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14 triplogs

Jan 17 2014
TrekSafari
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Apache Wash Loop Sororan Preserve N, AZ 
Apache Wash Loop Sororan Preserve N, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Jan 17 2014
TrekSafari
Hiking6.10 Miles 168 AEG
Hiking6.10 Miles   3 Hrs   30 Mns   2.36 mph
168 ft AEG      55 Mns Break
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Apache Wash Loop, Phoenix Sonoran Preserve, North

January 9, 2014

The elevation was 1,700’ at the trailhead.
I hiked west .3 miles on the Ocotillo Trail to the Apache Wash Trail,
then north .3 miles; then walked along the Sidewinder trail;
I should have gone another .5 miles to the highest segment of the Trail.

This portion of the hike climbs 170 feet in .8 miles starting at mile post 1.2
and 275 feet in .9 miles starting at mile 2.3.
The descents did not seem to be as bad as the ascents.

On the descent from the hilltop, I walked the old jeep road as an alternate path
for the switching from the Sidewinder Trail to the Ocotillo Trail.
I then followed the Ocotillo Trail back to the trailhead.

I returned on January 17, 2014. East of the trailhead parking area I observed a couple of hot air balloons at low altitude. I commended the hike, more balloons floated westward, keeping relatively low but high enough to skip over these hills. I have attached tdhree photos.
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Jan 03 2014
TrekSafari
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Dinosaur WashPrescott, AZ
Prescott, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 03 2014
TrekSafari
Hiking6.30 Miles 500 AEG
Hiking6.30 Miles   5 Hrs      1.26 mph
500 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
See the alternate route tab for a track along the Scenic Loop Road from US-93 to the trailhead.
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Dec 19 2013
TrekSafari
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Sidewinder Ocotillo Loop, AZ 
Sidewinder Ocotillo Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Dec 19 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking5.00 Miles 100 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   3 Hrs      1.67 mph
100 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Sidewinder Ocotillo Loop, Phoenix Sonoran Preserve, North

December 19, 2013

There were 35 hikers this morning evenly split between guys and gals. We took the 101-loop to I-17 then headed north to the Carefree highway, the east to 7th Avenue. Just west of the traffic light at that intersection, we parked on the shoulder of the highway – the shoulder was wide enough to pull straight in and long enough for 30 vehicles.

The trail surface is great and generally 30-36” wide. The path along the Sidewinder Trail is rather hilly with gradual elevation changes. This trail merges with the Ocotillo Trail which we took back towards the trailhead. But we shortly walked over to the paved bicycle path and sat around the cement under a Ramada (no picnic tables here nor were there any toilets at the trailhead.

We hiked 5.1 miles in three hours. The path climbed from 1800’ to 1900’ in the first mile then descended to 1700’ just after our snack break at the remade, then 1880’ a half mile from the concluding descent to the trailhead.
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Dec 11 2013
TrekSafari
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Apache Loop, AZ 
Apache Loop, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Dec 11 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking5.00 Miles 200 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   3 Hrs      1.67 mph
200 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Apache Loop, Phoenix Sonoran Preserve, North

December 11, 2013

I took Union Hills east to Cave Creek then north to the Sonoran Desert Drive and the trailhead. The trailhead is at 1600 E. Sonoran Desert Drive; it has toilets.

I hiked west 1.8 miles on the Ocotillo Trail to a dirt road; it had been plowed recently so as to return it someday to natural. I walked northward .6 miles to the Sidewinder Trail [just aim for the homes on the NE side of the Phoenix Sonoran North Preserve. Walk eastward to the trailhead.
I saw only one couple hiking, one young lady jogging and four guys on bicycles. The trail climbs from 1700’ to 1800’ in the first mile, then descends to 1700’ by the second mile, rises to 1900’ by 2.7 miles, drops to 1740’ by mile 3.5, rises to 1860’ at mile 4.2 before arriving back at the trailhead.
I hiked only three hours with two short rest/snack breaks. Four Peaks Mountains can be seen to the east. They have a “compass” pointing towards several mountains; the pointer for Four Peaks is about 15º off.
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Nov 14 2013
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Ma Ha Tauk Max Delta Bajada Trail, AZ 
Ma Ha Tauk Max Delta Bajada Trail, AZ
 
Hiking avatar Nov 14 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking2.00 Miles 450 AEG
Hiking2.00 Miles   2 Hrs      1.00 mph
450 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Partners none no partners
Ma Ha Tauk Trail, South Mountain, Phoenix, AZ
November 14, 2013
From central Phoenix drive west to 19th Avenue then South to the end of the road. The parking lot is on the left.
There are no facilities at the trailhead.
Ma Ha Tauk Trail merges with Max Delta Trail which merging with Bajada Trail.
The trail starts out relatively level but climbs 400 feet in the first .7 miles.
The trail goes slightly downhill & crosses the paved road about two miles from the trailhead.
There are an abundance of other trails nearby.
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Oct 24 2013
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Sunrise Mountain - PeoriaPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 24 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking4.30 Miles 420 AEG
Hiking4.30 Miles   3 Hrs      1.43 mph
420 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
October 24, 2013
I read a posting to the HikeArizona Triplog for September 2012; the author had “parked on the south side of the mountain on a dirt road, just on the other side of Happy Valley Rd.” I am not certain that it is wise to hike across the Happy Valley multi-lane divide highway. The only legal access seems to be the Westgate Park.
I walked from that parking lot past the two hills on their east side, looping around the south-most hill and returning back to the starting point. That is about a 4.3 mile walk with an elevation varying from 1400’ to 1800’. It took just under three hours.
It seems impossible to add post a track/route to this site; so I did not.
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Oct 21 2013
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Sunrise Mountain - PeoriaPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 21 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking3.10 Miles 420 AEG
Hiking3.10 Miles   2 Hrs      1.55 mph
420 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
October 17, 2013
I started at the Westgate Park. The trail heads on a level surface to the elementary school; their parking lot is closed to the non-staff when school is in session. Th trail then heads south looping around three hills. I think the less difficult trails for the first two hills is on the East sides; but I did them on the other side; so I was not in the shade of the hill later in the day. I did get an earlier start this morning so I was off the trail before 9:00. As I recall the path on hill #two is difficult to follow from its highest point back to the north; there are a lot of side trails that go nowhere. The walk was about 3.1 miles long which I walked for about two hours.
About 2,000 feet from the parking lot there are two survey stakes both Arizona D.O.T. Hwy. Div. P&M Geodetic Survey, 1986 one stamped Wing the other is Wing R.M.2. They are about 40 feet apart, due east/west. Why two surveying groups could not agree as to the Longitudinal remains a mystery.
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Sep 08 2013
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Los Caballos Trail #638Payson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Sep 08 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking5.40 Miles 783 AEG
Hiking5.40 Miles
783 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
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Jul 11 2013
TrekSafari
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Naomi Peak Trail 0711 SC, UT 
Naomi Peak Trail 0711 SC, UT
 
Hiking avatar Jul 11 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking1.51 Miles 909 AEG
Hiking1.51 Miles   1 Hour   9 Mns   1.65 mph
909 ft AEG      14 Mns Break
 
no photosets
1st trip
Naomi Peak Trail Northern Region Utah
Trailhead: Driving Distance from Logan: 28 Miles; Drive up Logan Canyon US-89 to milepost 480.8, turn left; the seven-mile paved road ends at Tony Grove Lake.

Elevation: starting = 8000’, 8430’@1st mile, 9150’@2nd mile, 9894’@3rd mile

Highest peak in Bear River Range. Summit offers a view of the surrounding peaks. A landmark hike in the Cache area. Great view down Smithfield Canyon. Meadows of wildflowers north of the lake along the trails.
At about 2.7 miles is a path to the right which descends to High Creek Lake in about one mile.
Naomi Peak: N 41 º 54.68’, W 111º 40.51
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Jul 04 2013
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Temple Fork to Beaver Dams, UT 
Temple Fork to Beaver Dams, UT
 
Hiking avatar Jul 04 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking3.46 Miles 653 AEG
Hiking3.46 Miles   2 Hrs   39 Mns   1.85 mph
653 ft AEG      47 Mns Break
 
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July 4, 2013
Trailhead: Drive sixteen miles up Logan Canyon US-89 to milepost 476, turn right on Temple Fork Road. At .9 miles take the left fork and continue .1 miles to the berm at the end of the gravel road.
Starting Elevation: = 5950’. The common destination is a sawmill which was built in 1877 to provide lumber for the Logan Temple and Tabernacle. The sawmill burned in 1886.
There is little shade along most of the trail. The creek has had several beaver dams.
In June 2001, we noticed the aspen chewed in a beaver-like manner. Then we saw a mound of twigs with a fresh layer of mud drug up from the pond. Then we saw two adult-sized beaver swim out from the mound into the deeper water under the trees along the bank.
In June 2003, we walked to the third beaver dam – it was so tall; it diverts the water from the creek out onto the trail for 200 yards.
In June 2012, there was lots of evidence of recent chewing of the aspen trees; and building of new dams causing flooding of the shady grove of pine trees where I love to rest before returning to the trailhead.
In July 2013, none of the lower dams appeared to be active. Even last year’s dam had been breached. But a new dam has been constructed and is holding water.
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Feb 03 2013
TrekSafari
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Juniper Ridge LoopPayson, AZ
Payson, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 03 2013
TrekSafari
Hiking6.00 Miles 472 AEG
Hiking6.00 Miles   4 Hrs      1.50 mph
472 ft AEG
 
no photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Juniper Trail West Loop
October 2012. Sunday, I returned to Pinedale Road but went south to locate the Juniper Ridge Trail. I drove through the small village and found "Old Highway 260" and headed east to the trailhead for Juniper Ridge Trail. I followed the blue trail markers that were attached to various trees. There was a map at the trailhead that matched my old maps. The first segment of the trail headed due south then curved east. Then it headed north. When it dropped off the ridge, I got confused, so my GPS shows my backtracking to locate the missing blue markers. The trail headed east again. But it was time for me to return to the Chevy. So I walked up to a dirt road. My GPS said go west along the road, so I did. But I left that road for a shortcut along a powerline road. My GPS got me back to the Chevy,
Monday, I returned to the village of Pinedale and continued south to Lewis Canyon Group Campgrounds. From here the General Crook Connector Trail headed due west. I took it from the campgrounds for a brief distance before discovering that the 2002 forest fire destroyed much of the forest here. So I returned to the trailhead and took another segment of the Juniper Ridge Trail. It headed south before crossing the Pinedale Road. Again the trail was blazed with the blue diamond markers. Soon after I walked through a gate (N34.27158, W110.23172), I lost the trail (N34.27110, W110.22807) and decided to use the GPS to return the Pinedale Road and use a direct route to the Chevy. Unfortunately I had to cross a couple of fences. But it was a good walk.
From Show Low drive west on 260; turn onto Pinedale Road; drive south past the small community to a Y in the road. To reach the north trailhead (N34.26272, W110.09975): take a left turn onto Old Hwy-260, the parking lot is on the right. To access the west trailhead (N34.28277, W110.24323): go straight ahead to the Lewis Canyon Group Campgrounds. After checking in with the campground host and drive midway around the outer loop to the small parking lot, the trailhead is on the right.
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Nov 11 2012
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Flume Trail - CCRPPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Nov 11 2012
TrekSafari
Hiking2.50 Miles 190 AEG
Hiking2.50 Miles   2 Hrs   30 Mns   1.00 mph
190 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
The hike started at the main parking area just beyond Ramada #1. We headed east along Slate trail [so named because of the vast amount of slat underfoot) which curves south. The junction with Flume trail is not obvious. The trail wanders along a normally dry rocky wash.
We took the Flume Trail to the Desert Enclave Preserve. We saw evidence of the old flume which brought water from upper Cave Creek to the ranch a portion of which is this Preserve. It was a four mile roundtrip walk. The preserve is nothing exceptional; cactus, creosote brush, Palo Verde trees and the dry Cave Creek bed. The remaining elements of the flume consist of 15" diameter galvanized half-pipes a couple of cement slabs and some timber. The flume 50 years ago was eight feet up off the earth. It is a four mile walk roundtrip. The Flume trail continues towards the west, but it follows an old dirt road.
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1 archive
Jul 15 2010
TrekSafari
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Coldwater Springs Tony Grove Lake, UT 
Coldwater Springs Tony Grove Lake, UT
 
Hiking avatar Jul 15 2010
TrekSafari
Hiking
Hiking
 no routesno photosets
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Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Coldwater Springs Trail from Tony Grove Lake, Northern Region Utah
Thursday June 27, 2013
Trailhead: From Logan drive 28 miles up Logan Canyon US-89 to milepost 480.8 [41°53.071'N, 111°33.812'W], turn left on the seven-mile paved road which ends at Tony Grove Lake.
Hike: Flat walk for first ¾-mile. Gain 810’ in the next mile. 2.5 miles to Overlook which overlooks Tony Grove Lake. Walk across the dam on the east side of the lake, into the pine forest, through the campgrounds, look for the trail to start from the southeast end of the campgrounds.
The trail is in the shade of fir and aspen trees most of the way.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
Look for Glacier Lilies & Western Coneflowers along the upper segment of the trail.
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Feb 28 2004
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 Guides 7
 Routes 24
 Photos 16
 Triplogs 14

male
 Joined Feb 19 2004
 SunCity,AZ
Pass Mountain Loop Trail #282Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 28 2004
TrekSafari
Hiking7.40 Miles 1,020 AEG
Hiking7.40 Miles   3 Hrs   30 Mns   2.11 mph
1,020 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Only Bill and I joined George on this hike. We took the Loop-202 expressway to its eastern termination (for the next three years). At Higley Road we dropped 3 miles south to Brown Road and drove another 8 miles east to Meridian Road. We could have taken the Loop-202 to the Loop-101 to US-60 to Meridian Road. The same driving distance but half as much non-expressway. Access via this trailhead avoids the $5.00 fee at the Usery Mountain County Park.
The information was correct, we found the parking lot at the northern end of Meridian Road. Meridian Road seems to be the division between Maricopa County and Pima County. It would seem to be the division between Apache Junction and Mesa. But it is too far west to be the 111° meridian (it is located about 111° 35.7'W).
From the trailhead there is an obvious path along Pass Mountain 1000' to the northwest. However there are several paths leading from the trailhead towards that path. We took one and came back via another. We walked counter-clockwise around the mountain. It is the typical vegetation for the greater Phoenix area. The weather was still a mite cool for flowers. But the best clumps of flowers were along the north end of the Pass Mountain: pink, gold, blue and white flowers. The California poppies were in bud, ready to bloom soon. The grass along the north west side of the mountain was promising for wild grazing animals, but we did not see any wild animals and few birds.
A group of 15 scouts had spent the night sleeping in tents on the back side of the mountain. The northeast side of the trail has the best view: east to the Superstitions, northwest to Red Mountain, north to the Salt River valley, northeast to the Goldfield Mountains. I was unable to see the Four Peaks because of the air pollution.
After we left the junction to the Wind Cave Trail, we began to see lots of hikers that we had met along trail earlier. It was a total of about 7.5 miles walking from 8:30 to 12:00.
:)
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average hiking speed 1.59 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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