username
X
password
register help
This is likely a great time to hike this trail!  Check out "Prefered" months below, keep in mind this is an estimate.

Red Rock Canyon Trail #223, AZ

details
drive
permit
forecast
route
stats
photos
triplogs
1 new
topic
location
7 0 0
Guide 0 Triplogs  1 Active Topic
Rated  Favorite Wish List AZ > Tucson > Douglas
Rated
0
0 of 5 by 0
 
0
Statistics
clicktap icons for details
Difficulty 4 of 5
Distance One Way 7 miles
Trailhead Elevation 5,836 feet
Elevation Gain 2,484 feet
Accumulated Gain 2,662 feet
Kokopelli Seeds 15.87
Photos Viewed All Mine Following
7  2017-11-26 Guy
Author HAZ_Hikebot
author avatar Guides 16,880
Routes 15,964
Photos 24
Trips 1 ( 6 miles )
Age 22 Male Gender
Location TrailDEX, HAZ
Historical Weather
Trailhead Forecast
Radar
Expand Map
Preferred   Apr, Oct, Mar, Nov
Sun  6:21am - 6:29pm
openimportsetbegin
Route Scout App
17360followactivity
Official Route
 
0 Alternative
 
Water

Likely In-Season!
Rucker and Red Rock Canyon trails provide access to a landscape of deep canyons and high peaks in the southern reaches of the Chiricahua Wilderness.


Rucker Trail starts at the end of Forest Road 74E at Rucker Forest Camp and winds upstream along Rucker Creek through a deep forest of Arizona sycamore and cypress and ponderosa, Apache and Chihuahua pine. Portions of the creek along the trailside hold water year round and serve as home to a small introduced population of trout. Just upstream of the perennial water, Rucker Trail switchbacks steeply up the canyon's east slope to join the Red Rock Canyon Trail. Beyond this point, the trail descends 0.8 mile to its junction with the Price Canyon Trail #224.

The trail up Red Rock Canyon starts from the end of a primitive road, in an area of juniper and oak woodlands. For about 2.5 miles, it follows the floor of the narrow canyon named for the colorful rhyolite rocks that form its walls. The trail then switchbacks up and out of the canyon, over Sage Peak and along a high ridge to its junction with the Rucker Trail. There are good views along both of these trails, which you can take as a loop, if you don't mind traveling forest roads for about 4.5 miles between the trailheads. Both trails also provide access to a number of other Chiricahua trails including (by way of the Price Canyon Trail #224) the Crest Trail #270 along the top of the mountain range.

Leave No Trace and +Add a Triplog after your hike to support this local community.

2018-07-14 HAZ_Hikebot

    One-Way Notice
    This hike is listed as One-Way.

    When hiking several trails on a single "hike", log it with a generic name that describes the hike. Then link the trails traveled, check out the example.
    WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

    Permit $$
    no fees or permits reported

    if incorrect tell us about it

    Coronado Forest
    MVUMs are rarely necessary to review unless mentioned in the description or directions
    Coronado Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUMs)


    Directions
    Map Drive
    or
    Road


    To hike
    From Douglas, take Leslie Canyon Road north to Rucker Canyon. Stay on the main road, which will become Forest Road 74. For the Rucker Trail, turn left (north) on FR 74E and continue about 4.7 miles to Rucker Forest Camp. The trailhead is at the end of the road. To Red Rock Canyon Trailhead, follow FR 74 to FR 74E, turn left (north) and drive about 3 miles to a primitive 4-wheel drive road (FR 4242) that turns right and down over a bank. Follow this road across Rucker Creek to a parking area where you can choose to park and walk to the trailhead or continue driving to it. Horse trailers should be parked along FR 628. These roads are rough and dusty and may be muddy and slick when wet. There is a flash flood danger at water crossings following summer and winter storms.
    page created by joebartels on Dec 07 2012 5:09 pm
    help comment issue

    end of page marker