Liz & Tim. We arrived and started making our way up. Right from the start it's all off trail and you follow the drainage up. As we proceeded we kept looking back and finally saw a group of HAZers making their up near the trailhead. We continued on and followed the drainage up.

The "hike" up is definitely some work but nothing overwhelming. We made slow and steady progress and eventually reached the saddle. From there it was a short hike across the ridge followed by another scramble towards the summit. Finally we neared the summit and cruised up the final section. The hike up took roughly an hour and fifteen minutes.

Once on the summit Chumley and I had a look around. It was extremely windy and chilly. After a few minutes Liz and Tim joined us. We were getting ready to return when Bob's group showed up. After a few minutes chatting we combined forces for a lunch break in a small clearing surrounded by rocks that helped block the wind. We chatted for a while and then our group started making our way back towards the saddle. Bob's group was going over to the south end and we were heading down. We said our goodbyes and then the four of us proceeded down.

We got back to the truck and started making the drive out when we passed Bob's SUV parked along side the road. Chumley stopped his truck with an evil grin on his face and jumped out. He walked over to Bob's car and cleaned the back window and then placed a HAZ decal on the window. I wonder if their group saw it. See pics

Afterward we made our way back to Phoenix. It was good meeting everyone and hope to hike with all of you again down the road!

Permit $$
AZ State Land Recreational Permits are available for an individual ($15.00), or a family limited to two adults and children under the age of 18 ($20.00).




Land Parcel Map


Directions
Map Drive
or
Road
Strictly 4x4

To hike
From Tucson head north on I-10. Exit at Picacho Peak offramp and head toward the northeast side of I-10. Follow the frontage road south for 5 miles until you reach Park Link road, turn left. Follow Park Link for 0.7 miles to Pecan Road, turn left on Pecan and follow it for about 4.5 miles to the intersection with another dirt road. Follow this road to N32 40.174 W111 21.198, and then take a left turn. After you make the left turn you will be heading into a large basin that is capped by the summit of Newman Peak. About 1.6 miles down the road there will be a cattle gate, pass through it and close it behind you. At this point the road gets increasingly more difficult and the need for a 4-wheel drive becomes necessary.

2007-01-20 johnr1 writes: Pecan road is posted state trust land no trespassing written permission required about 2 miles in. I assume this means that a state land permit must be secured before opening the cattle gate and accessing the mountain.
HAZ recommends: Contact AZ State Land and specifically verify before entering this area
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