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Reynolds Creek Trail #150
90 Photosets

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mini location map2020-08-15
18 by photographer avatarJohn10s
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Reynolds Creek Trail #150Globe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 15 2020
John10s
Hiking4.40 Miles
Hiking4.40 Miles
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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TboneKathy
I returned to Reynolds Creek for the second time in three weeks in search of some obscure Salado ruins (sometimes referred to as "Site V:1:162") that I first heard someone mention about nine months ago during a hike to Pueblo Canyon. I'd done a little research that didn't turn up any definitive directions, but I felt confident that I had enough clues to find the way. On my first visit two weeks ago, I learned that Google Maps doesn't recognize FR 410, the final four-mile stretch of dirt road off of Highway 288 that ends at Reynolds Creek Trailhead. Instead, Google Maps routes vehicles to FR 3222, which is extremely rough and strewn with boulders, downed logs, and large ruts. I ended up hiking down FR 3222 to the trailhead, which added ~ four miles each way and turned my first visit to Reynolds into a round-trip effort of nearly 17 miles to the intersection with Murphy Ranch Trail and back...but unfortunately, no ruins.

This time, I returned after a little more research and knew better than to trust Google Maps. Avoiding FR 3222 and taking FR 410 to the trailhead saved considerable time and mileage, and this time the search for the ruins was a success. Like others who have visited before, I won't post the route or directions here out of respect for the site. I've visited several of the ruins sites in the Sierra Anchas, and this was one of my favorites, partly because of the thrill of the search as well as the relatively inaccessible location, and partly because of the uniqueness of the cave where the ruin is located.

This one is a multi-level cliff dwelling located inside a cave and consisting of four of five rooms. I was impressed with the quantity and size of the pottery shards at the site, along with a grinding stone. The cave is ~30-40 feet high in the back and has a natural opening at the top, which I suspect provided nice ventilation for fires for the inhabitants. Much of the structure is well-intact, especially the roofs of two of the rooms, one of which included a square "skylight". In several areas, finger marks are visible in the mortar where the builders smoothed the material over the rocks hundreds of years ago. This structure also had vertical wood supports in the walls, which I hadn't seen in the other Salado ruins in the Sierra Anchas.

There was a second cave located nearby that had evidence of habitation, with some rock and wood in the opening, but whatever once existed there was badly deteriorated. Definitely one of the more impressive ruins sites, and I look forward to exploring more of the Sierra Anchas!
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John10s'
87 Photosets

  2020-09-20
  2020-09-05
  2020-08-15
  2020-08-08
  2020-07-03
  2020-05-30
  2020-03-07
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