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38 triplogs

Aug 07 2011
TM1ssKDMac
avatar

 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Grizzly Lake 4X4 TrailSouth Central, CO
South Central, CO
4x4 Trip avatar Aug 07 2011
TM1ssKDMac
4x4 Trip2.60 Miles 1,217 AEG
4x4 Trip2.60 Miles   4 Hrs      0.65 mph
1,217 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Grizzly Lake 4X4 Trail was not super high on my list of must do trails for this Colorado outing but it was amazing so I am glad that we did not miss it. The trail head is almost right in the ghost town of St. Elmo so we did not have to travel far to get started. We had my Mom & Step Dad with us for this run and Brandon and Morgan were out hiking when we left camp and did not go on this trail. We found out very quickly that Brandon would not have been able to have taken his FJ up the trail anyway. Right off the bat there is a large step that must be climbed and a stock vehicle will never make it up this step. Brandon's FJ has 3 inch lift and that would not have been enough. Larger tires, lower gears, lockers and some lift... that is the recipe for success on this trail. There is some debate on actual position but this trail is in the top 5 in Colorado for degree of toughness mainly due to the Step and then the steep section.

Just past the trailhead there short side road that leads over to the remains of an old mine that we went and explored before heading on up the trail to Grizzly Lake. Ken went first and had to make about 5 attempts to get his Rubicon up over the step but he finally made it. Mom was riding with him and got out to watch him get up the step. I followed and was able to get up on my first try and we headed up the trail.

I took the lead and we started up a very steep, rocky and loose section of the trail that was rather unnerving to drive up. Traction was poor due to the steepness of the road and the loose gravel and rocks. You had to try to not start spinning or bouncing off the rocks as there was a very sharp drop off to the right that ended at Grizzly Creek a few hundred feet below.

Rick, my step Dad was riding with me and we did a slow crawl up the trail and with the large footprint of my tires we did not have any problems to speak of. I was running with 7 lbs of air in my rear tires and about 9 in the front so I was getting pretty good traction for what the road conditions were. I noticed in my mirror that Ken had fallen behind and when we got to the top I saw that he was kind of sideways on the road an my Mom was out and walking up the hill towards us. I walked down to check out what the problem was and Ken was pretty nervous at the situation his Jeep was in. He had spun out and could not get over a rock that was up against his front right tire. He had tried a couple of times and ended up getting a bit sideways and was not comfortable trying to get it straightened out without a safety line. He has a winch but not trees or good anchor points were nearby so I hiked back up to the P.O.S.T. and put my low gearing to the test. I backed back down the hill using my drivers side mirror to guide me and keep me as close to the high side as possible. Once in place I Killed the engine, set the E brake and chocked the tires. We then hooked up his winch to one of my anchor points and with the winch as a safety line and giving him some help over the rock, he was able to get back on the road where he felt comfortable to continue up the mountain. We got the winch stowed and both of us made it up with no problems this time.

The rest of the road to the lake is great and we cruised right on up. We stopped a few time to check out old cabins and mines and after about an hour we made it to the lake. What a lake!! It was beautiful! :y: Wow I had not expected this. The lake was larger than I had thought and beautiful blue. We got out and spent a little while enjoying the view and then loaded up to head back down the hill to camp.

Our ride all the way down Grizzly Lake Trail was uneventful and the steep section was not a problem going down, you just had to go slow and easy.
Culture
Culture
Mining Equipment
Named place
Named place
Grizzly Lake Mount Mamma
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Aug 06 2011
TM1ssKDMac
avatar

 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Iron Chest 4X4 TrailSouth Central, CO
South Central, CO
4x4 Trip avatar Aug 06 2011
TM1ssKDMac
4x4 Trip2.70 Miles 1 AEG
4x4 Trip2.70 Miles   6 Hrs      0.45 mph
1 ft AEG
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Iron Chest... I had often thought of being able to run this trail but over the years I never dreamed that I would have a vehicle that was up to the task of nailing the Iron Chest. The Iron Chest is often considered the 2nd roughest 4X4 trail in Colorado second only to the Lake Como road up Mount Blanca and it has earned this #2 reputation! What a name... Iron Chest! You need an Iron Chest and large cajones to run this trail! When this road was originally constructed back in the 1870's it was a pretty decent wagon road. Years of neglect following the Iron Chest Mines closing have eroded this wagon road into nothing more than a wash that is full of large rocks for almost a mile and it is now a Mecca to those that want to test the mettle of their rigs. To traverse this road now requires a vehicle that has good ground clearance, low gearing and a tested driver that knows how to maneuver his rig across the rocky trail.

We started out with just the P.O.S.T. and my brothers Rubicon as we knew that Brandon's FJ was not quite up to the task of closing the Chest. That was good for me as it gave me an additional photographer to document the trail and all that we discovered on this day of high country exploration.

The first 3/4 of a mile or so are nothing but a boulder field and progress is slow. Interesting but slow! Having made our way through this first rough section we then easily cruised on up to the mine and spent an hour or so exploring the remains of the Iron Chest mine which lies directly opposite the mountain from the famous Mary Murphy Mine that was one of the main producers of ore for the area during it's heyday.

After exploring the Iron Chest we headed back down the mountain and got to see some deer hanging out at the entrance of another old mine up on the mountain side. Lastly, we stopped and explored the remains of another old mine on the way down and I was amazed at the amount of Iron Pyrite that covered the dump of this old mine. The dump literally sparkled with "gold" as it was covered with nothing but "Fools Gold"! I have never seen this much Fools Gold in one place in all the years I have wandered these mountains. It was amazing!

We finished up the Iron Chest Trail and then headed over to check out some of the Mary Murphy Mines remains before calling it a day, and a good day it had been!!
Named place
Named place
Iron Chest Mine
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Substantial
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Extreme
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Aug 05 2011
TM1ssKDMac
avatar

 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Antero ORV Trails, CO 
Antero ORV Trails, CO
 
4x4 Trip avatar Aug 05 2011
TM1ssKDMac
4x4 Trip9.20 Miles 3,300 AEG
4x4 Trip9.20 Miles   6 Hrs      1.53 mph
3,300 ft AEG
 
1st trip
This was the day that we were going to run the trails up Boulder Peak, Mount Antero, Browns Lake and Baldwin Lakes. We did not get the early start that we needed but headed up the road towards Mount Antero determined to make the best of it!! We turned up the side road towards Boulder Peak and made it all the way to the mine near the top of Boulder Peak, got some great photos looking across the valley towards Mount Princeton and Mount Antero. We then headed down and got back on the road up to Mount Antero and proceeded up the many switchbacks of this road. Near the top we were halted by a traffic jam as a group of jeeps was coming down off of the high point on the mountain. We decided to go over to Mount White and check out the view down into Browns Valley while we waited for traffic to clear up over on Mount Antero.

We had lunch and then headed up to the highest point on Mount Antero that you can drive to now that the traffic had cleared up some. I got some great photos from the top of Antero and then we headed down the mountain. We followed the road down to Brown's Creek and Lake and spent some time down there fishing and shooting photos of the flowers. A rain storm blew in and we packed it up and headed out. On our way out of the valley I was able to capture the most amazing rainbow over the valley as the storm departed down the valley. We later saw some big horn sheep as we crossed the ridge prior to dropping back down off of the side of Mount Antero and into the valley below that holds Baldwin Creek.

We were running short of daylight now and decided not to go up to Baldwin Lakes so I have a great reason to go back sometime to complete this section of the drive. All in all it was a great day in the high Rockies!
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Substantial
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Extreme
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Apr 19 2009
TM1ssKDMac
avatar

 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Tome HillNorth Central, NM
North Central, NM
Hiking avatar Apr 19 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking2.00 Miles
Hiking2.00 Miles   5 Hrs      0.40 mph
 
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Sitting all alone in the Rio Grande Valley just north of Belen is Tome Hill. I ventured out for the afternoon to explore the hill and the history that surrounds it. I started at the parking area just across the street from the start of the south trail up to the summit of Tome Hill. There are several informational plaques located at this parking area that explain the multifaceted history of this lone sentinel near the river of the Rio Grande.

After exploring the interesting statues near the parking area I began the steep climb up to the summit on the south trail. The trail is only about a half mile long but it is steep. You will get a good workout by the time you reach the summit. At the summit there are three large crosses that have been there since the mid 1940's. There is an alter as well and the area is littered with other crosses, tributes & offerings of various sorts. It is very interesting to just walk around and look at all the different items that people have left here.

Walking from the summit to the west down the west trail you reach a flat step just before the hill drops off to the valley floor. On this step are the remains of a small Native American Pueblo. They remains are not very distinct & you will miss them if you don't look close. From these ruins I walked to the north and followed a series of basalt ridges that follow around the north side of Tome Hill. All along this series of rocks are hundreds of petroglyphs. Along the east side of the hill and wrapping around to the south trail is another rocky outcropping that that has hundreds more petroglyphs on all sides of the rocks. You can easily spend hours here searching from all angles for the amazing drawings on the rocks.

The sun set on me as I was just finishing up my search for petroglyphs so I made my way back to the parking area having had a really enjoyable day on a hill that most people drive past every day never knowing about the history and the stories of people long gone that Tome Hill holds.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Mar 31 2009
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Piedras Marcadas Canyon - Petroglyph NMNorth Central, NM
North Central, NM
Hiking avatar Mar 31 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking2.50 Miles 50 AEG
Hiking2.50 Miles   4 Hrs      0.63 mph
50 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Piedras Marcadas Canyon
Petroglyph National Monument

I was en route to Albuquerque on Amtrak with several other railroaders; we were being deadheaded to Belen New Mexico to crew trains moving west out of Belen. We were going to have about 10 hours off before going on duty so I was hoping to spend the afternoon finishing the last section of Piedras Marcadas Canyon that I had not been able to complete the last time that I was there. I had only about half a mile of the canyon to finish and was looking forward to the hike and the petroglyphs.

A friend and fellow engineer, Joe asked if he could tag along. I was glad to have the company. We grabbed my car from the depot parking lot and headed back to Albuquerque and Piedras Marcadas. We parked at a small playground parking area that provides access to the canyon about half a mile south of the main parking area. This put us right at the area that I had previously missed.

We spent about 4 hours hiking up and down the face of the escarpment searching out the petroglyphs and photographing them. We hiked a total of about 2.5 miles along the base of the mesa before we had circled back to the car. I was amazed at the large quantity of petroglyphs in this last section of the canyon. We located hundreds and had a great time. This area of Petroglyph National Monument has the highest concentration of petroglyphs with nearly 5,000 here.
Fauna
Fauna
Jack Rabbit
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Mar 21 2009
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Piedras Marcadas Canyon - Petroglyph NMNorth Central, NM
North Central, NM
Hiking avatar Mar 21 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking4.00 Miles 50 AEG
Hiking4.00 Miles   6 Hrs      0.67 mph
50 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Piedras Marcadas Canyon
Petroglyph National Monument

I drove up from Belen for another visit to Petroglyph National Monument and arrived around noon at the Las Marcadas Parking Area on Jill Patricia Street. The parking area is just behind a Jiffy Lube or something like a Jiffy Lube. There are no fees for this area. The only area where you have to pay a fee is at the Lower Boca Negra Canyon area where a $1 weekday and $2 weekend parking fee is charged by the city of Albuquerque. I grabbed my pack, locked the car and headed up the concrete drainage that runs up beside the home next to the parking area. I followed the trail along the base of the escarpment and started a methodical process of hiking up and down the face of the escarpment carefully checking the boulders for petroglyphs. This greatly increased the length of my hike verses the straight path of the trail along the base of the escarpment but it allowed me to cover the area more thoroughly to view and photograph a larger percentage of the glyphs in this area.

Near the top of the escarpment, about halfway through the hike I was suddenly surrounded by hundreds of honey bees flying all around me. I paused and closely watched them and was able to locate where they were coming from. There were 2 basalt boulders about 20 feet from me and it appeared that the bees were coming from under these rocks. I slowly made my way over to the rocks and was able to look in under them and see a large mass of bees covering a nice piece of honeycomb. There was a small tumbleweed partially blocking my view so I moved it out of the way to lie down on the ground in front of the hive. I slowly crawled up to where my head was about 3 feet from the mass of bees so that I could get some photos of the hive. I was sure glad that I was wearing a bright red T shirt so that I was inconspicuous! :lol:

My father was a bee keeper when I was growing up so I have some prior experience with bees and I was not afraid of them but I did have the question running through my head of whether these bees were of the Africanized variety that have proven dangerous when aroused by intruders. :pray: The bees were passing busily in and out of the opening under the rocks less than a foot from my head and were leaving me unmolested. I returned the favor and just watched for a while and took several photos of the bees before carefully backing up and exiting the area to continue my search for the petroglyphs.

Near the end of the day I surprised a small Cottontail Rabbit under a large boulder. He froze as they will often do if they think you don't see them and I was able to get several good shots of him. He looked like he had, had a close encounter with a coyote or some other predator and he was missing half of one of his ears but seemed to be ok other than that. I also jumped a Jack Rabbit on my way back to the parking area.

After 6 hours of climbing up and down the escarpment face, I was beat and decided to call it a day. I ended up not quite making it all the way to the end of the trail and missed the 6th and last, large concentration of glyphs there. I will return on a later date to complete that section of the hike.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Mar 17 2009
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Elden Pueblo Ruins Loop TrailFlagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 17 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking0.46 Miles 64 AEG
Hiking0.46 Miles   1 Hour      0.46 mph
64 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Elden Pueblo Ruins Loop Trail

I was in Flagstaff for a medical apt. recently and decided to ride my bike back home via Leupp Road for a change of pace. As I rode past Elden Ruins I decided to stop and check out the progress of the dig and restoration project there. I had the place to myself and was surprised at how many new rooms had been excavated since my late visit about 10 years prior. There are still a large number of rooms awaiting excavation but the ruin is looking very impressive.

I had been reading recently about some of the early tribes in the southwest and was amazed to learn that Elden Pueblo consisted of around 70 rooms. I had no idea that it was that large. It was constructed after the Sunset Crater eruption and was a center of trade for the more advanced, post eruption Sinagua.

This short loop hike provides a great view of this ruin that is slowly being reconstructed. The trail has been improved and now has gravel on it. I sat and quietly watched a small bird searching for insects on the bark of the trees nearby. Continuing around the trail I was very excited to find a worn grinding stone with several deep grooves in it near the end of the trail. This short hike was a pleasant diversion and I was glad I decided to stop!
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
1 archive
Mar 16 2009
TM1ssKDMac
avatar

 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Rinconada Canyon - Petroglyph NMNorth Central, NM
North Central, NM
Hiking avatar Mar 16 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking3.00 Miles 77 AEG
Hiking3.00 Miles   5 Hrs      0.60 mph
77 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Rinconada Canyon
Petroglyph National Monument

Having previously explored the two areas at Boca Negra Canyon I was eager to take a look at what Rinconada Canyon had to offer. I was astounded at the huge number of petroglyphs that are in this area and very happy that they are now protected by the NPS. I was to discover on this hike the extent of the damage the petroglyphs have suffered over the last century by vandals who somehow can't see the value in these treasures from the past. Rinconada Canyon has the largest concentration of gunshot damage of any of the monuments areas. I absolutely love to go target shooting but I just cannot comprehend the mental process that would determine that a petroglyph was an acceptable target.

I parked just outside the gates of the parking area because I knew that I would not be out of the canyon before 5 pm when the parking area closed and the gates are locked by the rangers. The trail is easy walking and sandy and mostly level. I proceeded along the base of the escarpment and spent the next 5 hours picking my way through the boulders, searching out the petroglyphs one by one and working my way up to the head of the canyon. Once there I continued along the escarpment base on the trail that follows the south canyon perimeter and made a large loop back to the parking area and my car. Along the way I spotted a couple of cottontails playing among the rocks and got a couple of shots of them.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Mar 13 2009
TM1ssKDMac
avatar

 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Boca Negra Upper Canyon - Petroglyph NMNorth Central, NM
North Central, NM
Hiking avatar Mar 13 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking0.25 Miles 100 AEG
Hiking0.25 Miles   2 Hrs      0.13 mph
100 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Boca Negra Upper Canyon
Petroglyph National Monument

I had enjoyed a couple of hours walking the trails and viewing the petroglyphs in lower Boca Negra Canyon and having completed those trails I hopped in my car to leave. Upon entering the park I had noticed a road that had continued up the hill past the entrance to the lower area. I had no idea that there was a separate area nearby. Not being in a hurry I decided to see where the road went. Arriving at the top of the hill I found a small parking area and a sign indicating that this was Upper Boca Negra Canyon. More Petroglyphs! I parked and found a set of stairs leading down into the small canyon.

I spent the next couple of hours roaming the canyon searching out the petroglyphs hidden there. This was a small section of the park but had several interesting glyphs to check out as well as a scenic view down the canyon and across the valley towards the Sandia Mountains on the opposite side of the valley.

I had a great day and was looking forward to returning in the near future to explore some of the other areas of the monument.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Mar 13 2009
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Boca Negra - Petroglyph National MonumentNorth Central, NM
North Central, NM
Hiking avatar Mar 13 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking1.00 Miles 20 AEG
Hiking1.00 Miles   5 Hrs      0.20 mph
20 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Lower Baca Negra Canyon
Petroglyph National Monument

Stranded at the hotel in Belen after a long train ride from Winslow, I jumped into my old, dented round house car and headed north to Albuquerque and a visit to Petroglyph National Monument. After a short stop at the visitor center, I drove north to the entrance to Baca Negra Canyon. This section of the monument is divided into two areas, the lower area that is described in this hike guide by Page Rob and an upper area of the canyon with a separate parking area a short drive from the main area of Baca Negra.

I hiked the entire trail around the base of the escarpment and climbed to the top of the mesa on the rather rough trail and was really astounded at the large number of petroglyphs located there. The housing subdivisions of Albuquerque are amazingly close to the monument and the petroglyphs. The documentation I received from the visitor center states that there are somewhere between 20 and 25 thousand petroglyphs in the monument.

After closely checking out everything in the lower canyon I drove up the parking area at Upper Baca Negra Canyon, parked and hiked the loop through the canyon. This area is less defined as far as the trail is concerned and you tend to wander randomly among the boulders searching for the drawings. I spent about 5 hours at the monument and had plenty of time to explore both areas of Baca Negra Canyon.

All of the photos posted with this trip log are from the lower canyon area. I will post another trip log with the photos of the upper canyon area later.
wildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observationwildflower observation
Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
1 archive
Feb 26 2009
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Grand FallsNortheast, AZ
Northeast, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 26 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking1.35 Miles 210 AEG
Hiking1.35 Miles   2 Hrs      0.68 mph
210 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Grand Falls

I had been watching the high water flow down the LCR at Winslow for a couple of days and was itching to get out to Grand Falls to get some shots. So I loaded up my bike and went for a ride. It was a beautiful day and I was looking forward to the roaring falls. After a great ride I arrived to be hugely disappointed! The water had not made it to the falls yet. Bummer! (This was just 3 days prior to the day that azpride got those fantastic shots of the falls on the 1st of March) So I took a few shots of the mostly dry falls and then talked to an elderly couple that was there in their motor home. They were planning on heading home that night but when I told them that the water should be there within a day they decided to stay another night.

I wasn't totally disappointed however! The sunset was great and the view of the San Francisco Peaks at sunset from the falls was an angle I had not seen before. So I took the time to shoot a few shots of the peaks as the sun settled behind them. It was a great day all in all.
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Jan 17 2009
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Grandview Trail - Cave of the DomesNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 17 2009
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking6.50 Miles 2,600 AEG
Hiking6.50 Miles   9 Hrs      0.72 mph
2,600 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Departed Winslow at 0530, stopped in Flagstaff to pick up Steve. We arrived at Grandview Point about 0830. Gearing up we headed over the edge and quickly decided that we needed to put on crampons. The trail was very slick and steep.

As we started leveling out and moving away from the south rim out onto Horseshoe Mesa the snow slowly faded away and we had dry trail ahead. Passing the old copper mine and the remains of an old stone house we proceded out onto the west end of Horseshoe Mesa and them turned west and followed a the large gully down to the mouth of the Cave Of The Domes on the west face of the west side of the mesa.

We spent an hour exploring the caverns and then put packs back on and started the long trudge back up to the parking lot at Grandview Point with the the full hearts, heads and tired legs of a day well spent getting back to nature.
Geology
Geology
Curtain Travertine
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Dec 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Red Mountain AKA Gunsite ButtePhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking1.00 Miles 75 AEG
Hiking1.00 Miles   1 Hour      1.00 mph
75 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Enroute back to northern Arizona after a day in the big city. I could not resist stopping and hiking up the hill from hwy 87 and accross the flats towards Red Mountain to capture a few shots of the storm front departing the valley and colored by the setting sun to my back. It was spectacular!!!
Flora
Flora
Teddy Bear Cholla
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Oct 24 2008
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Aravaipa CanyonGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Canyoneering avatar Oct 24 2008
TM1ssKDMac
Canyoneering22.00 Miles 200 AEG
Canyoneering22.00 Miles3 Days         
200 ft AEG
Canyon Hiking - Non-technical; no rope; easy scrambling; occasional hand use
B - Up to light current; wading/swimming; possible wet/dry suit
VI - Two or more days
 no routes
1st trip
Linked linked
Partners none no partners
The air was crisp and hard, winters chilly fingers were tightening their grasp and were reaching deeper into the normally warm deserts of southern Arizona. We remained snug and warm within the confines of the Suburban as we threaded our way along the Klondyke Road as it winds between the Pinaleno (Graham) and Santa Teresa Mountains west of Safford, drawing ever closer to our destination of Aravaipa Canyon. We watched with measured trepidation, the digital readout on the rearview mirror as the outside temperature continued to drop into the mid 30s, well below the mid 50s projected by the weather channel for nighttime lows in the area over the weekend. There were 4 of us along for this wilderness adventure, Hunter, a young teenage friend of the family, Dustin my oldest son, Robert, a friend and school teacher from our little town of Joseph City and myself.

We were planning to camp on Turkey Creek this first night near the east entrance of the Aravaipa Canyon Wilderness area in order to facilitate an early start into the canyon on Friday morning. We had permits for the maximum 3 days allowed by the BLM and had plans to explore and photograph the main canyon and the tributary side canyons comprising the wilderness areas east end. After fording the creek several times we arrived at Turkey Creek and located a spot off of the road near the corral about 1.5 miles up from Aravaipa Canyon. It was after 1:00 am so we opted to just sleep in the Suburban...fun, fun, fun!!!

Day One:

Rising early I walked upstream and located the trail and marker for the small Salado ruin tucked into the cliff on the west side of the canyon. This is a very well preserved ruin and although small it is well worth a look. Here is some of the text from the marker at the ruin:

The Salado first settled in the Tonto Basin in the Superstition Mountains around 1150 A.D. and later occupied a large area of high deserts, mountains, and river valleys. The Salt River, after which the Salado people were named, was the heart of their territory and a major source of water, farmland, and trade routes to other tribes in the area. They had an extensive trade network with the Anasazi to the North, the Mogollon to the East and South, and the Hohokam to the West and Southwest. They were fine craftsmen and produced some of the most exquisite polychrome pottery and intricately woven textiles to be found in the Southwest. For reasons not yet well understood, they disappeared suddenly around 1450 A.D.

This unique cliff dwelling is one of the best preserved of its kind in the Southeastern Arizona. It was likely built around 1300 A.D. by prehistoric Salado people who lived permanently in the nearby Aravaipa Valley. Although they were mainly farmers who grew corn, beans and squash, they used this base camp for hunting and gathering wild plants in Turkey Creek Canyon while their crops matured in the valley. It is likely that a family occupied this house temporarily during certain seasons of the year to utilize the natural resources available in the canyon and the uplands.

This one room structure is ideally situated in an east facing overhang which is sun warmed every morning and shaded after mid-day. It has a low, keyhole shaped entrance facing south and a small window in the east facing roof to conserve heat. The architectural details reflect the materials at hand and ingenuity in incorporating features found in the natural environment. The house was built against the cliff face to which they added walls made with local stone and mud mortar. The sloping roof is made of juniper or sycamore beams interlaced with agave. These were then covered with mud. River water and soil allowed the people to build with mud which absorbs the suns heat to keep the room cool during the day and warm during cold nights.

The Salado harvested a variety of plants for food. Along Turkey Creek and up the canyon slopes they gathered acorns, mesquite bean pods, fruit from the cacti such as prickley pear, seeds from the desert shrubs, various roots, bulbs, and herbs, and the hearts of agave plants which were roasted. Its likely that the Salado hunted mule deer, bighorn sheep, javalina, and small game using a variety of hunting techniques and devices. One of these, the bow and arrow, was adopted by cultures of the Southwest as early as 500 A.D. They also used traps, snares, and nets to obtain fresh fish and meat.


We fixed breakfast and watched with some amusement as, Robert, started removing items from his very heavy pack, trying to decide what he could get along without over the course of the next 3 days: 7 changes of clothes, a roll of bailing wire, large tin of Bag Balm, 5 man tent, 16 knives and a backup, spool of twine, an entire deer made into jerky, 3 pairs of boots and a pipe wrench.

Soooo, how come yer leaving all that important stuff behind?

Well I have bad knees..!! :doh:

Howd that happen?

Not sure, old age I guess.

You ready now?

Yeah, I think I got my pack below 80 pounds now so I should be good. How far did you say to camp?

Oh... about 2.5 miles.

Is there a shuttle?

Ok it wasnt quite that bad and our friend Robert is actually quite the outdoorsman, just not acquainted with the lightweight concept. This weekend was a learning experience for all. And Robert received in good humor more than his fair share of ribbing about what he had in his pack and I must say that it was a pleasant change, having a sink to wash camp dishes in! ;)

We hiked downstream past Parsons Canyon on creek left and then located a campsite on the south side of the creek in the large open area at the confluence of Deer Creek and Aravaipa Creek. We set up camp and then headed down stream to explore Aravaipa between Deer Creek and Booger Canyon and then we climbed, hopped and scrambled up Booger Canyon to the fork and the spring on the east fork of the canyon. Our light was quickly fading at this point so we headed back to camp, arriving just after dark.

Tired, we enjoyed our dinner and a small campfire and then retired early for some well deserved rest.

Day Two:

Following a hot breakfast we began our journey of exploration up Deer Creek which flows through Hell Hole Canyon. Our plan was to hike through the canyon to its junction with the dirt road in Arizona Gulch. We stopped for lunch at the large spring on creek right which I would guess flows about 100 to 150 gallons per minute. While we were stopped at the spring a couple of other hikers came by, also headed up the canyon. After a brief conversation we discovered that we were fellow HAZ contributors. It was a pleasure to meet and chat with Mr. Kanode. His partner and he continued upstream while we continued with our lunch and our more leisurely and in depth exploration of the canyon. We continued up canyon and again met Mr. Kanode and his hiking partner as they came back down the canyon to go home to Phoenix that night. There are several small springs throughout the canyon and water is readily available. Each of them creating their own small eden where the water splashes.

We made it all the way out of the canyon to the road and discovered that there is a ranch located there as well. At the ranch corrals we turned around and headed back down canyon to camp exploring the many side canyons of Deer Creek along the way.

I had read somewhere that the original Salazar homestead of the family that farmed and ranched in the canyon, starting with the arrival in the canyon of Epimenio Salazar in 1865 was located at the confluence of Deer Creek and Aravaipa Creek. One of our goals for this trip was to locate if possible the location of the homestead and see what remains were still in place. The entire area around the confluence of these two creeks is heavily overgrown with mesquite and other vegetation making the search for the homestead location more difficult. As we entered the open area surrounding the confluence of the two creeks we split into two groups and each searched opposite sides of the canyon. We met back at camp and my son Dustin and the other young man with us, Hunter told Robert and myself that they had found the homestead directly opposite the creek from our camp on the north side of Aravaipa creek and up next to the base of the cliffs at the west side of the open area at the confluence. It was getting dark so we delayed our exploration of the homestead site for our last day in the canyon.

Day Three:

After breaking camp we crossed the creek and began our search of the homestead ruins. They are well hidden in the mesquite covering the low bench next to the creek. The main item that remains visible are the fence posts and actual fence lines made from wooden rails. The stock fences were higher and more stoutly built. We located a more decorative style low fence that must have surrounded the house. No obvious remains of the house itself remain and I am sure that at some time or another it burned. We did locate the frame of an old bed that probably still rests where it did in a bedroom of the home that used to shelter it.

I have located a text that contains the story of Rosalia Salazar Whelan who was the daughter of Epimenio Salazar. She was born on February 4, 1904 at this homestead in Aravaipa Canyon. This text is her story about life in the canyon while she was growing up there in the early part of the 20th century.

"My name is Rosalia Salazar Whelan. I was born on February 4, 1904 at my parent's home in Aravaipa Canyon. My fathers name was Epimenio Salazar. He was born in Oposura, Sonora, Mexico. He was a full-blooded Opata Indian. My mother's nave was Crespina Lopez de Salazar. She was born at Estacion Llano, Sonora, Mexico, in about 1873. She and one of her sisters-my Tia Carmen- came with their grandmother Rufugia-Dona Cuca to Arizona when they were very young children.

After my father and mother were married they went and lived in Aravaipa Canyon. My father had gone to Aravaipa Canyon looking for work. He worked as a cowboy there with a man named John Dunlap. I think that is when he claimed his land there. (Family sources set the date of Epimenios arrival in Aravaipa Canyon as 1865)

My father was one of the first people to settle in Aravaipa Canyon, but later there were other families too, mostly Mexicanos, old families that had been there for a long time. There were some Americanos too, but just a few.

My father had a cattle ranch in El Canyon and a farm. He had a lot of land there. He kept most of his cattle in another place down below the canyon, towards the mountains. They called it "El Campo de Caballos." Later the Anglos named it Horse Camp. In those days the land was not fenced; it was all open range. All the rancheros and vaqueros in the area would gather the cattle during roundup and there would be thousands of cattle together in one place. Then they would drive the cattle to Willcox and ship them from there. It took them four days to drive the cattle that far.

My brother Guadalupe used to take care of my fathers cattle at El Campo de los Caballos. From the time he was very small my father taught him how to ride a horse. All of us girls also learned to saddle and ride a horse at a very early age. But in those days one didn't wear pants; we wore skirts and rode sidesaddle. We called the sidesaddle "el albordon."

We had quite a few horses as well as the cattle. We had quarter horses for working the cattle and another kind of horse for the tiros - the teams that pulled the wagons. My father had four teams of horses for the wagons for the farm to haul wood, the harvest to the barn, the grain and hay for the animals and to carry provisions from Willcox. I and sometimes my sister Lucia, used to go with my father once a year to get supplies, the staples that we did not grow ourselves. It took two days to get to Safford and three days to get to Willcox. Toditito el dia en el sol. (all the long day in the sun.) We camped by the side of the road.

It may be true that my sisters and I worked harder than the daughters of our neighbors. My parents had only one son, and as my brother Guadalupe got married very young, we had to fill in and do the work of men.

Sometimes when I am sitting around and talking about those days to my friends that are my age, they say they don't believe me, that it is not possible that women did such work! I tell them "It is true! When you have to, you have to! What you are taught, you learn!" But sometimes I stop to think and remember, and I say to myself, "How did we do it?" I remember nights when we would go to bed and I didn't know whether or not I'd be able to sleep from weariness.

From the time we were very young we had our chores, there is always so much work to do on a farm. When we were small, one of our jobs was to bring in kindling at night for the morning fire. We had to get up at 4:30 or 5:00, and who at that hour is going to go outside and gather kindling? We had to milk the cows before we went to school, and then we walked to school. It was a couple of miles from our house over there by the T-Rail Ranch. We had a clock - do you know what that clock was? We'd hear my father make a sound - hrrumph, hrrumph, hrrumph. And we knew it was time to get up, because we had to take him his coffee to bed before we went outside to start our chores. He was the boss alright...

As we got older we had other jobs as well. We washed. We ironed. We worked in the milpa. We picked fruit and vegetables. My mother worked very hard. It was enough work just with the large family she had. She was always tending to the kitchen, not only to cook for our family but for the men that came to help my father.

My mother made her tortillas medium sized. Smooth and even she used to say, "You girls never learned to make tortillas the right way. Except for your older sister, Pastora. She makes them like I do." Sometimes she even made tortillas from the wheat we grew on the farm. We'd grind the flour ourselves on the metate.

You know, I get to thinking. I say to myself, "Todo se acaba." ("Everything comes to an end.") When you get older you don't do things the way you used to when you were young. My sisters and I used to make lots of tortillas, piles of them, because when you go out to work in the fields you don't have time to come in and make them at midday.

My mother sewed for us. She mended. She patched. She made us our underwear from manta cloth. And our blouses and skirts and house dresses. She had a treadle machine, and she ordered material from a catalog. She even bought our shoes that way. Every once in a great while she bought us a ready made dress. When we needed a little better dress, Tia Carmen made it for us, but don't think for a minute that we had many clothes.

My father had a didho (proverb) "Remember it is not a sin to be poor, but to be dirty, heaven forbid!) My sisters and I had the chore of the washing and the ironing. It was a lot with that big family. We washed twice a week. And all on the washboard. We gathered wood and made a big fire and hauled water. We boiled the clothes and them added more hot water and rinsed everything twice. There were so many clothes to hang that we even had to drape them over the branches of the mesquites. And then we used those heavy irons made out of cast iron. We'd put them on the wood stove to heat. My mother helped with the folding and ironing the dish towels. We'd also wash and iron for some of the Americans, wives of the ranchers who lived in El Canyon, to earn a little extra spending money. There were times when I would iron from seven o'clock in the morning until five o'clock in the afternoon. When it was cold, we'd find a spot of sun to warm our backs; and when it was hot we'd look for a bit of shade to cool us."



We began our exit of the canyon, hiking upstream and enjoying our last day in the beauty of this wonderful place. Upon our arrival at the entrance to Parsons Canyon we delayed our exit and hiked up Parsons Canyon about a mile and then returned back to our packs and continued our trek out the Suburban and our trip home. I hope you enjoy the photos of the canyons we explored and take the time to visit in person sometime.
Geology
Geology
Natural Arch
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Light
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Wildflowers Observation Light
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Oct 12 2008
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
West Fork Oak Creek Trail #108Sedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 12 2008
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking10.00 Miles 800 AEG
Hiking10.00 Miles   7 Hrs      1.43 mph
800 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
West Fork Oak Creek

Following a rather cold motorcycle ride from Joseph City on the morning of October the 12th 2008, my daughter Morgan and I arrived at the parking area and fee station for the West Fork of Oak Creek. The parking area was already almost full. The first frost of the season had darkened the leaves on the trees nearby. There were quite a few people milling about, gathering hiking gear and photography equipment from trunks and back seats for the hike up the canyon. This was Morgan and my first visit to this canyon and while I was disappointed in the large number of people we were seeing, I was looking forward to seeing the canyon that I had heard and read so much about.

We headed down the trail through the old apple orchard and spent some time wandering through the ruins of the old lodge and out-buildings at the mouth of the canyon. The remains of the old fireplace were very cool! If only those rocks could tell the tales of years gone by and the stories of people who had warmed cold bones in front of countless crackling and popping fires laid upon its hearth over the years…

We started down the trail and quickly found out why this canyon is such a popular destination. The leaves on the trees were starting to turn and the canyon was ablaze with color and filled with the happy voices of those who had ventured out to see the sights Mother Nature had in store for them. The gently flowing stream formed countless reflecting pools and magnified the beauty of the Eden like setting.

Shooting photos without people in them proved to be very challenging, but not impossible. Morgan and I continued along the trail and stream, enjoying every twist, turn and new view the canyon offered. After hiking upstream for a couple of hours we arrived at the end of the trail where the canyon narrows down and requires wet feet of those that continue on via the canyon bottom. There were several people there resting and talking prior to beginning their decent out of the canyon. We were quickly informed that we had made it to the end of the canyon and must turn back at this point. Morgan and I just looked at each other and smiled! We were at the end of the crowds not the end of the canyon! We chose not to get wet and quickly climbed up above the canyon bottom on creek left and bypassed the narrow pool that halted the less adventurous at it’s edge. In about a hundred yards we found a route back down to the bottom of the canyon and continued upstream, alone now as the quiet of the now much less populated canyon enveloped us.

We continued on for about another 2 miles before the time and Morgan’s wisdom overcame my desire to continue pushing forward to see what was around the “next” bend! We headed down canyon back to our 2 wheeled ride home through a still beautiful canyon that was now mostly our own to enjoy.
Flora
Flora
Bigtooth Maple
Fauna
Fauna
Canyon Tree Frog
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Substantial
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Wildflowers Observation Moderate
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Kelly D. McLaughlin
2 archives
Jun 28 2008
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Mt Bross 4X4 Road, CO 
Mt Bross 4X4 Road, CO
 
4x4 Trip avatar Jun 28 2008
TM1ssKDMac
4x4 Trip15.00 Miles 1,500 AEG
4x4 Trip15.00 Miles1 Day         
1,500 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
We made this trip up the side of Mt Bross, which rises to the north west of the small mining town of Alma Colorado. We were here for the occasion of a memorial for my father who had grown up in Alma. We paused just outside of Alma on the road up Buckskin Gulch near the old townsite of Buckskin Joe where Alma's cemetery is located in a grove of aspen and pine. Continuing up Buckskin Gulch we again stopped at the old mill that still stands next to Buckskin Creek and spent a few moments looking around again and seeing what had changed since our last visit.

Just past the mill we turned right on the road that curls around the base of Mt Bross to the east and arrived at the old miners cabin where we planned to camp for a couple of nights prior to the memorial on Sunday. This cabin still stands and is used by all and maintained by those that use it. No reservations, no cost, first come first serve with just the request that you do a little maintenance on the cabin to keep it viable. It has many comforts left by the many visitors to use it for shelter. My wife and I and our grandaughter took the cabin and the others in our group pitched tents and a couple used the other small cabin that sits nearby.

The following day we made a trip back down the mountain and up the road past Park City to drive the 4X4 road of Mosquito Pass that used to be the route of travel to the town of Leadville and is the highest vehicular pass in North America at 13,185 feet. Near the top you circle around London Mountain The road goes right past the North London Mine where my dad's uncle was working when he suffered a compound fracture from being caught in a cave in of the mine. He survived the accident but could never walk right again and this ended his days of being able to do the hard labor of a miner. He fell back on natural ability with numbers and started doing the books for various business around town. His brother, my grandfather started his mining career around on the other side of the mountain at the South London Mine. It was later that he leased and worked the Mineral Park Mine.

On Sunday we left camp at the cabin and headed farther up the side of Mt Bross towards the bristlecone pine area at Windy Ridge on the east flank of Mt Bross. We paused to let every one look at the ruins of the Mineral Park Mine and it's cabin where our grandfather lived and worked underground during the winters of 1946 - 1949. My dad would often spend part of his christmas break here with my Grandfather, playing around the compressor room and winch house while his father was down below pulling gold ore out of the mountain. During the summers my Grandfather, my Dad and his brother worked the entire valley cutting logs and skidding them out of the forest to be hauled to town by my grandfather to be cut into lumber at his small sawmill there. He would then make occasional trips to Denver to sell the lumber and then haul bags of coal back to sell to the residents of the valley for their stoves.

We continued on for a short distance and arrived at Windy Ridge where our trip ended due to the road being blocked still by heavy snow. We had hoped to make it all the way to the top of Mt Bross where my Grandmothers remains are scattered but was not to be this trip. The road was still snowed over just below Windy Ridge. We walked up to Windy Ridge and held a celebration of my Dad's life looking down on the town of Alma where he spent his childhood.

A great couple of days enjoying the Colorado mountains that I grew up in.
foliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observationfoliage observation
Autumn Foliage Observation Substantial
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Wildflowers Observation Substantial
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Kelly D. McLaughlin
Jun 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Balanced Rock, Arches N. P., UT 
Balanced Rock, Arches N. P., UT
 
Hiking avatar Jun 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking2.00 Miles 100 AEG
Hiking2.00 Miles   2 Hrs      1.00 mph
100 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Parking near the balanced rock of the main road in Arches National Park, we hiked overland around the balanced rock and the various formations nearby. Arches is truly a great place to visit. One of the formations reminds me of "Thing" from the Fantastic Four with a huge version of Tweedy Bird facing him! Well, I guess I have been looking at rocks to long!
Geology
Geology
Natural Arch
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Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Jun 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
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 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Park Avenue, Arches N. P., UT 
Park Avenue, Arches N. P., UT
 
Hiking avatar Jun 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking1.00 Miles 500 AEG
Hiking1.00 Miles   2 Hrs      0.50 mph
500 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Park Avenue is near the entrance to Arches National Park and is a wonderful area of balanced rocks, spires and narrow combs. The size of some of these are huge. Compare the size of some of the hikers on the trail in relation to the towering comb. The short trail winds down through the valley and comes back out to the main road near the formations of The Three Gossips and the Tower of Babel. This is a very cool hike.
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Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Jun 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
avatar

 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Devils Garden, Arches N. P., UT 
Devils Garden, Arches N. P., UT
 
Hiking avatar Jun 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
Hiking2.00 Miles 300 AEG
Hiking2.00 Miles   2 Hrs   30 Mns   0.80 mph
300 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
Devils Garden is a beautiful hike through the middle of lots of steep ridges of vertical combs of sandstone. The trail winds along and takes you to several arches in the sandstone combs. The sun was setting so we did not have time complete the entire trail and had to turn around at Landscape Arch.
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Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
Jun 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
avatar

 Guides 9
 Routes 10
 Photos 4,110
 Triplogs 38

57 male
 Joined Apr 15 2004
 Joseph City, Ari
Fins & Things 4X4 RoadSoutheast, UT
Southeast, UT
4x4 Trip avatar Jun 26 2008
TM1ssKDMac
4x4 Trip13.00 Miles 300 AEG
4x4 Trip13.00 Miles   4 Hrs      3.25 mph
300 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
Partners none no partners
From our camp along the Colorado River My brother Ken, my nephew Josh and my son Brandon and I departed for a run on the famous Moab 4X4 trail called "Fins & Things". Located within the pay use area of Sand Flats just east of downtown Moab.

On this trail I left my Suburban back at camp and the four of us made the run in my brothers highly modified Jeep Rubicon. Through the majority of this run I either rode on top the roof rack or stood alongside the trail when it was not safe to be on the roof. From these vantage points I recorded the our traverse of the trail with my camera. From downtown Moab the route runs for about 25 miles with 13 miles being off pavement.
Culture
Culture
HAZ Rides
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Wildflowers Observation Isolated
_____________________
Kelly D. McLaughlin
2 archives
average hiking speed 0.85 mph
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WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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