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Havasu Canyon Trail
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mini location map2014-09-15
45 by photographer avatarDave1
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Havasu Canyon TrailNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 15 2014
Dave1
Hiking32.00 Miles 3,600 AEG
Hiking32.00 Miles   14 Hrs   15 Mns   2.61 mph
3,600 ft AEG   2 Hrs    Break
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Down to the Colorado and back. Was hoping to get some nice shots of the contrasting waters at the confluence but it was packed full with bright yellow boats. Same thing happened when I was at the Little Colorado confluence last year. It's funny that the boaters freaked out a couple years back when someone left a 10mm rope dangling from Deer Creek but I guess their neon flotillas are perfectly fine to clog up every nice viewpoint.

Not many people down here today. I guess because it's a Monday in September. Still warm enough to enjoy the water though. Lots of dogs roaming around as usual, from the hilltop down to the village. I noticed many of them have collars and tags now. Wonder if they get shots too? They seem mostly friendly except when they fight with each other for a spot closest to the hikers. I imagine if you fed one, it would follow you the entire day. There's a pack of about 8-10 horses that just hang out in the hilltop parking lot. Not sure if they're working horses or not. They weren't tied up and had no saddles. They just lazily roam around, sniffing the cars. Wonder where they get water?

On the way back out I took a long break on the patio of the restaurant. I was watching the helicopter make multi-drops of people and supplies when, at one point, a stray horse wandered into the landing field (the gate was open). The guys unloading the supplies chased it around the field until it went back out the gate. Then as it was running up the main drag, another resident must have thought it got loose so he shooed it back into another open gate and back into the field. So now these guys are chasing it around the field again but this time they start pelting it with rocks. The horse was panicking and didn't know where to go. Rocks were being hurled at it from all directions. He ended up falling down after a really hard rock hit and it looked like he broke or hurt a leg. He was finally able to limp out of the field and scurried off towards the lodge. So what started off as sort of comical turned into a sad case of animal abuse. At least they learned to close the gates. I noticed afterwards that they were unloading horse feed. I guess they were worried that the skinny, malnourished horse was going to, you know, get something to eat.

Edit/add:
I got a few PMs requesting more info so I'll add some more.
The trip from Beaver Falls to the Colorado is about 3.5 miles one way according to Route Manager (I didn't bring a GPS with me). The trail is mostly cairned, well worn and easy to follow. The creek crossings are marked with cairns except for the last one, but you'll be able to see the trail on the other side. I can't remember exactly how many but I believe I crossed the creek either 5 or 7 times. The creek crossing were all easy. Mostly ankle deep but some knee deep. This would change with varying flow rates. At one point on the trail there is a neat tunnel you'll have to walk through. I would recommend getting to the confluence as early as possible in hopes that you beat the rafters there so you can get some good pictures. My guess is they start showing up around 9 or 10am.

A Havasupai Ranger stopped me at the border as I was coming back into the Rez. He was friendly but did ask to see my day pass ($44 for the day).

In my opinion, this hike can be done year 'round. You can start from the hilltop early and, with the help of the narrow canyon walls, avoid the sun. Once you're down in the creek, you'll have plenty of opportunities to cool off in the water. Then leave the village late afternoon and enjoy more shade. The only unpleasant section would be from Havasu Falls to the the other end of the village, where you won't find much shade.
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