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17 triplogs

Apr 19 2008
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Boulder Canyon Loop from First Water THPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 19 2008
tinyelvis
Hiking11.30 Miles 1,560 AEG
Hiking11.30 Miles   5 Hrs   30 Mns   2.05 mph
1,560 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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The best way to approach this loop is via Second Water trailhead, thereby doing the loop clockwise. We hit the trail at about 7:30 and the TH was packed. Most folks seem to do the Black Mesa loop though.
It will take you about a half hour or less to encounter the Black Mesa loop TH marker. Keep walking straight on 2nd Water and take the trail further into the canyon. Things get a little rocky here, but nothing too unstable. Flora changes quickly as you approach bottom of canyon with green palo verdes and even some pools and springs of minimal water still visible. Once you pass the Black Mesa TH, you'll probably head for another 45 minutes before you encounter the Boulder Canyon TH marker.
Head right, thereby heading up the boulder canyon wash you have suddenly encountered.
There is no running water in the canyon right now, but several pools of water throughout the entire hike - some less green than others. Regardless the dog with us loved them. As a side note, dogs love this hike, but it's getting a little too hot and it's just a matter of weeks before a dog would burn its paws out here. The dog we took hasn't moved off my kitchen tile in the past two hours.
We talked to a couple of other folks who said there was running water up to their knees about a month ago. Not so today as we were able to walk directly up the canyon. This is fun, but can be grueling on your ankles.
Look for the trail that runs predominantly on the left side of the canyon for the first half of the hike, steadily marked by cairns.
From there you;ll head another 1.5 to 2 hours, ziging and zagging through the boulders occassionally losing, and then finding the trail. But don't worry because there's plenty of cairns to help guide you if you get a little confused at some point. Just keep heading up the canyon.
Eventually you'll get out of the canyon, but not before passing Calvary Trail. You'll see it in front of you when you're coming out of the canyon in front of you, ascending the mountain to a saddle at a steep angle. Don't worry. You don't have to take thast trail. Once you hit Calvary TH marker, you've completed a little more than half of the hike up Boulder Canyon.
There's one point where things get a little tricky because the canyon starts to open to the right but you can go straight up the canyon and continuing bouldering, almost as if you were walking towards the Needle, but you'll want to veer right once the mountain that has been at your right side the whole time starts to decline. You'll see the cairns.
We left the Dutchamn / Boulder Canyon TH marker at 11:30 after eating a light lunch.
From here head right on the Dutchman TH and you're on your way home. The Dutchamn section of the trail does take a little longer than you're kind of expecting (at least that which I had mentally prepared myself for, or expected), but it's fairly level, there's no rocks or pieces to step on, and several portions of the trail are solid rock so it's easy to walk on. You;ll ascend for a bit and then suddenly you'll start going downhill after about about an hour. You;ll know when the pint I;m talking about because it's pretty much all downhill from here.
We reached the Second Water / Dutchman junction (where our journey began) at about 12:45.
From there it takes about 5 minutes to reach the First Water parking lot.

Would not recommend this hike in a matter of weeks or if you don't get started before 8am. We were blessed with a nice breeze and clouds today.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Apr 12 2008
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Black Mesa Loop - Superstition MtnsPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 12 2008
tinyelvis
Hiking9.00 Miles 1,125 AEG
Hiking9.00 Miles   4 Hrs      2.25 mph
1,125 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Love this hike. I prefer to go counter-clockwise. It's helpful to ask people doing the same loop (heading the other way) what time they left the parking lot as well in order to gather a perspective as to how you're doing on timing.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Jul 03 2005
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
West Fork Oak Creek Trail #108Sedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
Hiking avatar Jul 03 2005
tinyelvis
Hiking4.00 Miles 200 AEG
Hiking4.00 Miles   8 Hrs      0.50 mph
200 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Last time I hit the West Fork up it was January and the water was up to my stomach and running about 38 degrees. Oh what a difference 5 months and a couple of seasons makes. Specifically, about 31 degrees water temperature.

First of all--suggestions. TEVAS, TEVAS, TEVAS. Don't forget socks to avoid blisters. If you are coming from Phoenix, and you are going to do this in the summer when Sedona is jam-packed and you have to navigate through the 179, and then eventually through downtown (and you're in a hurry and you've seen the drive through Sedona hundreds of times and you want to avoid crowds...), I would suggest heading up the I-17, past the Sedona exit (179) and going all the way to the 89 A. When you get to the 89, head south on the 89 and you'll be at the West Fork trailhead (on your right heading south) in 10 mins. You do add miles to the journey going this way, but you avoid the crowds and the slow lines of "rubber-neckers." The 89 south was backed up from Slide Rock to the downtown at 6pm on July 3rd.

Also, if this is the only hike you plan to do for the day, don't make the mistake of buying a red rock pass because you're going to have to pay the $7 entry fee to get in regardless. Finally, if you're going to do this on the weekend, make sure you get to the trailhead by 10am as the parking is limited to about 50 cars.

Do some research on the area before taking the hike, particularly the old lodge ruins near the beginning of the trail. Several presidents stayed here, Hollywood actors, and even Zane Grey while he wrote his masterpiece "Call of the Canyon." it could easily be surmised that much of the work in the "Call" was inspired by the very hike you are about to trek.

This time of year, it's more fun to hike in the creek as opposed to next to it. Depending on how much time you want to spend in the canyon... If you don't have as much time, and want to see as much as possible, use the trail for the first 2 miles + or so, crossing the creek occassionally but staying within the trees for most of the hike, and then getting "wet" towards mile 3 and beyond. You really don't have a choice to stay dry a little beyond three miles. (the forest service is doing a lot of work to repair the trail from mile 2 to 3 due to the recent floods back in Decemberish).

HOWEVER, if you have time, I would recommend hiking up the creek (in the water) for the majority of your hike in (especially if you have a dog). It will take longer, and make your legs a little more tired at the end of the day, but you get to see so much more and experience so much more of the pristine wilderness this way. And, you can think of all those poor bastards 5 miles down the road at Slide Rock swimming in crowded water with God knows what floating past them. Then, take the trail on your way out and you'll be surprised how quickly you make it back to the parking lot.

This may be the "most popular" trail in Sedona, but once you get to 2 miles and beyond, you start seeing fewer and fewer faces. And try to time your hike so that you are leaving around 3 to 4 pm or as the sun is setting. The canyon is most impressive and effective with your camera with the late afternoon light / shadows.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Jan 23 2005
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
West Fork Oak Creek Trail #108Sedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 23 2005
tinyelvis
Hiking2.00 Miles 200 AEG
Hiking2.00 Miles
200 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Second week in a row that I headed out to the West Fork. Still cold. IN fact, due to increased run-off, the water is acutally colder.

The water level was about up to the knees in most crossings, and snow and ice still dot the landscape; particularly the further west you move up the canyon.

We were better prepared this time; towels, sandals, extra socks--although I later came to find that it was just easier to cross the creek with no sandals rather than take off my boots, put sandals on, cross creek, take off sandals, dry off feet, put back on boots...not to mention saved a lot of time the more we did this.

Not another soul on the trail...Sounds of rushing creek, bright red sandstone, water and ice everywhere...

I did it in shorts and I was never cold. Just remember the towel.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Jan 16 2005
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
West Fork Oak Creek Trail #108Sedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 16 2005
tinyelvis
Hiking1.50 Miles 200 AEG
Hiking1.50 Miles   1 Hour      1.50 mph
200 ft AEG
 no routes
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Snow still on the ground and water was way too cold to go too far. Icicles on mountain faces, dead trees frozen in the water, water level very high rushing all around, life everywhere. Rocks too frozen for rock-hopping. It was great! Bring some waterproof boots or galoshes, and you'll get far.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Jan 15 2005
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Reavis Ranch via 109 NorthGlobe, AZ
Globe, AZ
Hiking avatar Jan 15 2005
tinyelvis
Hiking3.00 Miles 2,040 AEG
Hiking3.00 Miles   2 Hrs      1.50 mph
2,040 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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Started the hike late after spending day along highway 88. Came just a little short of the falls, but spectacular views and green EVERYWHERE!!!
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Dec 17 2004
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Flatiron Hike - SuperstitionsPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Dec 17 2004
tinyelvis
Hiking5.40 Miles 2,780 AEG
Hiking5.40 Miles
2,780 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Hiked with "Mad Filipino" Army guy in town from Iraq. For the next TWO days, the outside of my thighs hurt like never before.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Oct 23 2004
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Second Water Trail #236Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Oct 23 2004
tinyelvis
Hiking3.50 Miles 368 AEG
Hiking3.50 Miles
368 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
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Sarted on trailhead at 5:30. Very dark, very quickly.

But, thanks to the nearly full moon very easy to find the trail.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Aug 28 2004
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
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40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Dutchman Trail #104Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Aug 28 2004
tinyelvis
Hiking8.00 Miles
Hiking8.00 Miles   5 Hrs      1.60 mph
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
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Well, after looking at Matt's pictures of the hike, I am fully-confident that I will return to do this hike in the winter or spring, or fall...just not the SUMMER.

Started out at 8am on a warm day without a cloud in the sky. Oh yeah, started from the 1st Water TH and continued along Dutchman #104. If you're looking for shade along this trail, you won't find very much beyond the initial 3/4 mile.

We passed the Second Water TH and eventually went just past the Black Mesa TH before I decided that blurry vision and heat swells probably weren't a good thing. This hike would have been best (in the summer) had I been on the trail about 6:30. But the last 2.5 hours of the hike were done in 104 degree weather and everyone knows that 104 feels like 110 in the Superstitions, etc.

There are some great rock formations along this trail and it's really very interesting to see the Superstitions from a different viewpoint. The best part about this trail is that it is EASY. And I don't mean North Mountain easy, but stroll easy.

It takes about 2.3 miles to reach Parker Pass and you do this at a gradual ascension. Then, you start doing a gradual descent into the drainage basin of the surrounding canyons. Weaver's Needle will be ever-present the majority of the hike, peeking back and forth through the other mountains.

The geology isn't as grand as other areas of the Supersitions (Lost Dutchman Park, Peralta) but this is also one of the easiest trails in relation to length that I have found in the Superstitions. Granted, I came at it from the easier way (I think), so I'd be interested to see how it is starting from Peralta. All I could think of is how I want to come back when the weather is better and the flowers in season. We ate a lot on this hike but I honestly had difficulties finding a shaded spot to enjoy my sandwich, but then again I was in the basin for the most part.

The best part about this trail (other than being easy) is that it provides many options for extending your hike or varying your direction(s). Recommended that you do some basic research and trail familiarizing before heading out on this trek if you wish to maximiza choices. Otherwise, just follow Dutchman and you're set.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
May 29 2004
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Flatiron Hike - SuperstitionsPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar May 29 2004
tinyelvis
Hiking4.80 Miles 2,780 AEG
Hiking4.80 Miles   5 Hrs      0.96 mph
2,780 ft AEG
 no routes
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Began hike at about 8:30. Three of us ventured, one of us had some major vomit and exhaustion problems. Sorry, didn't get a picture of that. Began at the Saguaro Day-use Area Treasure Loop trail to Jacob's Crosscut and then trekked to Siphon Draw trail. Interesting alternative to hike with little distance added.
Anyway, he stuck with it, made it to the top thanks to multiple shade spots along the trail and a pack of Barnum's Animal Crackers.
The trail is a little steep and rockey in the basin and continues until you enter the mouth of the canyon leading up to Flatiron. Nothing too bad here but things get a little more difficult when you reach Siphon Draw and begin the Flatiron ascent. A believe Flatiron is about another mile from here and most of this climb is made through canyons, similar to Peralta but steeper and more narrow.
No more Randy Johnson figure up top. Perhaps he simply exlploded after completing his perfect game in some sort of sacrificial act of the gods. I did find his left thigh and his right Nike sneaker however.
Very hot returning, wish we were on the trailhead earlier.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Feb 14 2004
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
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40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Dripping Springs - Grand CanyonNorthwest, AZ
Northwest, AZ
Hiking avatar Feb 14 2004
tinyelvis
Hiking6.32 Miles 1,500 AEG
Hiking6.32 Miles   9 Hrs      0.70 mph
1,500 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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I can't find a specific reference on the Grand Canyon website, but Hermit Rd is actually open to all cars at this time of year. Between the months of May and September, day hikers must park at the Grand Canyon Village and ride the free shuttle out, but the gate is opened to all traffic during this time of year. This is extremely nice as the trailhead for Dripping Springs/Hermit Trail is quite a drive along Hermit Rd. and it takes sometime to get their via tram.
Starting out at the Hermit trailhead, we headed through scattered ice and snow 3.25 miles to dripping springs. nice mixture of snow and ice on shaded sides of canyon, a little muddy at times. Their is a huge rock cathedral wall that shelters out much of the sun for the day along many segments of this hike. I was not even cold either, hiking mostly with sleeves rolled up on my thin layered shirt.
Drippings Springs was not in the best shape, but spring was falling at a steady rate. It's kind of cool when you first start hearing the echo of the water dropping into the spring from a distance. Must have scared Boucher the first time he wondered if he was alone in the canyon or not. The wooden sign was off in a corner broken at the base and some rocks around the spring had been knocked down or scattered. We did our best to repair aesthetics of site, but it doesn't look like many people visit during this time of year. Didn't see one person on the trail. I placed a water bottle under the springs and it filled up to the top of the label in about 1 hour if that gives you any kind of sense of the rate of the spring. Mind you, that was tiny dropplets falling into a hole the sze of a nickel.
It was still really quiet and peaceful though and made an excellent site for lunch. The spring(s) is located in a secluded canyon off towards your left when you first begin your hike. you can actually see the dark water spots streaking down the canyon walls from a distance if you know where you're supposed to look. The nice thing about dripping springs is that it is an "up and down" hike with a lot of up. it's surprising how far you hike back and down the canyon, and then back up once you near the spring. Point being that this is a nice reward as you do a lot of "down" after time spent at spring. You can continue on the Dripping Springs trail, but this takes you back up to the top of the canyon.

We then hiked 1.75 miles back to the hermit trail junction and then another 2.25 miles to santa maria spring. santa maria spring isn't really much of a spring. it's more like a trough. a gross trough. you'll also find Hermit's rest, or wooden shelter, whatever you want to call it. a nice place to beat the heat, rest, write graffiti.
we went down probably a few more miles to lookout point and took in some final views. headed back up the way we came. excellent hike and a way to see the canyon without committing yourself to bottom. probably about 10-13 miles total for the day.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Jun 08 2003
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Cave Trail #233Phoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar Jun 08 2003
tinyelvis
Hiking5.00 Miles 1,400 AEG
Hiking5.00 Miles   4 Hrs      1.25 mph
1,400 ft AEG
 no routesno photosets
1st trip
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Ascended trail via Bluff Springs. Didn't get on trailhead until 11am in 110+ weather. The trail ascends at a very rapid rate and Peralta will sink further and further into the canyon by the minute. There is little shade and it felt good to rid my body of toxins from the previous nights beer frenzy. Once the trail levels out the terrain changes to a moon-like landscape with amazing neon colored moss and lichen. Geronimo's Cave appears shortly in the distance and a little bit of rock scrambling will have you there in no time.
Spent a great deal of time inside of cave eating lunch and recharging for remainder of trip. The birds love to hangout around this area and it's awesome to lay in the cave and just watch and listen to the hawks soar through the canyon with relative ease. The wind is usually mildly strong up here as well and provides excellent natural cooling.
At this point, you continue on to join Freemont Saddle. I prefer to use my altitude/height difference to my advantage rather than join the Peralta trail. By walking along the "spine," you will come up to the Peralta trail about 20 feet higher than the Saddle and eventually come to one of many areas to descend below.
Followed Peralta down for speed and shade. Not a person seen on entire trip.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
May 04 2003
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Flatiron Hike - SuperstitionsPhoenix, AZ
Phoenix, AZ
Hiking avatar May 04 2003
tinyelvis
Hiking4.80 Miles 2,780 AEG
Hiking4.80 Miles   7 Hrs      0.69 mph
2,780 ft AEG
 no routes
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Not quite sure what canyon I ended taking up. I actually veered right of the canyon and took a ridge up to the top. The incline was excruciating at points. Went too far and too high to the right to join up with trail. I think I made the error at a cave when I took a break by going up and around cave (via ridge) as opposed to down below. Oh well.
Wildflowers are almost gone, but hike is still the most rewarding in the Superstitions.
Look for Randy Johnson at the top.??
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Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Apr 14 2003
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
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40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Palatki RuinsSedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
avatar Apr 14 2003
tinyelvis
 no routes
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_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Apr 03 2003
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
 Photos 125
 Triplogs 17

40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Palatki RuinsSedona, AZ
Sedona, AZ
Hiking avatar Apr 03 2003
tinyelvis
Hiking4.00 Miles
Hiking4.00 Miles
 no routes
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The following served as the summary for Palatki/Honanki Indian Ruins from 2003-04-03 to 2008-01-31

I don't think either of these can be accurately described as a "hike." It's really more of a stroll. Short hikes at both sites - less than a mile each. Therefore, I present them as one.

Palatki is nestled at the base of the Red Rock, a site homesteaded and maintained by former frontiersmen after the various bands and tribes of Indians left. The first thing you will notice when arriving at Palatki is an older residence, rusted farming equipment and a dead orchard. There are two different trails: one leads to the right and takes you to multi-leveled cliff dwellings. I found it fascinating that you can still see the original wood beams in certain parts of the frame. You are allowed to enter the dwellings! While there is another story above you, you will find (in talking to Rangers) there used to be many levels. Interestingly, the red rock/dirt that you are standing on is actually the remnants of those former levels.

The other trail is closer to the entrance of Palatki, and goes off to the left. This takes you to another base of a mountain, a natural overhang, "shelter" overhead. This part of Palatki is where you will find the petroglyphs/pictographs. This is an unbelievably active site with artwork everywhere. Nothing is too intricate, but plenty of quantity to keep you amazed. Notice the picture of Renee with the dark rock and the girls with ponytails in the back. These are known as "Hopi girls" I believe, and are identified by their large hair dresses.

Honanki is a sacred Sinagua cliff-dwelling site with plenty of pictographs and intact dwellings. The 700 year old ruins are well-preserved and relatively not crowded. The rock art on the walls is fascinating. It's easier to get too, free, and is often visited by Sedona Jeep tours (a la Pink Jeep). Honanki is a more intricate building site, with more intact structures (there was also a much larger population here). A great deal of the site is fenced off from visitors (due to deterioration), but you can still explore the site very intimately. Last time I was there, they were doing some major restoration, so the wooden fence may be gone now. You'll be amazed at how well constructed this site is, how smooth the corners are, not to mention how well the native people used their natural environment/surroundings in creating their home(s). There are plenty of pictographs. Look for the picture of me doing my best "Air Jordan" impersonation next to Michael's ancient-Indian predecessor.

Both of these sites should not be missed when visiting Sedona, especially for those history-oriented adventurers. While in the area there's plenty of mountain biking nearby. This is also a good entrance or exit journey while heading to Loy Canyon.

Dry Creek Road is paved past the junction with Boynton Pass Road. Boynton Pass Road is paved for a short distance until it makes a sharp left turn and becomes a rough dirt road. Watch for the signs. The road to Palatki is rough but passable by all cars (if cautiously driven) in good weather. On the other hand, the road to Honanki is very rough and a high clearance vehicle is required. During foul weather travel on the roads should be limited to four-wheel drive vehicles.
_____________________
Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
Mar 30 2003
tinyelvis
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 Guides 3
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40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Lava River Cave TubeFlagstaff, AZ
Flagstaff, AZ
Hiking avatar Mar 30 2003
tinyelvis
Hiking1.50 Miles
Hiking1.50 Miles   1 Hour      1.50 mph
 no routes
1st trip
Linked none no linked trail guides
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Short hike while passing through Flag. Hike is easy to locate and easy to get to, including by standard 2-door sedan.
It is a great time to go do this hike as the recent snow/rain and cold weather has formed huge ice crystals and glacier type formations at the mouth of the cave. It reminded me of almost fake ice, like on the Matterhorn at Disneyland when you can see the Abominable Snowman. Ice does not transcend beyond first 15-20 yards of cave, so it's smooth sailing from here.
Not a whole lot of spectacular sights in cave, but if you enjoy geology or have any interest in tectonic processes or "what makes the earth tick," this cave is a great natural classroom.
Also, by sticking to the left when the cave comes to a fork, you will save time and stress on your back from bending over a lot.

Look for circular tin near end of cave...Behind some rocks marked by a cairn/"ebeneezer." Kind of a make-shift trip log/treasure chest. And somebody, please bring a new pen to leave for tin (so future visitors can sign).

:D
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Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
May 00 2002
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 Guides 3
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40 male
 Joined Aug 04 2002
 Phoenix, AZ
Fossil Springs Trail #18 - Fossil CreekCamp Verde, AZ
Camp Verde, AZ
Hiking avatar May 00 2002
tinyelvis
Hiking8.00 Miles 1,391 AEG
Hiking8.00 Miles   9 Hrs      0.89 mph
1,391 ft AEG
 no routes
1st trip
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I last hiked Fossil Springs before the fire(s) shut down the trail last summer, and I can't wait until I go there again here shortly. I too have done this trail numerous times, and by far, if you have the time and the resources, the best place/ way to do this hike is to park a car at the bottom of the flume and then to start with another car back at the top. If you don't have a car, the Flume Trail is considerably longer but it will save you the heartache of having to hike back out the way most people go (the steep route). To get to the end of the flume, continue on the road straight, past the fossil springs trailhead. The road is thin at times, but you should see an old flume across the valley to your right and a parking lot at the bottom. This is where you will end up in a few hours.
The first time I did this trail (via the hard way), I couldn't help but be discouraged by the painful looks and red, winded faces of the young Boy Scouts (with camping gear on their backs) that just wanted to make it out alive that day. I can't tell you how many times I was asked, "Are we almost there?" on the way in by groups leaving in the glowing sun.
Make sure that you don't go too crazy while you're down there because you will still have to use those same muscles to crawl back out. Word of advice: If you are bringing your dog with you, please make sure they don't go "balls to the wall" while swimming in the pools and that they have plenty of food and water before hiking out, especially if going out the steeper way. I have seen at least one person carrying (even using a make-shift stretcher) a dog out every time I have gone via the steep route.
Other than that, be careful of the flume if you decide to hike out following the water line. (03.jpg) I was talking to a group on the way out that said they met a group on the way in that had lost a puppy that was walking on the flume and fell in. From there, it would be very difficult to escape this waterslide from hell.
Despite all of these warnings, this is truly one of the greatest reward hikes in Arizona. Despite the crowds that you will find there sometimes, you can't help but feel you've discovered you're own little oasis.
Also, there's a great cave (04.jpg) beyond the dam, maybe 100 yards.
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Confuscius say, "He who stands on toilet is high on pot."
average hiking speed 1.28 mph

WARNING! Hiking and outdoor related sports can be dangerous. Be responsible and prepare for the trip. Study the area you are entering and plan accordingly. Dress for the current and unexpected weather changes. Take plenty of water. Never go alone. Make an itinerary with your plan(s), route(s), destination(s) and expected return time. Give your itinerary to trusted family and/or friends.

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