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Camelback Summit - Cholla TH
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mini location map2005-04-03
5 by photographer avatardavidmurphy
photographer avatar
 
Camelback Summit - Cholla THPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 03 2005
davidmurphy
Hiking3.00 Miles 1,275 AEG
Hiking3.00 Miles
1,275 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Unlike others, I did not want to park my car on Invergordon and walk the mile or so uphill just to get to this trailhead. Instead, I rode my bike to the Cholla trailhead and locked it at the city-provided bike rack. I had a heavy backpack, which included about three liters of water. I wanted to see how much water I would need or want on this hike, so I brought a bunch. As it turned out, I drank about two liters during the whole trip, as it was about 82 degrees on this April Saturday. Many other hikers I saw only had 16 adn 20 oz. bottles, which I thought was too little for the moderately strenuous hike on a warm day.

Anyway, it took me an hour and fifteen minutes to reach the summit, with a few rest stops to take wildflower photos along the way. After resting for ten minutes at the summit, I started down on my 40-minute descent (no rests).

I took my GPS, but it kept losing the signal as the trail runs below the ridge of the mountain.

I saw quite a bit of wildlife, including, gambel quails, rabbits, lizards, hummingbirds, monarch butterflies, sparrows, inchworms, and spiders. The most annoying of which were the thousands of bees that were buzzing around the omnipresent wildflowers. I kept remembering the story in the news last year about the 30-something year-old man who died when hiking Camelback. He was apparently being stung or harrassed by a swarm of bees and was seen jumping off the mountain trying to elude the bees. Not that either way would be a good way to die. With this thought, I just walked by, through, and around the bees at at steady pace, pretending that they weren't there. They allegedly don't sting you if they aren't aggrevated. On this hike, I saw a young woman who was waving a bee away from her face, flailing her arms, screaming, and running. That would seem to me to be an aggrevation. Don't let the bees deter you from this great hike. It has got to be one of the greatest, most accessible, most beautiful summit hikes within any major city in the US.
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