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Dec 04 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Waldron - Dripping Springs - Silver Bell LoopNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 04 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Hiking13.00 Miles 2,100 AEG
Hiking13.00 Miles   5 Hrs   30 Mns   2.60 mph
2,100 ft AEG      30 Mns Break
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Made a nice loop with Waldron/ Silver Bell. I didn't have much time for research so I figured this was something new that I could just figure out as I go.

Waldron is charming. I almost prefer it to Hermit, but maybe it's just the novelty. It was nice how the canyon emerges from the oaks and the descent was pretty efficient. I didn't love the walking distance from the car, though.

I'd also use Silver Bell more if not for the access issues. If anything, it was difficult to follow in the Coconino because the old trail is indistinguishable from game trails in several spots. It's also quite overgrown and I didn't love leaning off the track to avoid prickly pear. Lots of route options, though. Above the Coconino the trail has a nice gentle grade and passes through two more small basins. It looks like horses access the trail below the Kaibab.

I spent less time in the canyon than I expected, but then I only went down to the Hermit shale. Back on the rim, the corral at the head of Silver Bell was the most interesting feature. Maybe I should have turned around and hiked back through Hermit basin instead.
Dec 03 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Old Hance TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 03 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Hiking8.50 Miles 4,000 AEG
Hiking8.50 Miles   10 Hrs      1.06 mph
4,000 ft AEG   2 Hrs    Break
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
My objective for the weekend: Oldey Hance! Once again I appreciated an excellent route description from Doug Nering's webpage (I won't rehash routefinding details because one should default to his instructions).

Everything I read said "steep and loose" and happily my anxieties about "loose" were largely unfounded. For the most part I stayed in ravines, not on ridges. There was a good amount of easy scrambling/ butt-sliding but mostly I could get away with cautious plunge-stepping. The very top of the Coconino was a bit tricky and there seemed to be a fresh slide with very loose, large slabs for one small section. At one point I stepped on an apparently stable, keg-sized boulder only to hop off as it went careening downhill.

It was important to leave the ravine to the east at the esplanade cliff - the boulders become so large that continuing to scramble down quickly becomes a real climb. Game trails and the old track emerged in some spots in the lower supai. The loosest section was the redwall chute. Once in the bed I got overexited and had to backtrack to pass the last large pouroff safely.

I found Hance's corral but didn't look hard for the cabin - I'll be back. I also found the names in Hance creek, although I wasn't looking specifically. Once back on the trail the hike was fast! The redwall section by Page Spring seems in better shape since last year, following the washouts. I chatted with a friendly couple who have been hiking in the canyon for decades on the last mile up.
Nov 23 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Tonto Trail: Boucher Trail to South Bass TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Backpack avatar Nov 23 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack81.00 Miles 13,500 AEG
Backpack81.00 Miles5 Days         
13,500 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
A long out-and-back on the gems for Thanksgiving weekend. The canyon was very quiet - especially once out of the flight corridor.

Water report: I didn't bother to look up/down drainages. These were all visible from the trail/ at the crossing. I was traveling fast and weather was cool so water needs were low.
Serpentine - one large pool at crossing
Ruby - several potholes at crossing
Jade - small pool below crossing
Turquoise - pool below crossing
Sapphire - below crossing
Slate - at crossing

Day 1 - I got a midmorning start down Boucher. Within the first 2 minutes on Hermit I saw 4 bighorn sheep chasing eachother across the ravine. I carried spikes just in case there was ice on the way to dripping springs but the trail was dry. Then the long contour above the supai interspersed with delicious first-day snacks (sandwich, blueberries, leftover apple crumble). The washed out drop into the supai is yucky but brief - it actually wigged me out more on the hike up. Down near Boucher creek and on Tonto I spotted 3 groups (the only people I'd see for four days). I stocked up on water at the jct with Topaz creek, anticipating a dry camp and not wanting to take the time at Slate. Then a race against the sun to reach the plateau west of Slate creek, which was much warmer than the cute camps in the drainage.

Day 2 - I was happy to get early sun. I had an ambitious day but I couldn't resist lounging in Sapphire for a bit. There were a few spots with excellent views down the river but for the most part I was racing through drainages. The trail was much fainter. Ruby and Emerald were somewhat exposed near the head of the drainages... Emerald was especially tedious with the sidehilling and bushes. I had to turn on my headlamp at the head of Serpentine but luckily the trail was easy to follow to the next plateau, where I camped.

Day 3 - I left camp early again and day-hiked down to Bass beach. I thought I might see people this day because I think the Bass zone was supposed to be full, but I missed everyone. Following Bass creek down is very cool - I didn't realize how much faulting there is in that area. I spent about 2 hours lounging in the sun on the beach, looking across at the Powell Plateau and Shinumo drainage. On my way back to pack up my camp I saw a little tarantula on tonto - my only one of the season, and very cute! I packed quickly and nipped over to the plateau west of Ruby to camp.

Day 4 - A long day of countouring on my way back to Slate. It's a good thing I had audiobooks downloaded. Clouds rolled in in the late afternoon so I was treated to an orange sunset. It was nice to see the hermit trail in the distance after being so far from folks. In the afternoon I developed some nasty hot spots... turns out even darn tough socks have a mileage limit before they get crusty and need to be replaced. My feet are still healing 5 days later.

Day 5 - I woke up on the plateau east of Slate and had a relatively short day, for once. On my way through Boucher creek I saw no sign of people but I did see some very brave mice. Progress was slow because I had to baby my feet (in clean socks, at least). Boucher actually spreads out the elevation gain quite nicely... a flat section for every ~1k vert. I also love the views along this trail. I was a bit chilled from all the deep shade so I had a nice lunch break in the sun on Yuma point. Then I finally saw another human on the way back to dripping springs! We chatted for a while. He also spends lots of nights in the canyon but this was his first trip on Boucher. Once at the dripping springs jct the rest of the trip was quick. I "juiced" myself with tylenol and caffeine and was able to ignore my poor feet during the final climb on Hermit. Also helps that my pack probably weighed about half as much as on day 1.
Nov 20 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Bright Angel TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 20 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Hiking10.00 Miles 3,000 AEG
Hiking10.00 Miles
3,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Nice day hike to (newly renamed!) Havasupai Gardens with friends. No need for spikes yet - the seep below Kolb studio covers maybe half of the trail. Cold in the shade.
Nov 17 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Cardenas route, AZ 
Cardenas route, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Nov 17 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack35.00 Miles 9,000 AEG
Backpack35.00 Miles3 Days         
9,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I snagged a last-minute permit to camp on the beaches near Tanner and took the opportunity to attempt the Cardenas route (~ from hilltop ruin to the top of the redwall). This was a lot of fun!

Days 1 and 3 - I just hiked up/ down Tanner trail. It's pretty quick but I usually get distracted and scout from the trail. There were lots of folks backpacking (I barely got my permit) but it didn't feel crowded because most were groups of two. On my way out a runner lapped me on his way down and up - he was moving!

Layover day - I got a somewhat late start and hiked along the beach toward the hilltop ruin. I found some cool artifacts in one spot - a pot and kettle with paint remaining. It's pure luck that I stumbled across it, you can't see it from any distance.

I left the beaten track at a saddle in the hatakai shale and dropped into Cardenas creek near its large fork. I followed this for a ways and had a great angle to scout my line. I'd studied the route description on Doug Nering's webpage, which is excellent. I followed a somewhat loose line of tapeats boulders through most of the basalt, then had a short scramble up the basalt at the point. There are two cairns here which would be helpful on the descent. There's a bit of a track along the base of the tapeats to the tapeats break. Folks say the tapeats break is difficult to locate when you don't know where it is and I agree - I only assumed it was behind the corner I couldn't see from below. Again, this break was straightforward though there's one spot where I took off my pack to climb up and crawl under a ledge. I'd want to use a rope for overnight packs. Another tiny cairn marks the best spot to get down this ~4ft ledge.

In and above the tapeats there were plenty of sheep droppings to quicken my routefinding. I hiked slightly east of the drainage through the redwall to bypass some cliffbands, then decided it'd be easiest to maintain my bearing until I reached the bottom broken limestone cliffs. Getting off loose talus and onto solid rock was delightful - I had a great time scrambling up the redwall chute. This was the easiest part of the route. Near the top of the redwall there's a clear track. Once at the redwall saddle with 75mi creek I contoured in the lower supai to the redwall campsites overlooking the river. There were also good sheep trails through here and the going was faster than expected. Near the camping area I noticed several small snail shells, which I haven't seen in the canyon before.

Back on the trail with just a day pack, I positively trotted down to the beach. Then I stuffed myself trying to reduce my food weight for the hike out :lol: This route was strenous but not technical, and routefinding is straightforward from below.
4 archives
Nov 11 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Grapevine Creek - Grand CanyonNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Backpack avatar Nov 11 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack30.00 Miles 7,500 AEG
Backpack30.00 Miles3 Days         
7,500 ft AEG28 LBS Pack
 no routes
Partners none no partners
Made a trip out to Grapevine to scout the redwall route that Harvey describes. Overall, a very enjoyable trip! In addition to the beaten path we visited the river via old grandview and the narrows below the tonto crossing.

Day 1: we got a cold and early start down Grandview. There is snow and ice to the coconino already. At horseshoe mesa we encountered a large group also heading to Grapevine - that surprised me. We were quite far ahead of them when we reached the old grandview cairn and dropped our heavy packs.

The lower section of grandview is in great shape for being so obscure! It's well cairned and follows a very natural break through the tapeats. It seemed illogical to go over the first saddle in the basement rocks but it was clearly indicated. Down here we had a great view upriver and at the pouroffs in Cottonwood. We saw rafts floating all in a line down the river - reminded me of ducklings. The trail braids a bit before crossing a ridge and heading down a narrow chute. I wouldn't have gone here without indication - it looks so improbable. Then over another small saddle and down a long ravine to the river. Some loose footing but nowhere that feels like you're about to fall over a cliff. We had a short break at the river and the return hike was faster than the way down. On the way up I bonked my head on an overhanging branch... guess I shouldn't wear baseball caps in places like this (it isn't the first time). I'm fine, though!

We hiked the rest of the way in to the camps on the eastern arm of Grapevine. Turns out the big group are high schoolers on a school trip doing a big section of Tonto. At camp we had mice coming under the vestibule (we were snacking in the tent). This was not pleasant but stopped (I think) after we hung the food. A bit surprising as I thought this was an unpopular camp.

Day 2: we had a leisurely morning before starting up Grapevine. The tapeats narrows are beautiful! We could follow the creek for almost a mile before a chockstone and some falls forced us out of the bed. It's easy to find the exit. We were able to drop back in and easily follow the creek for a while in the shale too. We found some stone structures around here... 2 circles about knee-high and maybe 10ft in diameter. Not sure what they're from.

The cottonwoods were turning in the creek and beautiful. But the going got very slow when we encountered Grapevine's namesake. We stuck to low game trails which weren't great. Around here we found a dead ram with big horns. The creekbed clears up again near the redwall. Below the fall we easily located the redwall route on the east side. We ascended a boulder field to the amphitheater then circled around to our approach. I scrambled high enough to look over the fall - maybe 1/3 of the way up. But I'd left my pack below and wasn't in the mood to scramble all the way up then back down without a spotter. On the way down I took a wrong turn and ended up downclimbing while straddling an agave. Not my happiest moment. There was a bit of a game trail on the talus here and the scrambling was probably class 3 so I definitely want to return and connect to the trail above.

On our hike back down we followed a ridge west of the creek to avoid the grapevine tangles and other vegetation. Game trails and footing were much better here. Back at camp, we explored the tapeats narrows below Tonto. My friend climbed up the pouroff into the west arm of grapevine but I'm not much of a climber and I couldn't get up.

Day 3: another relatively late start. Clouds started rolling in and making pretty light when we were in Cottonwood. As we ascended we watched snow start to fall below the north rim. We got flurries then were briefly enveloped in gentle snow above the coconino. On the rim I watched the clouds part to the west. There was a little bit of a cloud inversion, which I've been wanting to see in the canyon for ages. What a gorgeous finale to the weekend.
Nov 05 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Escalante RouteNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Backpack avatar Nov 05 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack28.00 Miles 7,500 AEG
Backpack28.00 Miles2 Days         
7,500 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Made a lovely overnight on the Escalante route last weekend! I love this area and particularly wanted to camp on Escalante beach someday. Happy to say, sections that made me nervous on previous trips didn't phase me at all on this one - I guess exposure to exposure helps!

I started down Tanner at sunrise on Saturday. I saw much fewer people than usual - only two parties all the way along Tanner and the beach. One woman told me about her trip down the Cardenas route to the hilltop ruin and now I'm itching to try it. I had a short break at the boater camp at Cardenas, which is pretty nice. Then I made my way up into that big drainage in the Hatakai shale.

My feet were sore from sidehilling by the time I reached the ridge leading into Escalante cr. I love the view from there - such contrast up and downstream. I was making good time so I took another break when I reached the Escalante creekbed. There I met a couple more hikers who I'd end up sharing the beach with. I left before them and had a pleasant hour before sunset to stretch on the beach and play in the sand. There's a nice little bay below Escalante which I was attracted to before. The sunset was excellent for canyon bottom sunsets - big pink and orange clouds.

I had a warm enough campsite (far back from the river) that my body didn't complain about an early start. Nevertheless, I lingered to eat breakfast on the beach again. On my way along the top of 75 mile creek I looked for possible entry points before the main break in the shinumo. I thought I found a few and confirmed that they looked viable from below - two across from each other just after entering the drainage, and one ramp to the east further down. I also thought I found an old hole from prospectors along the rim.

I met a group on the 75 mile beach who had camped at the bottom of the unnamed (hatakai traverse) drainage. They were only hiking to hance rapids that day and I was envious of the time they could take. I followed the river-level route over the Papago (it's faster and easier than the trail) then had an easy time climbing the wall and locating the upper break where I've gotten stuck before. On my way down the slide I heard voices and I was confused because I didn't think the group was that close behind me... lo and behold, another group was coming up the slide! We communicated to avoid dropping rocks on one another.

As I arrived at Hance rapid, boaters pulled in to scout. I filtered water and snacked and spent enough time on the beach for the 75m group to catch me and watch the rafters run the rapid. Then the slog up New Hance... I was definitely gassed last time I did this because it was hard but not ridiculous. I also did a better job staying on the main trail - last time, I was scrambling up a wash in the supai following cairns. I really want to hike up red canyon sometime. I saw deer trails above the tapeats crossing the saddle towards mineral canyon and there were golden cottonwoods in the creek.

I met two groups of hikers on my way out. The second were also hiking out when I passed them in the coconino - I think they weren't amused by their friend/ leader saying this route was "fine". I met their TL waiting with a car and he said he'd been denied a permit to do Escalante over 2 nights. I said a light pack helped (I maxed out at 20-22lbs with 3L water) and the office knows me.

All in all, a fantastic weekend! I biked back to Lipan Point and arrived to catch sunset.
Oct 29 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Pipe Creek CanyonNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 29 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Hiking16.50 Miles 5,600 AEG
Hiking16.50 Miles   9 Hrs      2.20 mph
5,600 ft AEG   1 Hour   30 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
My goal for this day was to hike down Bright Angel, walk up the bottom of Pipe creek and come up onto the tonto platform as described in the Tomasi book, and hike out South Kaibab via the Skeleton point route. It all went great until I reached the first cliff :lol:

I reached the chockstone at the bottom of Pipe creek and climbed the slope on the east side. I wasn't sure where to go around and back into the creekbed - there were at least three possible levels with faint sheep tracks. First I went to the very top. The slope was loose and I didn't love it. I looked around the corner and said "hell nah" - I assumed there'd be another slope but upon checking the book I was supposed to follow a "decomposing ledge". No ledges looked appealing anyway. I checked around the corner at two lower levels and also felt sufficiently cliffed out. Things definitely looked climable, but I'm not a climber. There was webbing above the chockstone and it looked so close. I followed a track back down to the creekbed and had an easier time descending than expected.

I was a bit bummed my plan didn't work out because now I had to either hike up crowded Bright Angel or all the way over to South Kaibab on Tonto. But I consoled myself by finding the base of the old devil's corkscrew and then following the old trail all the way up to Tonto. I only lost it at the very top where it crossed the wash. I thought this trail was still in great shape and much faster than the new one. I saw an interesting hollow at the base of the tapeats.

I took my time looking down on pipe creek from above. It's pretty cliffy at the head. I found a broken china plate. It's a good thing that pipe creek had good flow because otherwise I'd have had to return to Indian Garden anyway. It took an hour to ascend the slope and redwall break to Skeleton point. I came up just as some hikers were looking over the break and they just said "that was unexpected".

All in all, an enjoyable hike with some new ground. I'll have to go back to tag pipe creek another day.
Oct 21 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Nankoweap TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Backpack avatar Oct 21 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack38.00 Miles 10,000 AEG
Backpack38.00 Miles3 Days         
10,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
This was an especially fun trip! I love when the canyon gets a little weather (aside from wind - my tent pole is bent for a reason). The plan was one day down Nankoweap, a day to explore from the beach, and one day back up. We lucked out and had a cool hike out. The road was the most uncertain part of the trip - there is a bit of a limestone ledge and I've got a sedan.

Day 1: Somehow I thought the hike between house rock rd and the trailhead was 3 miles with 300 vert. Nope! I was pretty annoyed to carry 6L water up that hill. Late fall colors were pleasant though.

This was my first time in the area and dang, what a view from the Nankoweap TH! Unlike a lot of trails, it's hard to see Nankoweap trail very far ahead. It's still a very nice trail - as in, nice that there is a trail. The "spot" in the supai seemed overblown to me, and by a certain point you get bored with exposure and stop worrying anyway. It was heating up by the time we reached tilted mesa. It looks like the redwall could go into Little Nankoweap from here but I only looked briefly.

The only decent camps we saw in Nankoweap creek were right where the trail reaches the creekbed. We were so tempted to nap but wanted to reach the beach at a decent hour. The walk down Nankoweap was longer than expected - almost an hour at a decent clip. I saw a cute canyon treefrog on a boulder - camoflauged almost too well, because I nearly impaled it! We also met some packrafters who'd come from Buck Farm. I think they'd had an intense day.

We visited Little Nankoweap, which has a very nice beach and eddy. A small group of boaters was doing a layover and asked about the hiking. Then we hiked over to the main Nankoweap beach camp and found a very sheltered camp. We met more boaters there - a group of guides from other rivers - and had drinks around the fire with them.

Day 2: The boaters had offered us a ride down to Kwagunt and we enthusiastically agreed. River travel is so efficient and pretty! I paddled a duckie, possibly on the last day of the season when I'd be okay with being splashed. Some of my food got splashed and I still ate anyway it so hopefully I don't get giardia next week. We rode one of the rafts through Kwagunt rapid and I'm very glad I didn't do that in the duckie. Kind of crazy to know that those folks were camping all the way down at Carbon that evening while it'd take a few long days to reach by foot.

We hiked a couple miles up Kwagunt creek. It was dry nearly to the fault, which seems drier than usual. Walking up the fault was very different from other canyon hiking - a flat sandy bed for a while. There were some fun scrambles where the layers were almost tilted vertically. We hiked up left of the fault and "knob", and there the wind hit us. This day and into the next, the whole west was being buffetted by cold air and some snow. Blowing sand didn't feel great so we got off the ridge quickly and hiked further around into the Nankoweap side of the fault.

This creekbed was much steeper and rockier. There were some more fun scrambles. We found a little (~6ft deep) mineshaft(?) with old tools and a pry-bar inside. Back in Nankoweap creek we hustled towards the beach. Clouds were rolling in from the north rim. Nanko creek looked like a wind tunnel and other hikers would confirm that the next weekend. We had a sheltered little nook at the beach, and being my anxious self around wind, I'd taken down my whole tent and put rocks on the edges for while we were away.

We met another friendly group of boaters - guides from the Snake - at the beach. They had halibut and boy, it smelled amazing. We enjoyed their hospitality and stories around the fire.

Day 3: The wind kicked up overnight and it showered a bit. Listening to the gusts at 4am, I was a little nervous about the hike out. But this died down.

We left the beach before sunrise and made quick progress (it was too cold for stops). I found a pair of intact rose-colored sunglasses in a bush - lucky, because my friend had just broken his! They are very stylish.

We caught some mean gusts on top of tilted mesa. In a few shaded spots in the supai there was just a dusting of snow. The trail was still in great shape. Where else can you go from 90 degrees to snow in 48 hours?
Oct 14 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Beamer TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Backpack avatar Oct 14 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack45.00 Miles 8,000 AEG
Backpack45.00 Miles3 Days         
8,000 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
I originally got this permit for a Salt-Tanner trip but couldn't find a ride after some last-minute changes. Instead I went in and out Tanner, which was still nice.

Day 1: Met lots of folks on their ways down Tanner. The camps in the lower Supai and above the Redwall are nice but I've never taken the time to stay in one. I had a quick break at Tanner beach before continuing onto Beamer.

The river was very low and new sandbars were showing. I spent a nice hour playing in the water below Palisades and waiting out the heat of the day. Nevertheless, I was still hot climbing onto the Tapeats around 3:30pm (I swear, 3pm is the hottest part of the day for me! But the park only emphasizes 10-2).

After a couple of miles shade from Temple/ Chuar buttes fell over the Beamer trail and I felt better. As the sun was setting I saw it glint off the desert view tower. It's fun looking back at how far you've come in just one day. I reached the beach below the confluence just before I would have needed my headlamp. My company was friendly and we chatted a bit about canyon routes and watched the stars.

Day 2: I hiked to the viewpoint above the confluence early and watched the "alpenglow" on the buttes/ rim opposite. After a while I continued upstream - after all, I still had a permit for the salt trail. I found the Beamer cabin (*cough* something's waiting for a Brooks inside). There was a decent bootpath for a few miles, probably helped by all the USGS research folks. There was a lot of debris and trash from recent flashing upstream. I found tracks that look like mountain lion, which is surprising because I didn't know they got down to the river.

I returned and packed up my camp around 11. A raven had attacked my rat sack - it didn't get food but it ripped my ziplocks and left me with a real mess. Beamer was hot again but there were shady spots in the ravines. It's all well and good where you're walking above the river and have a nice breeze, but when you turn into the drainages the direct angle of the sun fries you. I overdid things a little and ended up retching after one of the bigger ravines. I also drank water much faster than usual. I was happy to return to my sandbar below Palisades. Then I made the quick hike back to Tanner just before dark. Tanner beach was crowded.... I suspect some parties were meant to be in Cardenas but overlooked that detail on their maps.

Day 3: I started up Tanner trail just after sunrise. After the previous two days, I didn't want to be caught in the heat again. I was in the Muav by the time the sun hit me. I saw several runners heading down to do Escalante, which didn't seem the safest in that weather or with that relatively late start (I'd also start at New Hance if pushing Escalante). I took my sweet time once above the redwall. The climb through the Coconino sucked - big surprise.

I need to stop taking all my favorite snacks into the canyon and expecting to still be able to eat them on the drive home. I was craving more popcorn but stuck with regular ol nuts :(
Oct 08 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Boucher Rapids via BoucherNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Backpack avatar Oct 08 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack24.00 Miles 6,000 AEG
Backpack24.00 Miles
6,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
Took a group out for a nice weekend on Boucher and Hermit. Boucher trail is in decent shape - it is a trail :) The section to dripping springs may have had the worst exposure. Otherwise, Boucher isn't nearly as bad as it looks from the Hermit trail.

NPS reported a big ("football-field size") washout at the supai descent. There was a notable ~40ft section at the start of the supai descent but I have no idea where this huge slide was. The walk along the top of the redwall was pleasant and I was charmed by how natural the redwall descent was. We soaked our feet in the creek before heading to the beach. I located the Boucher cabin and noted lots of piles of little rocks on another terrace - possibly Boucher's old veggie garden.

I'm not sure where boaters pull into the Boucher beach - perhaps it used to be bigger? We had a nice warm evening on the sand then were awoken by the near-full moon later. Once the moon set on our beach the shadows on the opposite side of the river were very cool. We also saw headlamps all the way over on the hermit trail just below cathedral steps.

On Sunday I led part of the group over to Hermit creek because I like loops. We spent a nice hour+ relaxing in the tapeats narrows. We paid later because the ascent through the bright angel shale was in the hottest part of the day. But we made it out at a decent hour and watched a spectacular sunset from a lookout above Monument cr. Bumble bee was on the tonto near Monument and we watched them fly out... that impressed the scale of the canyon on me more than hiking has.
1 archive
Oct 02 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Grandview TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 02 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Hiking4.00 Miles 1,900 AEG
Hiking4.00 Miles   5 Hrs      1.45 mph
1,900 ft AEG   2 Hrs   15 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I had the clever idea to leave the trail near the head of Grapevine and countour around the Supai into the redwall above Cottonwood. Ha! Looking at Harvey's (multiple) lines after seeing this up close, he's crazy!

I'd considered dropping into Grapevine where the trail crosses the ravine but that looked ridiculous once I was there. I started by heading north along the ridge after the first saddle.There is some clear use here and the scrambling was even a little fun (moreso on the way up). I tried a few lines down the slope into the ravine but there was a thick layer of loose dirt and even some slabs were sliding. Other reports had mentioned cairns here but I must not have had the right line. It certainly looked doable, but I didn't relish the idea of an unstoppable slide, especially when alone. I think I may attempt hiking up this way instead someday.

I ended up hiking to the base of the switchbacks on Grandview then back up for a nice workout. I met some other canyon-obsessed backpackers on their ways out, so that was cool!
2 archives
Sep 25 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Skeleton Point RouteNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 25 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Hiking13.80 Miles 5,000 AEG
Hiking13.80 Miles   8 Hrs      2.30 mph
5,000 ft AEG   2 Hrs    Break
 
no photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Did the fun lollipop down south kaibab and up the miner's trail. I definitely did some class 4 scrambling in the redwall that I don't remember. It was hot but I like this route because you can stay in shade (esp compared to SK) if you're early enough. The hustle and bustle of the main trail always feels abrupt after coming over the redwall saddle.
Sep 15 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Cranberry Canyon attempt, AZ 
Cranberry Canyon attempt, AZ
 
Backpack avatar Sep 15 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack42.00 Miles 10,500 AEG
Backpack42.00 Miles4 Days         
10,500 ft AEG28 LBS Pack
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Took 4 days to backpack around Deer and Tapeats creeks. We were hoping to return to Indian Hollow via the cranberry route but couldn't find the redwall route before it got very hot. Overall the trail was slow (or NPS mileages were off) but it was very rewarding.

Day 1: Indian Hollow to Deer Creek. There were thunderstorms the previous afternoon and for a couple hours fog was evaporating off the esplanade - what a pretty effect. Potholes were abundant on our hike down and somewhat more limited on the return trip. We didn't have trouble following the old trail along the esplanade to Bill Hall jct although others reported it was difficult.

It was already warm by the time we reached Surprise Valley but we promptly found a big rock with ample shade. We made sure to stay on top of food and electrolytes and still got hot by the time we reached the creek, where we took a long break in the water. The trail to deer creek is slow over boulders and talus, but the rocks are stable. On the way to the campsite we found some flowers which were absolutely swarmed by tarantula hawks. I got excited about the photo opportunity until I noticed a truly giant wasp....

After setting our tents we continued to the patio and the beach. Wow. Possibly my favorite mile in the whole canyon. We debated and decided you'd likely die if you fell off the ledges above the narrows so we made sure to return to camp sober and before dark. As soon as we arrived on the beach a boater walked straight over and offered us beers and trash service - how wonderful! We had enough time for a quick dinner and wade around the falls before heading up to bed.

Day 2: loop through Thunder River/ Tapeats Creek. We started early and were treated to beautiful light once we got over our intial hill - golden beams shining onto the opposite side of the canyon. The trail was easy walking for about a mile and reminded me of Beamer. Some big pontoon boats passed below - that was my first time seeing them and... they're a bit much.

After a quick wade in the river we started up into Tapeats Creek. It got hot fast when we were on the hotter rocks. The trail was a little exposed on both sides of the river, but river left was worse. The Thunder River crossings weren't evident so we made our best guess. We found a nice pool and probably spent a good hour sitting in the river around noon. This paid off later because our hike out to Surprise Valley was cooler than the rest of the day had been. There were also two easy access points to the waterfall and we took advantage to keep cool. Back in Deer Creek we enjoyed dinner at the patio and filtered lots of water (thank goodness for gravity filters) to prepare for our tough next day.

Day 3: Cranberry crack attempt. We got an early start and each carried 7-8L water. Right off the bat we took the hard way up to the ancient lake bed, going over the lower saddle instead of the upper. The lakebed was very cool and the easiest walking of the entire trip. We lost elevation rather than try to sidewalk on the talus below our goal slope. First we headed straight up and lost access to cross the big ravine to climbers right. We descended partway after realizing and found a cairn indicating where to enter the ravine. There was another cairn in the ravine that wasn't visible from the first cairn, so we added one to fill the gap. The scrambling got easier for a little while, although it continued heating up. The nastiest section was talus at the base of the redwall.

Thinking our chute was at climber's left, we climbed to the base of the redwall and used handholds on the cliff to stay secure on this nastiest bit of talus. My friend climbed to the only possible chute we saw and said it was no-go. We'd already decided that was our last ditch and we weren't wasting time in the heat searching for our chute, so we promptly turned around. I think the proper chute was actually slightly to the right above us but I'd accidentally deleted my reference photos, GPX, and notes - ugh! We had a hot, slippy, slow climb back down the talus and were relieved to return to a semblance of flat ground. This time we took the higher saddle to exit the ancient lakebed with much better results. When we reached the trail he proceeded to the patio for a very welcome rest, then down to the beach/ falls again for dinner.

Day 4: Missing the Cranberry route meant we had a long hike out. We hit the trail at 5:15am and worked hard to ascend out of Surprise Valley before the sun hit us. We took a bit more time on the esplanade, finding a few nice shady spots on the slickrock where we couldn't resist breaking. Only the largest/ most sheltered potholes were still full.

I had some nasty hot spots developing (strangely, I never noticed them until I took my shoes off each evening so they got quite bad) and I was quite "over it" by the time we began our final ascent to Indian Hollow. After dumping excess water (my pack was probably now below 15lbs) I got a second wind and was marching along... until the trail routed around a dead tree. The tedium of scrambling 15ft down loose talus just 5 minutes from the trailhead nearly broke me. Once on the rim, I was hardly interested in a last look into the canyon, but that's about normal for me. Happily, I had grilled cheese fixings waiting in my car.
Sep 10 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Plateau PointNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 10 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Hiking14.50 Miles 4,000 AEG
Hiking14.50 Miles   9 Hrs      2.23 mph
4,000 ft AEG   2 Hrs   30 Mns Break
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
I was in my "it's summer, it's to hot in the canyon" mindset but then I wanted to hike and wasn't inspired by Sedona or Flagstaff hikes. So I told myself this hike would be good training for hiking in the heat of the canyon, plus I needed some elevation training.

I headed down bright angel at sunrise with the idea to explore below plateau point, find some ruins, and maybe tag battleship on my return to the rim. It was overcast and around 8am thunder started to the east. I was below Indian Garden by this point so I opted to find some shelter in the tapeats. I found a large overhang that had clearly been camped under before. I was >10ft above a streambed so I felt I'd have some warning in case of flash flood, and I had lots of space on flat boulders beneath the overhang. There were two charcoal names on the wall of the overhang - R.N.GOODE from New York City and A.B.GRRETT (Garrett?) dated May 6 1890. That was pretty cool, but I haven't figured out who these people were yet. I spent almost 1.5 hours here and stayed pleasantly warm and dry.

Searching for a break in the tapeats, I first started down the wrong ravine and cliffed out. My intended canyon was further west and a pretty comfortable/ fun scramble. I didn't see the alleged pine tree but I didn't spend time looking. On my way through the tapeats I found a small pothole with teeny frogs hopping all about. They were so dang cute, I love frogs.

I headed east along the bottom of the Tapeats following a sheep trail. There were so many sheep tracks down there - some just since the storm. Nothing felt exposed but there was some awkward talus-hopping and bushwacking. A clearer human use trail eventually appeared on a little plateau below me and this was faster-going. It clung to the base of the tapeats, where less vegetation grows, and only disappeared for a bit below the cliff I'd approached from above. I saw the water pipe and electrical cable and passed below Plateau point, where a good assortment of water bottles, broken sunglasses, and hats were scattered on the slope. I retrieved some of these (even a big flag - really people?) and I'm bummed I didn't find nice sunglasses to keep. There's a nice view of garden falls along this route and it's spectacular - another thing on my to-do list.

I also visited some pueblo ruins, a fairly intact granary, and well-preserved pictographs on this trip. These were all very cool. I found a cute rattlesnake inside a stone alcove (I assume white-man construction). I think I saw a tarantula hawk flying along the bright angel trail at one point.

The hike out did not feel like a piece of cake :( time to whip myself back in shape. About a mile from the rim, the sun finally popped out.
Aug 24 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
North Lake/ South Lake via Lamarck Col, CA 
North Lake/ South Lake via Lamarck Col, CA
 
Backpack avatar Aug 24 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack35.00 Miles 8,500 AEG
Backpack35.00 Miles4 Days         
8,500 ft AEG23 LBS Pack
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
I was pleasantly surprised to see that California wasn't smoked out by mid-late August so I made this pitstop on my drive back to Arizona. What perfect conditions! No nasty storms, snow hazards, bugs, or smoke!

Day 1: North Lake to Darwin Bench. Lamarck Lakes trail is much less travelled than its neighbor, Piute Pass. I also think the lakes were nicer - big mountains towering over Lower Lamarck and calm teal Upper Lamarck. The route to Lamarck Col is well-traveled and the bootpath is clear until the final ~200 vert scramble which is usually snow-covered. There were no running creeks above upper Lamarck - just drips directly from the few remaining snow patches. Coming from sea level, I wasn't surprised to be feeling very slow by 11.5k. I continued on to Lamarck Col at 12.9k despite feeling increasingly lousy. By the final push, I was sitting down every 10-20 steps to manage nausea and a pounding head. I kept close tabs on my condition because I knew it'd take a lot of effort to descend below Darwin Bench on the far side if things went south. I met a climber on the col who was planning to solo the entire Evolution Traverse the next day - damn.

The lakes in Darwin Bench are stunning. The lake below Mendel Glacier was a wonderful teal-green. The lakes all in are clear, but there's a slight teal tint in the highest one. I found a lovely sheltered camp between some lakes with no wind and excellent sunset/ sunrise views.

Day 2: Darwin Bench to Wanda Lake. I got an early start around the lakes and my illusion of solitude from the previous day was broken as I encountered several other parties before even reaching the JMT. But silver lining - I'd forgotten my toothpaste and backpackers are generous folks. Lots of fish were jumping out of the lakes in the early morning.

I picked a nice slabby route down before rediscovering the use trail that links to JMT below Evolution Lake. Evolution Lake is definitely my favorite in that basin - just the right amount of trees and meadow. From here I took my sweet time ascending to Wanda Lake. There were stretches that I recognized for being particularly frustrating during the hellish postholing on my May trip. I had a little laugh to myself about how much easier things were when the trail was visible and my feet were dry.

Clouds rolled in around noon so I hustled to find a campsite along Wanda Lake by 2pm. I ended up being rained on for about 10 minutes after 4pm, but apparently the south side of Muir Pass got dumped on. Somehow I missed the obvious huge camping area near the head of Wanda in favor of an obscure (though sheltered) nook invisible from more than 20ft away. I visited some JMTers at the nearby site in the evening then left to watch sunset over Lake McDermond.

Day 3: Wanda Lake to upper Dusy Basin: I thought climbing the gradual 500 vert to Muir Pass first thing in the morning would be a piece of cake after spending two nights near 11.5k - I was wrong! But while I was slow at least I wasn't still getting sick. The descent past more lakes was gorgeous in the morning light and I almost wish I'd camped at Helen Lake. Here too, I remembered the false summits and frustration with snow.

This was my longest mileage day and I made a point to take care of my feet. My arches have been protesting at long (not even that long!) hikes so I massaged and stretched them every couple miles. Descending into Le Conte canyon on the JMT is as impressive as the decent from Dusy Basin - the walls are just so dramatic! I had a nice refuel beside the river and watched small fish swimming around a logjam.

I was anticipating a tough climb into Dusy Basin and for once I over-psyched myself. It was hot and uphill and at altitude, but really, it was tolerable. There are some big isolated junipers a few hundred feet above the trail jct and they look really majestic. At the bridge over the waterfall a mule train passed me headed down. They were much smaller and cleaner than canyon mules - adorable. I learned later that they were likely resupplying a trail crew below the Le Conte Ranger Station.

The lowest lake in Dusy basin was much more overgrown and less charming in late summer than in May. I took a snack break and sadly spilled a bunch of my crackers into the lake. I camped at the lake at ~11.3k. This lake was gorgeous and crowded for good reason. I chatted with my neighbors (again with the toothpaste quest) and we had a bit of a hoot when we realized we'd both taken part in heli rescues in the canyon, and likely seen the same pilot.

Day 4: Dusy Basin to South Lake: Finally I crossed a pass at 12k with some momentum. I was hustling on this last day because I expected a hitch back to North Lake to take a while. The trail was crowded with Saturday hikers and the lakes on this side were unimpressive after being so spoiled so I only stopped to baby my poor arches. I spent nearly 2 hours at the trailhead before getting a ride with 4 other hikers who'd done the tradition North/ South lake loop.
3 archives
Aug 01 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Cat Basin, WA 
Cat Basin, WA
 
Hiking avatar Aug 01 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Hiking24.70 Miles 6,300 AEG
Hiking24.70 Miles   12 Hrs      2.35 mph
6,300 ft AEG   1 Hour   30 Mns Break12 LBS Pack
 
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
What a gorgeous day to spend on the high divide! The breeze kept the bugs at bay, lakes were smooth and glassy, puffy clouds set the scene. Even a bit of a cloud inversion in the Hoh and towards the strait. The crowds were minimal all things considered.

I started up towards Deer Lake and took a nice break at Lunch Lake. I continued up in the lakes basin toward the ridge. There are so many nice little tarns, I'd love to spend a whole day just rock-hopping in there. There are some unmarked trails that appear to lead down to long and morgonroth lakes.

Instead of turning down toward Heart Lake, I opted to explore the Cat Basin trail. The trail is in great shape until Swimming Bear lake. There it forks and the Bailey Range trail appears to get more love. Swimming Bear is charming and nicely tucked away from the crowds. I counted 16 newts just when I went to collect water! The trail crosses the lake outlet then disappears into talus and took some real searching to find again. I got lucky finding the trail again because it was just visible when I was leaving a snow patch.

Between Swimming Bear and Appleton pass the trail cuts across the steep slopes. In the meadow it's very apparent but thin and eroding. It's easy enough to figure out the general idea when crossing talus fields because there's little vertical change. The worst are the treed sections where the trail is horribly overgrown and you have to guess your way around downed trees on steep slopes. I got pretty mixed up in one forested spot where the trail appeared to split and ended up scrambling up a loose chute (better up than down).

Above Appleton Pass I startled a bear in the shrubs. It crashed right off but I got jumpy because someone had told me about a bear with cub in the area earlier. The tarn at Appleton is less charming than I'd imagined - silty and with a bathtub ring. I didn't linger long because I had a long hike back through the forest. As much as I get annoyed with trees blocking my view, I have to admit the forest along Sol Duc is kind of pretty with all the moss, huge trees, and nurse logs.
1 archive
Jul 25 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Cameron PassOlympic, WA
Olympic, WA
Backpack avatar Jul 25 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack43.00 Miles 13,500 AEG
Backpack43.00 Miles4 Days         
13,500 ft AEG27 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Possibly the most "wow" trip I've done in the Olympics. If I could change one thing, I'd have done it in reverse to save the best for last. Also, the heatwave didn't feel any gentler at this moderate elevation.

I parked at Deer Park, hiked over to Obstruction Point and down into Badger Valley. Then up the valley, taking some time at the lakes, to Grand Pass. Down Grand Pass (the south side is pretty steep and loose), along Cameron creek (some blowdowns and washouts) and into upper Cameron. Between upper Cameron and Lost Pass was easily my favorite section - meadows, sweeping views of the peaks and glaciers, little water features. In hindsight, I would have camped on Cameron Pass (and also Grand Pass) instead of in the basins. Lots of blooming meadows on my way down Dose creek, then a very hot climb to Gray Wolf Pass. There are some pretty tarns on the north side of Gray Wolf and an unmarked-but-certainly-constructed trail that leads northwest towards Cedar Lake. I didn't see if it goes all the way to Cedar Lake - another time. The hike along Gray Wolf was pretty and much better maintained below Camp Ellis. Finally a hot slog (and no water access) back up the hill to Deer Park.
Jul 20 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Anderson GlacierOlympic, WA
Olympic, WA
Backpack avatar Jul 20 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack40.00 Miles 8,500 AEG
Backpack40.00 Miles2 Days         
8,500 ft AEG26 LBS Pack
 no routes
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Made a quick trip out to the Anderson "Glacier". This was meant to be a longer itinerary but alas, I missed the puppy at home and got tired of looking at trees. Soooo many trees along Dosewallips. Views of the mountains don't really open up until Camp Siberia.The abandonded ranger station is interesting and campground nearby has great sites along the river. The road walk is tedious but means more solitude once you're out there. This was my first trip this summer where I didn't have to ford anything in my boots!

I found just enough room on the ridge above the Anderson Moraine to camp (more than one person would have to camp on the moraine). What a glorious campsite - views down the Quinault valley and a close up on Anderson peak and the tarn below. Avalanche lillies were in peak bloom on the hill above Anderson pass and indian paintbrush, columbine, lupine, valerian, white bistort, etc. were starting up by the ridge.
Jul 13 2022
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 Routes 5
 Photos 195
 Triplogs 35

female
 Joined Mar 26 2022
 Flagstaff, AZ
Stoney Indian PassNorth Central, MT
North Central, MT
Backpack avatar Jul 13 2022
shelby147Triplogs 35
Backpack58.00 Miles 10,000 AEG
Backpack58.00 Miles4 Days         
10,000 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Glacier had lingering snow (plus the rangers certainly exaggerated this to me :roll:) so I took a safe relatively low route to explore the park. Made a bit of a loop out of Many Glacier with Ptarmigan Tunnel and Red Gap Pass, plus exploration out to Stoney Indian Pass in the middle of the trip. I wish I'd spent more time up high because the bugs at the big low lakes were fierce!

But I had a great adventure nevertheless and met some cool hikers. Didn't see any big wildlife and that's perfectly fine. The less-travelled trails are quite overgrown by annuals up to chest high. Thru-hikers I met said all passes on CDT are finally thawed enough to skip snow equipment.
3 archives
average hiking speed 2.03 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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